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Different Dip Nib For Copperplate Vs. Spencerian


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#1 ItsMeDave

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 18:02

I am currently using a Brause Blue Pumpkin and a Hunt 22 to practice copperplate, I find the Hunt a little scratchy, so I am mostly using the BP.
I also want to throw in some Spencerian practice and am wondering if another nib would be better suited.

FYI, Im using an oblique nib holder.

Suggestions would be welcome.

Cheers,

David

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#2 sidthecat

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 18:11

You might throw that question to the good folks at The Flourish Forum, where the calligraphy obsessives gather.
Good luck.

#3 ItsMeDave

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 19:47

You might throw that question to the good folks at The Flourish Forum, where the calligraphy obsessives gather.
Good luck.


Thanks, first I’ve heard of this forum.

#4 AAAndrew

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Posted 13 January 2019 - 01:00

Depending on how,much shading (thick parts) you want to add to your Spencerian. Spencerian has less shading, so a firmer pen can work for most letters. Both of those pens should also work for Spencerian, but it takes more control. If you can get your hands on a vintage Spencerian #1, that works well. It’s more about practice than tools. I’ve seen quite good Spencerian done with a #2 pencil.

Just go for it!

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#5 stenolearner

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Posted 13 January 2019 - 23:49

With spencerian I hear the Hunt 101 and Leonhardt Principal mentioned a lot. Does anybody know whether Leonhardt got over the QC issues they had?



#6 ItsMeDave

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Posted 14 January 2019 - 03:43

Depending on how,much shading (thick parts) you want to add to your Spencerian. Spencerian has less shading, so a firmer pen can work for most letters. Both of those pens should also work for Spencerian, but it takes more control. If you can get your hands on a vintage Spencerian #1, that works well. It’s more about practice than tools. I’ve seen quite good Spencerian done with a #2 pencil.

Just go for it!

Seeing as how I’m a complete novice, I’ll leave the search for good quality Spencerian #1’s for later.
I’m going with a Zebra G to start.

#7 Honeybadgers

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Posted 14 January 2019 - 07:36

The zebra G will be smoother and more forgiving than any other dip nib I've ever come across.

 

the brause rose is a bit of a hard-start pain but it is smooth once it gets going.

 

The leonardt principal EF will throw down huge shades but it can be toothy.

 

Honestly, get used to scratchy nibs. they are needlepoints with hairlines and no tipping, most will never be "smooth"

 

Or stick with zebra G's. Those are the only dip nibs with solid flex (Easily enough for spencerian, not quite enough for large print copperplate) that are properly "smooth"



#8 ItsMeDave

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Posted Yesterday, 00:03

The zebra G will be smoother and more forgiving than any other dip nib I've ever come across.
 
the brause rose is a bit of a hard-start pain but it is smooth once it gets going.
 
The leonardt principal EF will throw down huge shades but it can be toothy.
 
Honestly, get used to scratchy nibs. they are needlepoints with hairlines and no tipping, most will never be "smooth"
 
Or stick with zebra G's. Those are the only dip nibs with solid flex (Easily enough for spencerian, not quite enough for large print copperplate) that are properly "smooth"


The Zebra G feels good for Spencerian.
I’ve been using a Brause blue pumpkin for Copperplate and have been happy with it, is the rose much different?






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