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Classic M200 With 18K Two-Tone F Nib

m200

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11 replies to this topic

#1 FlighterGuy

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 15:17

First, I know absolutely zilch about Pelikans.  I’ve been working my way through an estate of ~500 pens and I’m into the P’s.  So, I’ve been wrestling with this M200 off and on for about a week, it was clogged with ink, the piston was locked and finally the piston pulled out the back end.  That’s not supposed to happen so, on go the magnifiers, switch on the lights and $#!+!!, there is a 15mm crack in the barrel (now I know why this pen has been giving me grief).  I’m about to throw the thing in the parts box and that's when I notice that this pen does not have a gold plated steel nib.  It has an 18C-750 F two tone gold nib!!  So I pull out a M800, not even close in size, then an older M200, they are the same size and it screws right in no problem.  So now I have a $100 pen that is worth parts and a nib that's worth even more.  Good thing I didn't throw it in the parts box!!

 



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#2 SenZen

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 16:09

I have an m200/m400 sized Pelikan with an 18k nib, I always assumed it was an m400 but from what I've read it's probably an "old style" m600... Pity about the barrel, but yeah, that nib is worth a pretty penny.

 

fpn_1524938257__pelikan_m600.jpg


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#3 Driften

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 18:08

The m250 came with gold nibs. It could have been it was one of those and not a m200.



#4 FlighterGuy

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 19:11

The m250 came with gold nibs. It could have been it was one of those and not a m200.

 

The M250 came with 14K yellow gold nibs



#5 Barutti

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 19:17

It's m600 dual nib from 1990.
M400 series pens were equipped with 14k gold nibs.

#6 Matlock

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 20:10

I have an early M600 which came with a 14k nib. I bought the pen new in 1991 and, as far as I know, some were sold in the UK with the 14k nib as opposed to the 18k nib which were probably intended for the French market. When I bought it the store thought it was an M400 (they were not a specialist pen store). I had it checked out by Pelikan UK who confirmed it's provenance. 


Peter


#7 FlighterGuy

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 20:59

It's m600 dual nib from 1990.
M400 series pens were equipped with 14k gold nibs.

 

Thanks everyone. Fortunately, there are Pelikan catalogs on-line that confirmed the M600 two tone 18K nibs.  How it ended up in an M200 shall remain a little mystery.  I'll see if I can help it find it's way back home.



#8 sansenri

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 23:02

It happens because Pelikan nibs can be swapped easily.

I put 14k nibs in my M200s and keep wondering whether that makes them M250s...

this is a true 250 (M250 nibs were 14k and single tone gold)

fpn_1549493625__p1170171-3_pelikan_m250_


Edited by sansenri, 06 February 2019 - 23:03.


#9 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 16:29

I have an old small 600....OBB, with an two toned 18 K nib.

 

I took it out to check to see what nib it had...14 or 18K; mono or two toned. Checked the tine spread on my thumb.....then had to grab a '50's 400 semi-flex to check just how flexible that old 600 was. It was a bit more flexible in regular flex than I had expected...............(was not of course semi-flex.)

Mystery solved....W.Germany..... :headsmack: I don't know how I missed that.

Or more than likely, forgot that.

 

Both this 18 K OBB and my Pelikan 200 W. Germany steel OM, are as rumor states, that slight tad more flexible/springy than the normal '90-97 Germany regular flex nibs.

 

 

Nice Green pen.....I'd only saw the black and gold ones.

Though I could be wrong, I was under the impression a mono-tone's 250's nib was still regular flex....and not a modern fat and blobby two-toned gold semi-nail.

 

In a very slight way I do regret not getting a 250 a while back when still being made, but it was just another black and gold pen........and I had more than enough of them, and many of them semi-flex. So buying one new was a bit over my price range (lower then than now)....and eventually I had a couple '90's regular flex nibbed pens, so didn't 'need' one.


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 07 February 2019 - 19:59.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#10 sansenri

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 20:37

Hi there Bo Bo

actually the pen is green and black, but the M250 was made in reverse colours, green cap, section and finial and black barrel

you can see better in this photo (in the other photo the lighting does not show the black so well)

I was lucky to buy just a few M250s before they disappeared or started being sold for unreasonable prices...

fpn_1549571560__p1170168-3_pelikan_m250_



#11 sansenri

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 20:40

 

Thanks everyone. Fortunately, there are Pelikan catalogs on-line that confirmed the M600 two tone 18K nibs.  How it ended up in an M200 shall remain a little mystery.  I'll see if I can help it find it's way back home.

 

Oh btw to find it's way back home you need a vintage M600 (the early models were same size as the M400) and they are not easy to find (cheap).



#12 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 08 February 2019 - 14:47

Mostly, folks have been lucky...getting a 600 when they thought they were getting a '82-97 M400.

Then it's not expensive. :rolleyes:

 

There was a live auction....and being cheap had not bought the auction catalog for the two pens I was interested in.

I made a mistake and thought the first pen in the auction was the black and gold 600.

Not noticing it was silver and gold.............the two auction houses I normally go to, have better photographers. So 'at all costs' I wanted that 600.......... :angry:

 

Well, actually it wasn't at all costs.... I was hoping for 'cheap' which happens occasionally in live auctions....and often one is bidding against dealers who have to make a profit, so one can get it cheaper than one's local Ebay.

 

The auction hall was almost empty, but there were those on phone or computer bidding. Both pens had a start price of E80.

 

My 'limit' for the old small 600 of E135...passed., don't remember when the E10 price jump becomes E20... so really it don't take any time at all at E20 jumps...to hit 200...............which was really my max limit....even if that's foolish. One should have a max limit of 180 or 220.....not 200. :unsure:

OK, I won and at a much more expensive price....so wasn't going to bid on that 1005.

 

The next pen I thought was the 1005....until 'low' bids, in the first 10-15 seconds....told me.... :headsmack: I won a 1005 :wallbash:, with that E200 bid on the pen before.................had I known it...I'd stopped at E150....but thought it the 600. :bunny01: Willing to spend more than it was worth....

In I'd passed them up when I was a foolish 'noobie'. back when a M400 went for E70 and  E100 was way too expensive for a fancy 400.. I didn't understand the 200 back then either.

 

You know you have a chance, when the telephone bids slow down. The going once becomes going twice. I got the 600 for what I expected....E135.....not what I wanted of course....I'd hopes of no one wanting a fountain pen...for E80. I was happy enough with that price.

 

I'm glad I was too cheap to spend E3.00 on a catalog, or I'd not won the 1005. That pen turned out not to be near as huge as I remembered from my B&M, nearly a decade before. In the meantime I'd gotten a few Large pens, so the jump wasn't quite as much as expected.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 






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