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Left Handed Improvement Hand Writing

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#1 PanchoElizalde

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Posted 28 March 2019 - 02:30

I'm 3an old left handed writer. I love use fountain pens and I like to improve my hand writing.

All books reccomended in this forum are before the left handed people were enable to use left hand.

Do you know any good text for left handed imrovement hand writing?

Thanks a lot


Pancho


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#2 BDarchitect

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Posted 28 March 2019 - 04:26

Hello Pancho-  We are probably a similar vintage, and I am also a left handed writer.  I have recently been training myself to change from side writing to under writing, and am enjoying writing now for the first time in my life, especially with fountain pens.

I have purchased a number of guide books that have been helpful in different ways, and these are the ones I would suggest-

Write Now, by Barbara Getty and Inga Dubay is very helpful and addresses the particular issues facing lefties.  Even more attention to left handed writers is given in Improve Your Handwriting, by Rosemary Sassoon.  Neither are very expensive but both offer excellent penmanship advice for contemporary italic writing styles.  If you are hoping to improve a more traditional handwriting style, say a Palmer Method style, then Michael Sull's The Art of Cursive Penmanship is very helpful with some instruction for lefties (though the book itself is wire bound which, for a lefty, gets in the way of using many of the practice lines on the pages).  That is available at Goulet Pens dot com for about $20 US plus shipping.  

Improve Your Handwriting is good at continual reference to lefties through the text, but most other books include a couple of paragraphs at the beginning about proper pen grip and paper orientation and then never come back to discussing the unique challenges lefties face pushing a pen nib, connecting letters, crossing t's, etc.  

There is also a small book by Vance Studley written in the '70s called Left-Handed Calligraphy, which is exclusively written for lefties.  Still in print for about $7 US, and full of examples of many classic broad nib alphabet styles.

You might also look for YouTube videos by John DeCollibus, who is an accomplished left handed calligrapher. 

 

Good luck, improving your penmanship is a totally worthwhile endeavor!  Be patient and stick to it, the old brain/hand habits take a while to undo and retrain.



#3 sidthecat

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 04:12

I’m a southpaw who varies between overhand, sidehand and a couple of eccentric variants. I’m not especially systematic about my writing at all, but every animation professional is essentially an amateur forger. So what I’ve mostly done is learn to forge the styles I like: most recently Edward Johnston’s script, which is very upright and handsome; relatively easy to do with the left hand. The downside is the limited number of examples and total lack of instruction in it. That said, it’s appealing and very legible.

#4 leksluthah

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Posted 17 June 2019 - 15:57

Hello Pancho-  We are probably a similar vintage, and I am also a left handed writer.  I have recently been training myself to change from side writing to under writing, and am enjoying writing now for the first time in my life, especially with fountain pens.

I have purchased a number of guide books that have been helpful in different ways, and these are the ones I would suggest-

Write Now, by Barbara Getty and Inga Dubay is very helpful and addresses the particular issues facing lefties.  Even more attention to left handed writers is given in Improve Your Handwriting, by Rosemary Sassoon.  Neither are very expensive but both offer excellent penmanship advice for contemporary italic writing styles.  If you are hoping to improve a more traditional handwriting style, say a Palmer Method style, then Michael Sull's The Art of Cursive Penmanship is very helpful with some instruction for lefties (though the book itself is wire bound which, for a lefty, gets in the way of using many of the practice lines on the pages).  That is available at Goulet Pens dot com for about $20 US plus shipping.  

Improve Your Handwriting is good at continual reference to lefties through the text, but most other books include a couple of paragraphs at the beginning about proper pen grip and paper orientation and then never come back to discussing the unique challenges lefties face pushing a pen nib, connecting letters, crossing t's, etc.  

There is also a small book by Vance Studley written in the '70s called Left-Handed Calligraphy, which is exclusively written for lefties.  Still in print for about $7 US, and full of examples of many classic broad nib alphabet styles.

You might also look for YouTube videos by John DeCollibus, who is an accomplished left handed calligrapher. 

 

Good luck, improving your penmanship is a totally worthwhile endeavor!  Be patient and stick to it, the old brain/hand habits take a while to undo and retrain.

 

+1

 

I'm glad to read about others having the same struggles as myself.  I'd say try to get or read as many varied books as possible, but then experiment for yourself.  My handwriting is still not great, but when I found authors who suggested concentrating on comfort, rhythm, and relaxed grip, my ability to write legibly changed considerably.  I also now write with the paper on my right tilted some.  That helps, too.  Keep experimenting and try things until you find your own sweet spot.  I have a copy of the Getty Dubay book and the Vance Studley book and refer back to them regularly, so that's a great place to start.  







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