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When Did Japan Start Using Latin Scrip To Mark Their Pen Nib Width?


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#1 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 11 January 2019 - 13:57

When did Japan start using Latin scrip to mark their pen nib width?

 

I know they started making fountain pens in 1912. When West was IN.

 

Did they use western markings instead of Japanese characters from the start?

Did they use Japanese characters on their fountain pens, during the height of Japanese nationalism '20-40's?

 

 


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany      Info on Bock nibs

 

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#2 peerless1

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Posted 11 January 2019 - 14:39

Western markings on nibs have been used for over 100 years. Japanese characters were used somewhat during the latter years of World War II when the government dissuaded industry from using Western writing.

 

There are a number of pens from the 1920s in my collection and all have Western markings on nibs and clips.

 

Suggest obtaining Lambrou FPOJ to see some pictures of vintage nibs. Good reference material.


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#3 BaronWulfraed

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Posted 11 January 2019 - 22:00

As I commented elsewhere -- I have five Platinum pens that do have Japanese markings on the nibs: two Carbon Desk pens, two "Modern Maki-e", and one "Elegant" (basic black base model used for the Modern Maki-e series).



#4 mke

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 01:27

> Platinum pens that do have Japanese markings on the nibs

Please show if possible. Thanks.

 

The Bamboo weaving pen has the word Izumo on the nib - but this is recent stuff.



#5 BaronWulfraed

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 04:47

> Platinum pens that do have Japanese markings on the nibs

Please show if possible. Thanks.

 

The Bamboo weaving pen has the word Izumo on the nib - but this is recent stuff.

20190111_232849.jpg

20190111_233018.jpg

 

Apologies for the cellphone images -- photoshopped for 200% unsharp masking

 

No Western EF, F, or M to be seen (though they were billed as such on Pen Chalet and Fahrney's). The Carbons are EF and M, the "Elegant" is EF, and the two "Modern Maki-E" are F (per my records)

 

The oldest of the five ("Elegant") was bought in 2005.


Edited by BaronWulfraed, 12 January 2019 - 04:54.


#6 peerless1

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Posted 13 January 2019 - 23:57

Only used for nib sizes. Yes. It seems this was a practice only used by Platinum from the late 1960s onward. Sailor used numbers in the 1970s and Pilot used Western letters.

 

Many Japanese  pens going back over 100 years used Western markings, if marking of nib sizes were used at all. Most 1940s and earlier pens did not use nib size at all.


stan

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