Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies






Photo

Objectively, How Thin Or Thick A Line Do You Require Your Nibs To Produce?

nib size line width handwriting

33 replies to this topic

#21 miwishi63

miwishi63

    AZPenGuy

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 474 posts
  • Location:Arizona
  • Flag:

Posted 19 February 2019 - 03:51

Writing is far more challenging, even though it only comprises 24 pen-strokes (as opposed to 36 in ). It requires about 24 to 25 horizontal partitions of the em-space, or as a loose equivalent, drawing 13 distinct parallel horizontal lines with a steady hand, so the line width cannot be thicker than 0.2mm.

 

 

Thanks. Are those line widths expressed in millimetres, centimetres, or some other unit of measurement?

 

Based on the fact that my measurements come from Asian writing instruments, I'm going to assume it's millimeters.



Sponsored Content

#22 A Smug Dill

A Smug Dill

    飽食終日無所用心

  • FPN Supporter - Rhodium

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,736 posts
  • Location:Sydney, Australia
  • Flag:

Posted 19 February 2019 - 04:09

Based on the fact that my measurements come from Asian writing instruments, I'm going to assume it's millimeters.

 

 

I've never come across any writing instrument (including technical pens, outside of things used in highly specialised laboratories, etc.) that is specified or marketed as being finer than 0.05mm, when 0.1mm is considered 'needlepoint' for fountain pen nibs. ".02-.03" would be very fine indeed.


Let's give each other due respect, and approach discussion rigorously. I believe we're all peers and equals here as fellow hobbyists, with common interests in the acquisition and use of fountain pens, but no shared values and no obligation to offer each other moral support for one's narrative.

Don't think 'cos I understand, I care
Don't think 'cos I'm talking, we're friends

'6 Underground' by Sneaker Pimps


#23 5Cavaliers

5Cavaliers

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,575 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 19 February 2019 - 04:46

Thank you for your clarification. 

 

In general, for my basic day to day writing, I prefer my downstroke lines to be "wide" - probably between 0.7 and 1.2, where as my horizontal lines to be somewhere between 0.3 and 0.5.  These are approximate and will vary depending upon my writing. 

 

In my work, I draft flowcharts and other illustrations with descriptions.  In these, I generally prefer an even thicker line. 

 

Beyond these very general dimensions, I do not take much further regard.


"Today will be gone in less than 24 hours.  When it is gone, it is gone.  Be wise, but enjoy!  - anonymous today

 

 

 


#24 kmcmichael

kmcmichael

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 54 posts
  • Location:Dallas
  • Flag:

Posted 19 February 2019 - 12:35

While certainly not the penman I believe many of you to be, I like big nibs. I find a 1.1 about perfect for a lined A-5, skipping a line each time. I have a MB 149 BB that writes about the same. If I were still signing documents regularly and not using a stamp, I would use a 1.9mm. I believe that I do have a rather light touch

#25 miwishi63

miwishi63

    AZPenGuy

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 474 posts
  • Location:Arizona
  • Flag:

Posted 19 February 2019 - 15:31

 

 

I've never come across any writing instrument (including technical pens, outside of things used in highly specialised laboratories, etc.) that is specified or marketed as being finer than 0.05mm, when 0.1mm is considered 'needlepoint' for fountain pen nibs. ".02-.03" would be very fine indeed.

 

Thanks for pointing that out! This is why I never try to build anything. The nibs on the Preppies I have are marked 02, 03, and 05. Don't know what that means except that they are designate EF, F, and M.

 

Mike



#26 A Smug Dill

A Smug Dill

    飽食終日無所用心

  • FPN Supporter - Rhodium

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,736 posts
  • Location:Sydney, Australia
  • Flag:

Posted 19 February 2019 - 16:35

The nibs on the Preppies I have are marked 02, 03, and 05. Don't know what that means except that they are designate EF, F, and M.


It's apparently Platinum's practice not to use a decimal point when denoting the sizes of its pens' and nibs' points. Just about any other pen manufacturer, would have written 0.2, 0.3 and 0.5(mm) instead. You're correct in your interpretation, though. I think Platinum was trying to increase the appeal of Preppy pens to the average consumer by making them look like any number of disposable marker pens in the same price range, including marking the 'point size' of the pens in a similar way. I'm confident that, when used with the supplied ink cartridge, a Preppy with an 02 nib is expected to produce a line similar in width to a 0.2mm marker pen.


Let's give each other due respect, and approach discussion rigorously. I believe we're all peers and equals here as fellow hobbyists, with common interests in the acquisition and use of fountain pens, but no shared values and no obligation to offer each other moral support for one's narrative.

Don't think 'cos I understand, I care
Don't think 'cos I'm talking, we're friends

'6 Underground' by Sneaker Pimps


#27 BaronWulfraed

BaronWulfraed

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,171 posts
  • Location:Lowell, MI
  • Flag:

Posted 19 February 2019 - 18:59

Just don't think Platinum's 02/03/05 carry over to things like Pigma Micron drawing pens, wherein

 

005 => 0.20mm

01 => 0.25mm

03 => 0.35mm



#28 miwishi63

miwishi63

    AZPenGuy

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 474 posts
  • Location:Arizona
  • Flag:

Posted 19 February 2019 - 21:01

It's apparently Platinum's practice not to use a decimal point when denoting the sizes of its pens' and nibs' points. Just about any other pen manufacturer, would have written 0.2, 0.3 and 0.5(mm) instead. You're correct in your interpretation, though. I think Platinum was trying to increase the appeal of Preppy pens to the average consumer by making them look like any number of disposable marker pens in the same price range, including marking the 'point size' of the pens in a similar way. I'm confident that, when used with the supplied ink cartridge, a Preppy with an 02 nib is expected to produce a line similar in width to a 0.2mm marker pen.

 

Makes sense. Thanks! I enjoy using the 0.2, but only for writing, not sketching. It  does indeed. make an extremely fine line when used with Platinum ink cartridges.



#29 Honeybadgers

Honeybadgers

    Donor Pen

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,445 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 20 February 2019 - 04:40

I love a super wet needlepoint. it sounds like an oxymoron, but some pens can leave a bead of ink sitting on the page that's just a gnat's d**k across. My custom superflex XXF 14k nib does that better than any other nib I own. I have a sheaffer snorkel X4 that can as well. 

 

Japanese F is about as wide as I really like in daily writing. I tend to prefer EF or narrower than that. Western, EF every time unless I'm getting something special. After an EF, I go to the extreme other end and jump on the B and BB

 

So if you need a loupe and a micrometer to measure the line width, that's about where I like it.


Selling a boatload of restored, fairly rare, vintage Japanese gold nib pens, click here to see (more added as I finish restoring them)


#30 Sicblades14

Sicblades14

    Near Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPip
  • 42 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 21 February 2019 - 23:20

After testing out many different types of pens and line widths - the absolute widest I can use is 0.5mm, which is about a western Extra Fine, but I usually prefer 0.38 or 0.28 which ends up leaving me with my EDCs; my PCH912 PO Nib and the Preppy 02 EF.

 

I can sometimes use a Sailor M nib, but that is rare, and I usually only use it for titles or highlighting important info on my page.



#31 A Smug Dill

A Smug Dill

    飽食終日無所用心

  • FPN Supporter - Rhodium

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,736 posts
  • Location:Sydney, Australia
  • Flag:

Posted 21 February 2019 - 23:26

Thank you, Sicblades14.

 

Have you tried a Sailor 14K gold H-MF nib? The two I have are surprisingly fine. Even the steel MF nibs on my cheap Sailor Lecoule pens leave reasonably narrow lines, though.


Let's give each other due respect, and approach discussion rigorously. I believe we're all peers and equals here as fellow hobbyists, with common interests in the acquisition and use of fountain pens, but no shared values and no obligation to offer each other moral support for one's narrative.

Don't think 'cos I understand, I care
Don't think 'cos I'm talking, we're friends

'6 Underground' by Sneaker Pimps


#32 Sicblades14

Sicblades14

    Near Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPip
  • 42 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 21 February 2019 - 23:46

Thank you, Sicblades14.

 

Have you tried a Sailor 14K gold H-MF nib? The two I have are surprisingly fine. Even the steel MF nibs on my cheap Sailor Lecoule pens leave reasonably narrow lines, though.

 

I haven't tried that one, though I have a Pro Gear Demonstrator with a H-M nib that I don't mind using, but it is on the wider end of what I typically enjoy using.



#33 BaronWulfraed

BaronWulfraed

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,171 posts
  • Location:Lowell, MI
  • Flag:

Posted 22 February 2019 - 19:58

After testing out many different types of pens and line widths - the absolute widest I can use is 0.5mm, which is about a western Extra Fine, but I usually prefer 0.38 or 0.28 which ends up leaving me with my EDCs; my PCH912 PO Nib and the Preppy 02 EF.

You seem to have some fat pens or very absorbent (spreading) paper...

 

My currently inked "western" nib pens (vertical x horizontal - optical comparator, using metric scale [inch scale reads finer, the metric is marked at 0.2 increments, so I'm having to estimate the splits], on Levenger recycled 3x5 note cards)

 

Lamy Al-Star M 0.5x0.4

Sheaffer Stylist/Imperial (727/777?) B 0.7x0.6

Esterbrook 9556 "Firm Fine" 0.5x0.3

Esterbrook 2668 "Firm Medium" 0.6x0.5

 

and for giggles

 

Lamy Joy 1.1 italic  0.7x0.0.3

 

inked Japanese nibs:

 

Platinum President M 0.3x0.2

Pilot Falcon SB 0.8x0.4

Pilot Custom 912 FA (no pressure) 0.2x0.2 (pressure) 0.9x0.4

 

In my hands, Lamy Medium and Esterbrook Fine both meet your upper limit -- what you describe as an Extra Fine nib. Note that even the "1.1" italic only produced a 0.7mm line for me.



#34 Sicblades14

Sicblades14

    Near Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPip
  • 42 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 22 February 2019 - 20:39

You seem to have some fat pens or very absorbent (spreading) paper...

 

My currently inked "western" nib pens (vertical x horizontal - optical comparator, using metric scale [inch scale reads finer, the metric is marked at 0.2 increments, so I'm having to estimate the splits], on Levenger recycled 3x5 note cards)

 

Lamy Al-Star M 0.5x0.4

Sheaffer Stylist/Imperial (727/777?) B 0.7x0.6

Esterbrook 9556 "Firm Fine" 0.5x0.3

Esterbrook 2668 "Firm Medium" 0.6x0.5

 

and for giggles

 

Lamy Joy 1.1 italic  0.7x0.0.3

 

inked Japanese nibs:

 

Platinum President M 0.3x0.2

Pilot Falcon SB 0.8x0.4

Pilot Custom 912 FA (no pressure) 0.2x0.2 (pressure) 0.9x0.4

 

In my hands, Lamy Medium and Esterbrook Fine both meet your upper limit -- what you describe as an Extra Fine nib. Note that even the "1.1" italic only produced a 0.7mm line for me.

 

Maybe you have less pressure than I do when writing - and I typically write on Rhodia pads, or some TR sheets. I tend to write on the really small side though

 

For every day note taking I use my PO nib, and the preppy 02. I tried a Lamy M and it was too wide for my liking, but I guess I can see the appeal for those who write bigger than I do. 





Reply to this topic



  



Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: nib size, line width, handwriting



Sponsored Content




|