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Fountain Pen Ink And Magnetic Closures

magnets fountain pen ink ink flow

7 replies to this topic

#1 Bennett

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 23:40

With increasing frequency a number of fountain pen manufacturers have used magnetic closures for attaching the cap to the barrel.

 

Prior to that, the only magnetic closures I recall seeing - were used on some kit pens. In part, I believe this helped avoid the age-old thread alignment problem between the pen clip and the nib when the cap was posted.

 

I wonder, however, if magnets and fountain pen inks are a good marriage of materials? Some inks have metallic elements such as those that have the special sheen quality. Under certain conditions, couldn't this lead to problems with ink flow, clogged tines and perhaps erosion of the nib and/or other metallic parts near the magnetic closures?

 

Anyone experience problems along these lines they would like to share?

 

Bennett

 

 

 



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#2 OmegaMountain

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Posted 30 January 2019 - 08:41

It shouldn't be an issue with nib erosion at all. The only issue I might see would be iron gall inks though I admittedly don't know how much iron might actually be present in that ink. There have been issues with the magnets themselves rusting on some Visconti pens, if I remember correctly. However, as long as the magnets are encapsulated in resin that shouldn't be a problem either. I think the manufacturers have gotten a lot better with using them over the last few years and I wouldn't worry about it. Just my ¢.02.

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#3 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 30 January 2019 - 22:55

A bit of wax will prevent mars from posting........I've not got nor plan on getting a magnetic cap.

I don't buy new pens.....and by the time it gets used and affordable....don't see going for one.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#4 BrassRatt

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Posted 05 February 2019 - 06:31

Iron as a compound in water solution is not ferromagnetic, is it?  Don't you need a solid particle of some minimum size for ferromagnetism? 



#5 OmegaMountain

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Posted 05 February 2019 - 08:12

Iron as a compound in water solution is not ferromagnetic, is it?  Don't you need a solid particle of some minimum size for ferromagnetism? 


May not be - been too long since I have worried about that kind of chemistry. Might be a problem if the ink were allowed to dry in the pen though.

"Words can light fires in the minds of men. Words can wring tears from the hardest hearts." - Patrick Rothfuss


#6 fabri00

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 06:06

I do not think the shimmering inks are using iron, as iron will turn to rust easily.

#7 jekostas

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Posted 09 February 2019 - 19:49

With increasing frequency a number of fountain pen manufacturers have used magnetic closures for attaching the cap to the barrel.
 
Prior to that, the only magnetic closures I recall seeing - were used on some kit pens. In part, I believe this helped avoid the age-old thread alignment problem between the pen clip and the nib when the cap was posted.
 
I wonder, however, if magnets and fountain pen inks are a good marriage of materials? Some inks have metallic elements such as those that have the special sheen quality. Under certain conditions, couldn't this lead to problems with ink flow, clogged tines and perhaps erosion of the nib and/or other metallic parts near the magnetic closures?
 
Anyone experience problems along these lines they would like to share?
 
Bennett
 
 
 


Shimmering inks don't use metallic elements. That would be a monumentally stupid decision. They use nacre or similar materials.

#8 BaronWulfraed

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Posted 09 February 2019 - 22:04

Shimmering inks don't use metallic elements. That would be a monumentally stupid decision. They use nacre or similar materials.

At best I'd expect micro-ground aluminum, copper, or bronze... However much I might wish for real gold flake.

 

In either case -- none of those are ferrous metals (iron, nickel, cobalt...).





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