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Parker 51 With Platinum Carbon/micropigment Ink

parker 51 platinum carbon pigment ink clog

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#1 jcm499

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Posted 29 March 2019 - 17:59

Has anyone used Platinum Carbon or another permanent micropigment ink in a Parker 51, and what were the results? How insane is this idea? I am concerned about particles clogging the finely finned collector.

 



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#2 Old Salt

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Posted 30 March 2019 - 00:33

I think you should follow your instincts. Don’t put a pigmented ink in a P-51.
The Areometrics with their ply glass sacs are more forgiving of inks, but the Vacs take more care.
All models have a collector system. Not easy to get in there and clean.
Just me, but I avoid any of the highly saturated and boutique ink that take extra effort to clean out of a pen when it comes to my Parker 51’s. I do use them in c/c pens. Every one is different some guys put anything they want in their 51’s, and claim no adverse effects. Depends on how often you want to service the pen.
Right now I only use Aurora Blue, or Aurora Blue Black in my 51’s.

#3 jcm499

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Posted 30 March 2019 - 01:12

The Areometrics with their ply glass sacs are more forgiving of inks, but the Vacs take more care.

 

Thank you, and yes, I should have mentioned I am thinking of an aerometric. I'm not too concerned about the sac, since I figure if it can (sorta) handle Superchrome it should be able to handle pretty much anything on the market today--- and even if not, it can be replaced easily enough.  It's clogging up the collector I'm worried about, since its fins are finer than those on most pens. 

 

I'm pretty pen-monogamous, well, serially at least. I've been using this 51 for some years, exclusively with Pilot Blue-Black. I'd like to do some sketching with the pen so I was looking for an intense black that can take a watercolor wash.   Platinum carbon would fit the bill, but for peace of mind ...



#4 gyasko

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Posted 30 March 2019 - 01:21

The issue is the collector. All those fine grooves are perfect places for particles to settle.

I would definitely not put a pigment ink through a 51.

#5 JonSzanto

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Posted 30 March 2019 - 01:38

One of the worst possible things to do with that pen.


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#6 Old Salt

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Posted 31 March 2019 - 00:34

Aurora Black might work for you, and yet be kind to your pen. I also favor pilot blue black in my other pens. I like it’s water resistant qualities, but in a pen with a fine nib, wish it was a bit more color saturated.
Recently I brushed the dust off my “ink drawer” and found 6 bottles of the old version of Pelikan Blue Black. It’s been 5+ years, i’ve fallen in love with it all over again. Not going into the 51’s though☹️

#7 Tweel

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Posted 31 March 2019 - 05:16

Would this really be a problem?  Keeping in mind that they're nanoparticles of ink.  A particle of ink traveling through the collector would be like a golf ball in the Valles Marineris.


fpn_1375035941__postcard_swap.png * * * "Don't neglect to write me several times from different places when you may."
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#8 Old Salt

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Posted 31 March 2019 - 05:49

Would this really be a problem?  Keeping in mind that they're nanoparticles of ink.  A particle of ink traveling through the collector would be like a golf ball in the Valles Marineris.


If the 51 was still in production, and easily replaced you could make a case to try something different. Even buying a replacement if something went wrong. But these are 70 year old pens still going strong and no longer in production. I think they deserve a little extra care and respect. Every pen has an ink that it likes best. We tailor inks to pens all the time. I would experiment with modern nano inks on another pen.

#9 jcm499

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Posted 31 March 2019 - 17:54

Would this really be a problem?  Keeping in mind that they're nanoparticles of ink.  A particle of ink traveling through the collector would be like a golf ball in the Valles Marineris.

 

You might be totally right, I’m just not brave enough to find out for myself. Platinum, after all, released a special pen for Carbon Black and warns, “You should be careful, however, to deal with carbon ink in your fountain pen. Ultrafine particle carbon powder was included in the ink. Comparing to the ink water-based with dyes, it tends to be stopped up because particles are coarse. If you use your fountain pen with the carbon ink everyday, there may not come problems but in case you have long period to use the fountain pen, it will be clogged. It causes serious problem because it is not easy to clean the pen clogged with the ink and dried up.”

 

Retailer Cultpens says “We will not accept liability for damage to fountain pens arising from use of this ink. We do not recommend its use in vintage, valuable or sentimentally-valuable pens! This ink should only be purchased by expert users who understand the risks associated with using it. By ordering this item you confirm that you have read and understood this.”

 

Now, that might all be as specious as the “only use [Parker] ink in [Parker] pens” line that virtually every manufacturer spouts, but again, I’m not brave enough to find out for myself.  That’s why I’m so grateful for the knowledge base of this community! Also, since there are easily dozens, maybe hundreds, of different black inks in production, why not see if one or more of them meets my needs without the maintenance concerns?

 

P.S. I had to look up the Valles Marineris. I’ve never been to Mars myself; in fact, I get annoyed when I have to go north of 14th Street.



#10 pajaro

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Posted 31 March 2019 - 18:26

 

You might be totally right, I’m just not brave enough to find out for myself. Platinum, after all, released a special pen for Carbon Black and warns, “You should be careful, however, to deal with carbon ink in your fountain pen. Ultrafine particle carbon powder was included in the ink. Comparing to the ink water-based with dyes, it tends to be stopped up because particles are coarse. If you use your fountain pen with the carbon ink everyday, there may not come problems but in case you have long period to use the fountain pen, it will be clogged. It causes serious problem because it is not easy to clean the pen clogged with the ink and dried up.”

 

Retailer Cultpens says “We will not accept liability for damage to fountain pens arising from use of this ink. We do not recommend its use in vintage, valuable or sentimentally-valuable pens! This ink should only be purchased by expert users who understand the risks associated with using it. By ordering this item you confirm that you have read and understood this.”

 

Now, that might all be as specious as the “only use [Parker] ink in [Parker] pens” line that virtually every manufacturer spouts, but again, I’m not brave enough to find out for myself.  That’s why I’m so grateful for the knowledge base of this community! Also, since there are easily dozens, maybe hundreds, of different black inks in production, why not see if one or more of them meets my needs without the maintenance concerns?

 

P.S. I had to look up the Valles Marineris. I’ve never been to Mars myself; in fact, I get annoyed when I have to go north of 14th Street.

 

 

Don't you think the above caveats about vintage pens should answer your question?  As for the following, if this is unquestionably the case, give it a try on your own 51:

 

Would this really be a problem?  Keeping in mind that they're nanoparticles of ink.  A particle of ink traveling through the collector would be like a golf ball in the Valles Marineris.

 

I am not using it in my 51s.  I use Montblanc or Sheaffer blue black in my 51s, but I am not trying Montblanc Permanent Blue, said to be a nanopigmented ink, in my 51s.  The MB Permanent Blue did somehow jam up a Parker Sonnet and a Waterman Carene medium, so I am leaving it for use in the C/C pens that are easy to flush.  I have no 51s to offer up as a sacrifice to the Heavier Than Air deity.


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#11 Tweel

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Posted 01 April 2019 - 17:03

Well, the way an ink behaves in a given pen isn't always predictable, so maybe Platinum Carbon would be a problem in a 51.  I wouldn't expect it to be a problem based on the pitch between collector fins, though.  Letting the ink dry out in the pen would be a problem.

 

FWIW, I've been using two nano inks in two pens, neither pen a 51, neither ink Platinum Carbon, for months now without a problem.  No flushing, I just refill when the pens run out.  The inks really just behave like dye inks.  (The combinations are Sailor Sei-Boku in a Pelikan M101N fitted with a CN nib and ebonite 140/400 feed, and Platinum Pigment Sepia in a Cross Townsend.)


fpn_1375035941__postcard_swap.png * * * "Don't neglect to write me several times from different places when you may."
-- John Purdue (1863)

 






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: parker 51, platinum carbon, pigment, ink, clog



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