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How Many Make Copies Of Letters Written To Keep Track What Was Written?

snail mail pen pal correspondence letter copy history

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30 replies to this topic

#21 Rhincodon

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Posted 25 February 2019 - 19:13

I have a letter ledger that I keep track of things with. It's not super detailed, just notes on the topics mentioned between us. I realized when I started getting more penpals that I didn't want to repeat myself or lose a train of conversation so this works well enough.


I'll come up with something eventually.

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#22 AlohaJim

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Posted 26 February 2019 - 17:23

I have a letter ledger that I keep track of things with. It's not super detailed, just notes on the topics mentioned between us. I realized when I started getting more penpals that I didn't want to repeat myself or lose a train of conversation so this works well enough.

 

Excellent tip.

What do you do with the original letters received?? Discard or save?

thanks,

jim



#23 Rhincodon

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Posted 27 February 2019 - 06:11

 

Excellent tip.

What do you do with the original letters received?? Discard or save?

thanks,

jim

 So far I've saved them, ostensibly organized in a file folder by sender. Some have done really nice envelope and letter art that I hesitate to lose. But after watching Marie Kondo, I might do a bit of cleaning, especially for one-offs. I have hoarding tendencies! I need to wait a few years to lose the attachment, haha.


I'll come up with something eventually.

#24 knarflj

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Posted 27 February 2019 - 16:32

Charles Dodgson (aka Lewis Carroll) published his method for keeping track of correspondence in the last chapter of a little book on writing letters, which you can read here:

http://cathlena.org/...tingDodgson.pdf

 

It looks a little more complicated than I think it actually is in use, although I write so few letters that I'm probably not a good judge. :)

 

Jenny


"To read without also writing is to sleep." - St. Jerome

#25 Mac in Alberta

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Posted 07 April 2019 - 21:47

I saw a reference in one of the Horatio Hornblower novels to the captain's making a fair copy of a report for his confidential letter book. That raised the question of a way of organizing files and correspondence that predates the filing cabinet, manila folder, and typewriter methods that probably only started after the fictional sailor's possible life expectancy. 

So I draft letters in a notebook, mark up the draft, and copy that onto writing paper and mail it. I keep incoming mail until that section of the desk drawer is crowded, then dispose of older letters first.


Sometimes a technology reaches perfection and further development is just tinkering. The fountain pen is a good example of this.

#26 Charles Rice

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Posted 07 April 2019 - 23:12

I don't, but I should.  And sometimes I get letters which contain answers to questions other pen-pals of the sender have asked.


Edited by Charles Rice, 07 April 2019 - 23:13.


#27 Old Salt

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Posted 08 April 2019 - 01:49

I draft my letters and greeting cards in a spiral notebok. Sometimes what is in my notebook can be slightly different from the final sent letter, but, I do have a record and they are all in one notebook.

#28 Sui-Generis

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Posted 08 April 2019 - 22:14

I know I'm going to get stoned for this suggestion.

 

But there's always carbon paper...the down side of course, is that it relies on pressure so a fountain pen would be no go.


Arguing with people on the Internet is like playing chess with a pigeon. No matter how good you are at chess, the pigeon will just knock the pieces over, s**t on the board and strut around like it's victorious.


#29 Freddy

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Posted 08 April 2019 - 23:08

I know I'm going to get stoned for this suggestion.

 

But there's always carbon paper...the down side of course, is that it relies on pressure so a fountain pen would be no go.

Only in The Life Of Brian.....................

 

Manifold................Nib.............................. 

 

     Fred.......

Always Look On The Bright Side Of Life......



#30 Bookman

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Posted 13 April 2019 - 04:43

I scan almost every piece of correspondence I send out, holiday cards and most birthday cards excepted.


I love the smell of fountain pen ink in the morning.

 

 

 


#31 AlohaJim

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Posted 28 June 2019 - 00:27

What's worked well for me so far. . . 

 

1. Draft return letters on my MacBook. I can get my thoughts down best this way and edit out awkward passages, and things that don't sound right. Make for a more cohesive end product.

2. Print out and edit if needed by hand. Edit in computer. Then print out final return letter draft.

3. Write the letter. This way I can focus on trying to write well. And, can just copy the printout.

4. If I just "write", I forget what I'm thinking about because I'm focused on writing carefully and enjoying using the fountain pen.

5. Attach final printout draft of my return letter to the original person's letter and envelope.

6. Write a note on the original person's envelope if I enclosed anything like photos, etc.

7. File


Edited by AlohaJim, 28 June 2019 - 00:28.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: snail, mail, pen, pal, correspondence, letter, copy, history



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