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Fountain Pen Identification

fountain pen identification

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14 replies to this topic

#1 Fluffyhoovy

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Posted 30 November 2018 - 13:52

Hi I got this pen at a car boot sale and want to know what it is but honestly have no idea and says nothing on it except made in France and iridium point that doesn't help much

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Edited by Fluffyhoovy, 30 November 2018 - 13:58.


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#2 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 30 November 2018 - 14:49

A better close up of the nib might help, and a better close up of the clip.

Is there anything written on the pen body or the top of the cap?

:W2FPN:

 

How many fountain pens do you have?

We are a nosy bunch.....but if you have few, we could tell you this...if a few more, then something else.


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 30 November 2018 - 14:51.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#3 PaulS

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Posted 30 November 2018 - 15:29

can't offer much help I'm afraid, other than to say that if your pen takes cartridges then it's going to be post 1960 ish - although Waterman used this filling system a tad earlier in the '50s.             It's possible that the type of cartridge inside this pen might help narrow the field, but you may be looking at an inexpensive pen, and have to settle for an unknown provenance.             My thoughts, date wise, are perhaps 1980 - 1990, but I'm really only guessing, and iridium nibs are commonplace on less expensive f.ps. over the past 30 - 40 years.           Probably all better quality f.ps. carry the makers name somewhere on the pen.

 

However, someone may know the origin of your pen  -  fingers crossed. 

 

P.S.    welcome to FPN from me too.


Edited by PaulS, 30 November 2018 - 15:30.


#4 Fluffyhoovy

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Posted 30 November 2018 - 15:46

It does use cartridges and the nib just has iridium point on it, nothing on the pen body and an E inside a U on the cap and nothing on the understand side of the clip.It does click to open close and post no screw in only to get to the cartridge if that is any help. And thanks for the warm welcome it is greatly appreciated.

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Edited by Fluffyhoovy, 30 November 2018 - 16:18.


#5 Fluffyhoovy

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Posted 30 November 2018 - 16:17

Well since you asked I also have this other pen of which I would like to know the origin I also got it at a car boot sale. This has nothing at all on it except that the nib and feed are the exact same as the one above although the nib is one tone steel unlike the two tone one above.

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Edited by Fluffyhoovy, 30 November 2018 - 16:20.


#6 PaulS

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Posted 30 November 2018 - 16:41

appreciate the keenness  -  been there too :)   ……… but people here prefer separate posts for different pens, usually.

 

The ball-ended clip on your second pen is a design found commonly during 1930 - 40s, but not sure if the rest of the pen is likewise - is this a rubber sac pen or cartridge  -  the nib is obviously a lot later, and appears to be another possibly German made iridium job.      The gilt colour on the first pen is probably a very thin gold plating - looks good but disappears quickly if the nib is polished frequently, and nibs are the most frequently replaced component of a f.p., and non-original parts can be troublesome at times - like now.

 

I think we are in the same situation with this brown pen - going to be a non-starter unless someone recognizes the model.             You're making a v.g. start, and you'll discover quickly that having a name or logo on a pen is a big advantage when looking for an i.d. :)


Edited by PaulS, 30 November 2018 - 16:45.


#7 Fluffyhoovy

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Posted 30 November 2018 - 16:41

Also I was wondering I have this Parker vector roller ball and I was wondering if I could open the cartridge up and fill it with fountain pen ink, does anyone know of such a thing?

#8 Fluffyhoovy

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Posted 30 November 2018 - 16:43

It's a cartridge no bladder. And thanks for the heads up, but doesn't that make too many posts for the servers if everyone creates one for a new unidentified pen or do they delete old ones?

Edited by Fluffyhoovy, 30 November 2018 - 16:44.


#9 PaulS

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Posted 30 November 2018 - 17:12

heavens !  you should ask me already as to the mechanics of FPN hosting/server  -  I think these guys are generous when it comes to p.c. space.

I think the bottom line is just to try and separate posts for different pens - it may save some confusion - though I've been guilty of going 'off-topic' all too frequently - it's easy to do when you're keen.

Have a look at the various sub-forums and you'll see how folk tend to post and the extent of wandering off-topic or not.

 

Sorry, no experience of opening up roller-ball refills and topping up with f.p. ink  -  I'd suggest caution since the latter has very low viscosity  -  make sure you do this over the sink and when the o.h. is absent - just in case ink doesn't stay where you want it to.

Roller-ball refills are available commonly, so I guess it's just a case of experimentation?


Edited by PaulS, 30 November 2018 - 17:24.


#10 Fluffyhoovy

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Posted 30 November 2018 - 17:46

Okay thank you I'll see what can be done

#11 jar

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Posted 01 December 2018 - 00:24

Both look to be NoNami's, most likely made to faintly resemble a better known pen.  They can be nice writers but determining brand is likely impossible; many were even sold under several different names.


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#12 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 01 December 2018 - 12:09

NoNami's,......OK the first time I've noticed that.

What is important, is how does it write...or them.

 

I have labeled NoNami's, that no one knows of....that are good writers.

Is the second one a sac pen??? or Piston???

 

Third or second tier pens can be good.....not quite as sturdy as first tier or name pens, but not everyone had a lot of money to buy a pen with.

Germany did make cheap nibs for a while..........then the Chinese copied that.

 

There are many levels of good when it comes to nibs. Something to worry about a bit later on.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#13 BaylorBear22

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Posted 13 February 2019 - 20:02

I'm trying to identify this pen that I just bought. I don't have hands on it just yet but would like to get an idea of what I bought. Thanks for any help!!

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Edited by BaylorBear22, 13 February 2019 - 20:02.


#14 sansenri

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Posted 13 February 2019 - 20:50

the nib ornament oddly resembles that on early Bexley gold nibs

(but it's clear it's neither gold or Bexley)

fpn_1550089743__bexley_cable_twist_blue_

 

nibs bearing iridium point marking are usually Chinese/Taiwanese

(even when the marking is Iridium Point Germany...)

http://www.fountainp...ium-point-nibs/

 

Schmidt nibs bear Iridium point marking often, but the wording is usually Schmidt Iridium point

http://www.fountainp...ium-point-nibs/

fpn_1550090935__schmidt_iridium_point.jp


Edited by sansenri, 13 February 2019 - 20:52.


#15 flipper_gv

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Posted 14 February 2019 - 00:09

First one looks like a no name copy of a Waterman Le Man 200.







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