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Calligraphy For Checks And Business Forms


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#1 Retro-user

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Posted 23 February 2019 - 10:42

Has anyone used Spencerian, Italic or any other calligraphic script for filling out checks or other business forms or documents? I wonder how practical it would be, given the difficulty todays generation has with reading cursive.

Edited by Retro-user, 23 February 2019 - 10:42.


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#2 sciumbasci

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Posted 23 February 2019 - 13:45

I am an amateur italic writer, and often mail stuff around.
Addresses in the envelopes are always written in italic, and so far it has given me the best results.

Just make sure to use a permanent ink.

#3 tamiya

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Posted 23 February 2019 - 23:37

No trouble with postal machines deciphering the fancy writing?

Used to keep a typewriter for envelopes but these days too lazy to unearth it, I favour block print with a big fat texta. :)

#4 dms525

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Posted 24 February 2019 - 03:27

I have used italic handwriting for checks, various forms and prescriptions. Besides providing an opportunity to practice, the reaction of medical and dental office staffs, bank tellers and pharmacists is most entertaining. I also use italic script to write letters and address envelopes. I had a post office clerk ask me if I would address her wedding invitations once. 

 

The biggest problem I've had is with forms and checks printed on paper that feathered or bled through. Usually, I can find a pen and ink combination that provides acceptable results.

 

David



#5 Ryan5

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Posted 25 February 2019 - 08:46

If the machine can't read it, then the Post Office has people that can. There are wedding calligraphers that address wedding invitations using Spencerian etc. without any trouble.

The main issue I would think of is the impression it would make. I would not use ornamental writing in situations where I have to come across as professional. That said, a simple Spencerian is not that different from normal cursive, especially Palmer. The most relevant difference is probably the angle at what it is written. Shading will probably be the biggest factor in determining if it is perceived as calligraphy.

With italic, there are a lot of versions that are more classified as everyday hand writing. Sometimes these differ between calligraphic versions only in the speed written and writing utensil used. Basically, you can use italic for any occasion where you would handwrite something. Just match the level of ornamentation. Italic is the very similar to what we consider normal fonts, so it is the most legible and safest script. Carolingian and Foundational are also closely related. I also find Uncial easy to read.

With forms, some explicitly ask for print letter, you can use non connected italic for this. Also, if there are spaces on a form for each letter, stay within those spaces.

My coworker always writes on contracts in all caps, which she learned is the correct way. I am not sure where this rule applies, but I appreciate how much easier to read her handwriting is compared to my boss's.

When acting as a private person, feel free to go wild. Maybe stop short of filling out your tax forms in Fraktur, but you can pay your bills in Spencerian, without any worry.

#6 Tasmith

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Posted 05 March 2019 - 03:33

I have used italic handwriting for checks, various forms and prescriptions. Besides providing an opportunity to practice, the reaction of medical and dental office staffs, bank tellers and pharmacists is most entertaining. I also use italic script to write letters and address envelopes. I had a post office clerk ask me if I would address her wedding invitations once. 

 

The biggest problem I've had is with forms and checks printed on paper that feathered or bled through. Usually, I can find a pen and ink combination that provides acceptable results.

 

David

Italic on checks and addressing envelopes with Diamine Registar's Ink.  Does not feather, well behaved, and very water resistant.   Almost always get compliments from tellers and clerks.


Edited by Tasmith, 05 March 2019 - 03:34.







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