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Identity And Value Of This Old Fountain Pen Inkwell

eagle pencil company inkwell

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8 replies to this topic

#1 schnorg

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Posted 15 February 2019 - 18:01

This probably goes with the Eagle Pencil Co. fountain pen I just posted.

 

I cannot identify this item.  I'm guessing it's roughly 100 years old, but can't be sure.

 

On the reverse, it has two markings:

one says "No 4"

one says "RD505078"

 

I'd greatly appreciate any input on its identity and value.

 

Thanks!

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#2 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 15 February 2019 - 20:17

See if you picture holding company can be fit in the little gree box just above.

 

I'm not going hunting through the wild net, with things that need to be down loaded into my computer.

I do have 25-30 ink wells and inkwell sets.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#3 AAAndrew

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Posted 18 February 2019 - 02:03

This is a fairly standard metal and glass ink well set from probably 1880's-1910's. A lot of companies made these, and I'm no collector, but I can say if it was made by Eagle, it would be marked as such. I suspect one of the many, many manufacturers. It seems fairly well-made, though I suspect it's pot-metal rather than bronze. it's also nice that you have the little metal caps for the inkwells, which is less common. 

 

BTW, these were made for dip pens, not fountain pens. 

 

Like I said, I'm no collector. If this is pot metal I'd take a wild guess of maybe $35-$45, mainly because of the lids. If it's bronze it would be more. Total guesses, so don't take it for more authoritative than it is. (which is not terribly much)



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#4 Honeybadgers

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Posted 18 February 2019 - 08:32

Other people are brave to click on all the .pdf's. I won't and I trust my antivirus/firewalls a lot.


Selling a boatload of restored, fairly rare, vintage Japanese gold nib pens, click here to see (more added as I finish restoring them)


#5 Parker51

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Posted 18 February 2019 - 10:31

Nothing has any value, except to the owner and user and to potential users and owners. All value is based on guesses and estimates, always. If you don't want something and it can't be traded (sold in a market economy) then it has no value.
As another poster noted regarding themselves, I value my time too much to do your research on past sales.

#6 schnorg

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Posted 18 February 2019 - 16:36

Thanks, Timorous Beastie for your insights!

 

Apologies to all for using pdf.  I didn't know how to resize jpg, but have figured that out and attached now as 0.25MB jpg.  

 

I think this is pot metal/zinc, based on the tap test - a dull thud.

 

Any additional thoughts with better pictures here?

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#7 Bibliophage

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Posted 18 February 2019 - 19:22

Check it with a magnet.  It may be iron. 

 

As for value?   Probably little to none.   "hobby" antiques are mostly only worth big money if they're readily identifiable as to maker, rarity, and shock value.   Pen accessories, safety razors, etc, are usually only worth 'money' if you can prove that they were owned by someone important, such as "Count Zeppelin's Inkwell!"  and "George Washington's Straight Razor". 



#8 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 19 February 2019 - 11:52

They were made for constant use, and folks knowing how much water to add, when the ink evaporated. There are few pressure sealed inkwells, a few more screw on tops which work, but most of the ink wells let the ink dry out. :( Most of mine are such.

 

E20 or so....if not iron. Nothing special. 1880-90's as said.

 

 

Make sure you get the glass or porcelain inserts if one buys an inkwell. Otherwise they are not complete, so not worth much.


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 19 February 2019 - 12:21.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#9 carlos.q

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Posted 19 February 2019 - 13:37

Don't be discouraged. If you place it on your coffe table it will have considerable conversation value!





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