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Stipula Passaporto Generations - Quick Comparison

pocket pen stipula passaporto

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#1 BaronWulfraed

BaronWulfraed

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Posted 07 April 2019 - 01:39

Having just received the Stipula Passaporto Superleggera I thought a quick side-by-side review with the previous generation might be of interest (especially with the thread looking for a pocket pen). This also turns out to be my first attempt with images uploaded to FPN * (hmmm, not visible in "My Media" so I seem to need to do this the long way)

 

First: packaging: I compare the box my Passaporto LE ebonite came in to that of the Passaporto Superleggera Stealth.

 

fpn_1554597150__passaporto_box.jpg

 

The LE ebonite arrived in a box with enough space for four Passaporto pens, with a pull out drawer containing the manual, an eyedropper, and an international short cartridge.

 

The Superleggero Stealth comes in a much smaller foam-lined tin, also with an eyedropper, along with two vials of ink (appear to be a blue and a green)

 

Side-by-side images. While the capped and posted images are not to the same scale**, the capped LE and Stealth were on the same original photo, and the posted clear models were also together on a second image (as will be obvious, the older clear model is currently in my rotation -- I have not inked the new ones yet).

fpn_1554596950__passaporto.jpg

 

The Superleggero models have practically no markings. "Stipula" appears on the nib along with some leaf markings. That is it for the current model. It has a metal-look section which tapers from the barrel to the short nib. Given the presence of mold lines on the threads, and on the cap band, I presume both are chrome-plated plastic and not actual metal. The cap has a noticeable taper. The Superleggero is an eyedropper-only pen. The clear and stealth models were each obtained for a mere $40

 

The previous generation pens have the Stipula leaf embedded in the cap band, where it barely serves to reduce the pen's tendency to roll across surfaces. "Stipula" and "Made in Italy" are engraved on the body. The section is plastic (ebonite for the LE) and has a flare at the end which would help to prevent one's fingers from slipping onto the nib itself. The nib is longer and slimmer. The cap and barrel have similar tapers (almost none) with rounded ends. The interior of the cap, on the clear model, appears to be frosted -- possibly left-overs from machining. While I'm using it as a eyedropper, the section does contain a nipple compatible with international standard short cartridges. I paid $125 for LE, and $100 for clear -- nine years ago.

 

I understand the first generation pens did not have threads on the end of the body for posting; all of mine are threaded.

 

I should have included a ruler in the photos. The previous generation, capped, comes in at 3.6 inches (well, 3.590 according to the calipers, but what's 1/100 of an inch... Posted, it is 4.7 inches.

 

The Superleggero capped comes in at 3.7 inches... Posted, it is 4.9. ***

 

 

 

 

* Normally I upload images to web-space allotted to my Earthlink email accounts -- but at the present moment I can neither connect to them via FTP nor display them. I'm hoping it is just a down server and not that Earthlink had deleted the web space (Last summer I had to downgrade from full DSL service to an email-only service, as my ISP changed to ATT U-Verse).

 

** It was a pain in Photoshop to select the clear models and not the background, so I could move the images onto a single grey backdrop, the caps faded into the white paper upon which I'd photographed them. I had to paint the selection region, rather than rely on "Magic Wand" automation.

 

*** I really should have grabbed the dial caliper rather than the vernier -- it has a drive wheel; pressing the friction lock of the vernier and trying to push it closed when there is only an inch extending to be gripped is not easy.



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