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Pelican 140,

pricing identification age value pelican 140 585 nib

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#41 Parker51

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Posted 19 February 2019 - 02:26

Sorry to ask the obvious question, but in reading through the postings, it appears no one has asked you what the nib is labeled. The 140s I have are labeled with letters telling me when I consulted a Pelikan Nib chart what kind of nib each is and what they origonally were made for. Charts are available on the Internet: search under images and you should find a copy quickly.

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#42 SchaumburgSwan

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Posted 19 February 2019 - 03:41

What this means, unless you are trained to flex writing and really push the nib to accent the flex, is just that when writing normally you get some line variation without thinking about it. Some of the line variation also depends on the squarish tip of these nibs (stub effect).

 

Hi,

 

this "semistub" effect is a very pleasing one!

The same with many Mabie Todd Swan flex nibs...

 

Best

Jens


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#43 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 19 February 2019 - 11:28

Pelikan pens before I think late '54 and '55 are labeled on the barrel to width & if oblique. After late '54/55 on the nib to width. & if it's Oblique.

 

I think of the stubbish semi-flex as that old fashioned fountain pen flair; with out having to do anything at all.

 

Living at the Well, have a couple three or four coffee cups full of semi&maxi-semi-flex nibs...Well some are in a two drawer-ed glass topped cherry pen case, others in a walnut humidor....Only two cups full.............on the desk.

Got 2/3rds of a coffee cup of regular flex also. :rolleyes:


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 19 February 2019 - 11:29.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#44 sansenri

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Posted 19 February 2019 - 17:00

 

Hi,

 

this "semistub" effect is a very pleasing one!

The same with many Mabie Todd Swan flex nibs...

 

Best

Jens

 

exactly, thank you.

 

people seem to worry too much about flex...

with vintage pens it just comes incorporated... (some varying degree of "semi", at least)

just write, you'll note the difference by yourself

 

since it was asked, I was just trying to describe what a 140 nib is like...

also IMHO vintage Pelikan nibs are wet, but not quite as wet as modern Pelikan nibs.



#45 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 19 February 2019 - 21:15

Soft....flair.....wet.

 

Like a Lays Potato Chip....one is not enough.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#46 penman88

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Posted 19 February 2019 - 21:29

 

 Personally, I use very few inks, and my experiences have made me avoid Noodler's, but YMMV.

 

 Enjoy your pen!

.

 EDIT: Bad grammar, as always.

what issues have the noodlers inks caused? or is it just an issue with the writing experience? 


 

Keep your thoughts positive because your thoughts become your words. Keep your words positive because your words become your behavior. Keep your behavior positive because your behavior becomes your habits. Keep your habits positive because your habits become your values. Keep your values positive because your values become your destiny 

 

 


#47 penman88

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Posted 19 February 2019 - 21:32

 

 

Living at the Well, have a couple three or four coffee cups full of semi&maxi-semi-flex nibs...Well some are in a two drawer-ed glass topped cherry pen case, others in a walnut humidor....Only two cups full.............on the desk.

Got 2/3rds of a coffee cup of regular flex also. :rolleyes:

 

is it time to start participating in the P.I.F option of FPN there bobo? perhaps...perhaps haha


 

Keep your thoughts positive because your thoughts become your words. Keep your words positive because your words become your behavior. Keep your behavior positive because your behavior becomes your habits. Keep your habits positive because your habits become your values. Keep your values positive because your values become your destiny 

 

 


#48 AL01

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Posted 19 February 2019 - 22:32

what issues have the noodlers inks caused? or is it just an issue with the writing experience? 

 

 They were inconsistent and just flat out wouldn't flow in many of my pens.

 

 BUT, I have used Noodler's Ottoman Azure with EXCELLENT results.

 

  ... And the usual pen experts don't recommend Noodler's, but we won't go there...



#49 OMASsimo

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Posted 19 February 2019 - 23:10

since it was asked, I was just trying to describe what a 140 nib is like...

also IMHO vintage Pelikan nibs are wet, but not quite as wet as modern Pelikan nibs.

 

I'd not claim that vintage Pelikan nibs are particularly wet but rather that they have amazingly perfect ink flow with essentially every ink I've tried. I always complain about the poor quality of today's average writing paper because wet pens usually cause bleed through and feathering. Not so my vintage Pelikan pens up to the 80s and maybe 90s. But the nibs are certainly not dry either. To me, these are the ultimate performers.



#50 Glenn-SC

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Posted 19 February 2019 - 23:50

what issues have the noodlers inks caused? or is it just an issue with the writing experience? 

 

 

In my experience, Noodlers inks have been incompatible with other inks and pen materials.
I had Noodlers completely lock up the piston of a Lamy 27.

Not worth the risk of putting it in my pens.



#51 biancitwo

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Posted 20 February 2019 - 03:14

I haven't tried one of those, but Bo Bo is right, Pelikan's D nibs are mainly made for mountain climbers, as stabbing weapons for self defense and of course the odd carbon copy form. It is the hardest gold alloy I have experienced, it does not yield even a fraction of its width no matter how hard you press.


I have a 140, with two breather holes. It is the stiffest nib I have. It will not flex any. To call it a nail is understatement. It also writes beautifully. When it arrived, I was disappointed. When I wrote with it, I was thrilled. It is a great pen/nib combination.

#52 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 20 February 2019 - 12:00

Noodlers, nor any supersaturated ink is recommended for any sac pen. They eat the rubber sacs....sacs that should be good for at least 10 years, die in weeks.

 

Certain Noodlers inks had to be re-formulated because they were killing pens............some ate feeds too.

Certain big boy repair folk, said warrantee of theirs was voided by use of Noodler's ink.

Lots of people had troubles............lots didn't....and were just as loud about it.

 

Then and not at the start...Noodler users are saying Nathan wanted everyone to dilute his inks, to make them go further and do away with supersaturated problems............that as I say was not broadcast when Noodlers came in.

 

Do suggest cleaning any supersaturated inked pen after each single use.

 

Bay State Blue......well, wasn't rich enough to dedicate a fountain pen just to that......then after re-formulation....lost it's cachet as the modern Parker Penman Samphire (One of the very first supersaturated inks, with drawn from the market for pen murder, @ 2000, in no one knew about cleaning pens.)

Will say after re-formulation Bay State Blue was not the pen murderer it was before; nor quite the same intense color.

 

I only have two Noodler's inks....in they were very expensive in Europe E22+ for a long time. Before the latest jump in ink prices that was super expensive....same price as Japanese inks.

I understand Noodlers is down to E14 or so now.

I have Apache Sunset and Golden Brown, both are shading inks. Golden Brown is my by far slowest  drying of all my inks. I will be done writing a full second sheet before the first sheet is dry enough to write on the back. Price of mailing from the states was&is so high, I had to wait until I flew in and had it waiting for me at my motel.

 

Noodler's Ottoman Azure, is a well thought of Noodler's ink, that is on my ink list.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#53 penman88

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Posted 20 February 2019 - 17:24

Sorry to ask the obvious question, but in reading through the postings, it appears no one has asked you what the nib is labeled. The 140s I have are labeled with letters telling me when I consulted a Pelikan Nib chart what kind of nib each is and what they origonally were made for. Charts are available on the Internet: search under images and you should find a copy quickly.

 

well because I haven't received the pen yet, and it isn't visible in the pictures I posted earlier in this thread


 

Keep your thoughts positive because your thoughts become your words. Keep your words positive because your words become your behavior. Keep your behavior positive because your behavior becomes your habits. Keep your habits positive because your habits become your values. Keep your values positive because your values become your destiny 

 

 


#54 penman88

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Posted 20 February 2019 - 17:31

 

 

Certain Noodlers inks had to be re-formulated because they were killing pens............some ate feeds too.

Certain big boy repair folk, said warrantee of theirs was voided by use of Noodler's ink.

 

 

Then and not at the start...Noodler users are saying Nathan wanted everyone to dilute his inks, to make them go further and do away with supersaturated problems............that as I say was not broadcast when Noodlers came in.

 

Do suggest cleaning any supersaturated inked pen after each single use.

 

Bay State Blue was not the pen murderer it was before; nor quite the same intense color.

 

I only have two Noodler's inks....in they were very expensive in Europe E22+ for a long time.

I understand Noodlers is down to E14 or so now.

I have Apache Sunset and Golden Brown, both are shading inks. Golden Brown is my by far slowest  drying of all my inks. I will be done writing a full second sheet before the first sheet is dry enough to write on the back. Price of mailing from the states was&is so high, I had to wait until I flew in and had it waiting for me at my motel.

 

Noodler's Ottoman Azure, is a well thought of Noodler's ink, that is on my ink list.

please just tell me if I should just not use noodlers in this pelican. I use it in my faber castell e-motion and it seems ok, but I have only had the pen for a month...the reason I like the noodlers is the vibrant colors and relatively low cost for such a large bottle of ink. I am sure over seas shipping is a bit high, but does amazon not offer free shipping to the EU? anyways I have tried monte verde inks diamine inks and even visconte blue, the more expensive inks seem to write kind of dry, and not have those vibrant pop off the page colors I was looking for. but I would rather have a dull ink that keeps my pen healthy then a vibrant ink that makes my pen ill !!!!


 

Keep your thoughts positive because your thoughts become your words. Keep your words positive because your words become your behavior. Keep your behavior positive because your behavior becomes your habits. Keep your habits positive because your habits become your values. Keep your values positive because your values become your destiny 

 

 


#55 sargetalon

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Posted 20 February 2019 - 18:47

I will say that any super saturated ink runs a higher risk of staining, regardless of the brand. Care should be taken when using such inks and they should not be left in a pen for a prolonged duration. This is where good pen hygiene comes into play. Some colors are more problematic than others. Some brands are more problematic than others. Use what you like, just be mindful that super saturation has its trade offs. I tend to not use Noodlers (except limited applications of Apache Sunset) as per my personal preference. Just not worth the risk to my birds when there are other options out there but thats not to say you cant do so safely.

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#56 Matlock

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Posted 20 February 2019 - 20:19

I use Penman Sapphire quite a lot and have never experienced any problems but I am always aware of good pen hygiene. 


Peter


#57 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 20 February 2019 - 20:21

"Vivid wet line" has noobie written all over it...........OK, one load, one clean.

Someday you will get into 'wishy-washy....pastel, two toned shading ink....but not in semi-flex. That requires a very good paper match, in semi-flex is wet.

 

Regular flex or Japanese 'soft' nibs would do shading inks well, and one needs at least 90g paper outside of Rhodia....and that Japanese paper that I don't have. Regular flex in M and F....Japanese B&M....is good for shading inks.

 

90g paper costs (laser)  twice as much for a ream than a ream of cheap 80g copy paper. As long as you don't feed a printer you are OK.....................do not use Ink Jet Paper....in it's designed to absorb ink very fast....it's a Feather champ.

 

With any ink, the better the paper the more fun.....don't cheap out.

Do as I say....not as I did...........which was chase pen, then chase inks....and finally chase paper.

I suggest as said, a ream or 100 sheet box of good to better paper for every third bottle of ink. That way you don't fall behind the power curve.

 

I have some 40 papers....and feel so 'noobie'.

 

Your Faber Castell is a cartridge pen...which if you have a rubber bulb syringe is very easy to clean.

After  years of trying to avoid cartridges like the plague, Nathan finally bit the bullet, in unless you use a converter or needle fill your old cartridges. Cartridges are expensive.....don't know if Nathan's cartridges are cheap or not.


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 20 February 2019 - 20:27.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#58 Glenn-SC

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Posted 20 February 2019 - 23:06

What the frack?



#59 AL01

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Posted 21 February 2019 - 04:30

please just tell me if I should just not use noodlers in this pelican. I use it in my faber castell e-motion and it seems ok, but I have only had the pen for a month...the reason I like the noodlers is the vibrant colors and relatively low cost for such a large bottle of ink. I am sure over seas shipping is a bit high, but does amazon not offer free shipping to the EU? anyways I have tried monte verde inks diamine inks and even visconte blue, the more expensive inks seem to write kind of dry, and not have those vibrant pop off the page colors I was looking for. but I would rather have a dull ink that keeps my pen healthy then a vibrant ink that makes my pen ill !!!!

 

 It's up to you...

 

 I must apologize for bringing up this discussion, for Noodler's inks can be rather polarizing...

 

 But I am phenomenal at being paranoid.

 

 But like I said before, it depends on your paper.

 

 If you have cheap paper, don't even consider Noodler's.

 

 ... And any other wet writing ink.

 

 But if you have nice paper, you can try virtually anything you want.

 

 The 140s have an acrylic inner barrel and have synthetic seals, so they should be fine....

 

 But you never know.

 

 EDIT: My splling is terrble.


Edited by AL01, 21 February 2019 - 04:30.


#60 whych

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Posted 21 February 2019 - 04:54

I will say that any super saturated ink runs a higher risk of staining, regardless of the brand. Care should be taken when using such inks and they should not be left in a pen for a prolonged duration. This is where good pen hygiene comes into play. Some colors are more problematic than others. Some brands are more problematic than others. Use what you like, just be mindful that super saturation has its trade offs. I tend to not use Noodlers (except limited applications of Apache Sunset) as per my personal preference. Just not worth the risk to my birds when there are other options out there but thats not to say you cant do so safely.

Pelikans have the advantage that your can unscrew the nib and use a cotton bud to clean the inside of the pen. Getting the residue of ink from the feed is another thing though.

I let Pelikan Violet ink dry in a vintage piston fill Kaweco sport and it took nearly a week of filling the pen with water and leaving it for 12 to 24 hours, flushing and then leave it with water for the violet colour to go.

I would flush the pen and the water was clear, but then leave it a day and the water is dark again.

 

What ink you use in the 140 is up to you- the pen will survive most inks, but if you like changing colours regularly, it's best to use inks that are easy to flush so you don't get remnants of the old ink changing the colour of the ink you are using.

This will show if say you were using a blue colour and change to a yellow based colour. After a day or so you may just find the ink has gained a green tinge.

 

I have used Noodlers in my Pelikans, but have stayed away from Bay State Blue after reading how it stains most things it comes into contact with.

 

Being a fan/collector of vintage Pelikans, Faber Castell/Osmia, Geha, etc I have flushed many pens of old vintage Pelikan blue black (the iron gall type) and the pen has been fine  even pens with steel nibs.







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