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Help - 1960S Mb 149 With Hairline Crack

repair montblanc 149 hairline crack

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#1 shawnee

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Posted 10 February 2019 - 00:01

Okay, guys. I cant catch a break with Montblanc and this one really REALLY hurts. Like seriously gives me chest pain.

I have a 1964-69 Mb 149 with all original parts.

It writes well and I was surprised about how great the condition was until I noticed ink on my thumb. I couldnt figure it out until tonight.

There is a hairline crack in the barrel near the collar. (In the pictures, its under the scotch tape). Im absolutely gutted. And dont know what to do.

So is there a solution? Can the crack be sealed from inside the barrel? Recommendations on who might be able to help?

Michael Masuyama is probably not going to help me out this time - Im assuming I need a MB expert.

Im so sad right now.

Shawnee

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#2 shawnee

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Posted 10 February 2019 - 00:55

This is the best picture I can get of the crack. I put a black rectangle around it so that you could see it without being distracted by a big white strokes rectangle.

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#3 zaddick

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Posted 10 February 2019 - 01:59

It should be fixable as long as it is not into the threads. Brad Torelli can likely fix it, google for his info, or maybe Ron Zorn who frequents these forums and runs Main Street Pens.

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#4 shawnee

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Posted 10 February 2019 - 12:00

Thanks for the feedback. I think I’m going to use Ebay’s 100% guarantee and return it to the seller since I asked the seller up front if there were any cracks, chips, or dents or major damage to the pen and they replied “no”. After the nib on the other 149 and the collar on the 146, I think I’m done buying vintage used MBs for awhile. It’s too bad because it’s a 1964-69 pen that is otherwise very beautiful.

#5 CS388

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Posted 10 February 2019 - 13:00

 I think I’m going to use Ebay’s 100% guarantee and return it to the seller since I asked the seller up front if there were any cracks, chips, or dents or major damage to the pen and they replied “no”

 

Yes. Absolutely.

It's nice, but if it leaks, it's useless as a pen. And repairs are never cheap on these pens.

 

It's always a shame to have to send something so nice back, but the seller should have done their homework. If they'd have declared it as a cracked pen, they would have got far less for it.

 

Good luck.



#6 jmnav

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Posted 10 February 2019 - 13:02

Thanks for the feedback. I think I’m going to use Ebay’s 100% guarantee and return it to the seller since I asked the seller up front if there were any cracks, chips, or dents or major damage to the pen and they replied “no”.

 

Probably your best bet.  Even if it can be repaired, that's a stress point for traversal forces when you write so chances are that it'll break again on this point if you plan to use it.



#7 Zdenek

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Posted 10 February 2019 - 20:28

Fixing a similiar problem: 

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=y4juUteCcE0

 


Edited by Zdenek, 10 February 2019 - 20:30.

Whoever said the pen is mightier than the sword, obviously never encountered automatic weapons." – General D. MacArthur “Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm.” W. Churchill

#8 Wolverine1

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 16:32

Shawnee- yeah, send the pen back to the seller, and then buy a pen from the same vintage from some of the folks on this FPN MB forum. Ask guys like MichaelR, Eric Nicksh etc, if they have a 149 that they would like to sell you.  Also start checking the antique stores in and round Charlotsville. I have over the past few years bought at least 12 MB 149s from a couple of antique stores here in Ann Arbor.

Best of luck.



#9 Michael R.

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 17:38

I do not recommend to repair but to replace with a period correct part. Should cost you at least c. 100-150 US $.

Either get a discount for necessary replacement parts or return.

1960s 149 parts get more difficult to find.

Is this a first generation resin 149?

Don‘t get frustrated. Those are great pens and usually do not cause much problems.

Cheers and good luck

Michael

#10 shawnee

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 20:14

I do not recommend to repair but to replace with a period correct part. Should cost you at least c. 100-150 US $.

Either get a discount for necessary replacement parts or return.

1960s 149 parts get more difficult to find.

Is this a first generation resin 149?

Don‘t get frustrated. Those are great pens and usually do not cause much problems.

Cheers and good luck

Michael

 

Honestly, I don't know. Thanks to the Dating 149 chart, I was able to narrow it down to 1964-69 due to the round ebonite grooves face and shank put it in the 1960s, and with it's 14c tricolor nib and black plastic piston, it can be no earlier than 1964 and no later than 1969. Honestly, it's in great condition except for the crack and it probably could use a slight buff and tweak on the nib BUT I'm tired of fixing MBs already. I got a 149 still with Michael and the 146 with the broken collar had to have the barrel replaced with NOS at the tune of over $100+ bucks so I can't take on another MB project even if I wanted to. I'm not going to lie. The flex on the nib is highly enticing. LOL. BUT THE CRACK. Gaaaaaah!

 

shawnee



#11 shawnee

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 20:17

Shawnee- yeah, send the pen back to the seller, and then buy a pen from the same vintage from some of the folks on this FPN MB forum. Ask guys like MichaelR, Eric Nicksh etc, if they have a 149 that they would like to sell you.  Also start checking the antique stores in and round Charlotsville. I have over the past few years bought at least 12 MB 149s from a couple of antique stores here in Ann Arbor.

Best of luck.

 

Yeah, I have a 149 with an 18k nib that's with Michael Masuyama right now, which hilariously, he has already told me to stay out of broken Montblancs. LOL. Seriously. I need to start taking everyone's advice and stop being a nut.



#12 AndyLogan

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Posted 12 February 2019 - 14:44

 

Yeah, I have a 149 with an 18k nib that's with Michael Masuyama right now, which hilariously, he has already told me to stay out of broken Montblancs. LOL. Seriously. I need to start taking everyone's advice and stop being a nut.

 

I think you should start going to pen shows!, you can see & inspect the vintage merchandise up close. ---My unsolicited advice is, if you do go to a pen show, make a specific list of what you want to purchase, or else you'll go broke, hahaha, Going by this thread, you must exercise more restraint & will power. For example: I've been eyeing the James Dean since late last year,  I even saw Michael R's pics of the James Dean fp, still I was able to hold off for a few more months before finally purchasing the pen (with a 20% discount at LCdC). I am not saying don't buy pens (heavens forbid!) just saying take your time to enjoy the pens that you've got.


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#13 Wolverine1

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Posted 12 February 2019 - 14:51

Shawnee- you should wait till maybe late August when the Washington DC Pen Show takes place. You willl see announcements for it on FPN. This is one of the best shows, with a lot of reliable vendors selling new as well as vintage pens.  So, you should save up, and go to the Show, and buy a MB 149 that is in full working order with no cracks etc, and buy the Pilot pens you had expressed an interest in.



#14 SpecTP

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Posted 12 February 2019 - 15:11

the Baltimore Pen Show is coming up begininng of March. So there's another opportunity.



#15 shawnee

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Posted 12 February 2019 - 16:05

I absolutely agree with the advice and the Washington DC Pen Show is on my to do list for this year. I saw Baltimore in March, but I've got writing commitments that are going to make that almost impossible, but I'm definitely going to the DC pen show. And everyone is right, I need to save the pennies and do my research. 

 

The other thing, and don't laugh or groan, is I'm wondering if it's worth buying a job lot of broken or non-working fountain pens so that I can take them apart and tinker with them. I'm absolutely petrified of taking apart my MB 342 even though it needs to be cleaned because it's one of my favorite favorite pens and it's not cheap; yet, I feel like if this is to be sustainable, I will have to learn how to do some of my own maintenance across all the brands in my collection. I don't know if that's a fool's folly or not.

 

You'd know what I'd love? A weekend course somewhere, where someone taught novices and hobbyists to take apart their pens, clean them, and how to do simple repairs and fixes. I have no problem getting my hands dirty (I do lots of DIY, jewelry, and stained glass work) but I also prefer learning from an experienced person so I don't make a fatal mistake.

 

Anyhow, all of you are right. I need to put the brakes on buying for a bit, and play with the pens I have.

 

shawnee



#16 Wolverine1

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Posted 12 February 2019 - 16:37

You might want to  visit Bert at Bertram's Inkwell, and discuss your proposal with him. I bet Bert could  put you in contact with people in the Metro DC area who could help you learn how to take pens apart and do some repairs. 



#17 shawnee

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Posted 12 February 2019 - 18:53

You might want to  visit Bert at Bertram's Inkwell, and discuss your proposal with him. I bet Bert could  put you in contact with people in the Metro DC area who could help you learn how to take pens apart and do some repairs. 

 

That's a great suggestion so thank you. I didn't even think of that!



#18 siamackz

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Posted 13 February 2019 - 01:07

I absolutely agree with the advice and the Washington DC Pen Show is on my to do list for this year. I saw Baltimore in March, but I've got writing commitments that are going to make that almost impossible, but I'm definitely going to the DC pen show. And everyone is right, I need to save the pennies and do my research. 
 
The other thing, and don't laugh or groan, is I'm wondering if it's worth buying a job lot of broken or non-working fountain pens so that I can take them apart and tinker with them. I'm absolutely petrified of taking apart my MB 342 even though it needs to be cleaned because it's one of my favorite favorite pens and it's not cheap; yet, I feel like if this is to be sustainable, I will have to learn how to do some of my own maintenance across all the brands in my collection. I don't know if that's a fool's folly or not.
 
You'd know what I'd love? A weekend course somewhere, where someone taught novices and hobbyists to take apart their pens, clean them, and how to do simple repairs and fixes. I have no problem getting my hands dirty (I do lots of DIY, jewelry, and stained glass work) but I also prefer learning from an experienced person so I don't make a fatal mistake.
 
Anyhow, all of you are right. I need to put the brakes on buying for a bit, and play with the pens I have.
 
shawnee

Wonderful plan to start learning how to do basic maintenance for your pens! All the best!

My Vintage Montblanc Website--> link

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