Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies


FPN appearing slow

Dearest Member or Visitor of the little Fountain Pen Nut house on the digital prairie,

Due to a continuing DDoS attack, FPN could be moving only slowly. Hosting Support is dealing with this. The earlier reported hardware issue has been fixed. Apologies for the inconvenience.

Warm regards, the FPN Moderator & Admin Team






Photo

The Waterman Edson Vs The Carene


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Nick_Green

Nick_Green

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 91 posts
  • Location:Cape Town, South Africa
  • Flag:

Posted 12 October 2018 - 10:08

In this video I compare the Edson and Carene Fountain Pens:

 

 


Edited by Nick_Green, 12 October 2018 - 10:34.


Sponsored Content

#2 bbs

bbs

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,117 posts
  • Location:Near Sevenoaks, Kent
  • Flag:

Posted 12 October 2018 - 12:18

Thanks, an interesting comparison! I have both pens and prefer the Carene - it fits my hand better but also seems better balanced and the nib is not so much of a nail as my Edson's. I like the Carene's lines and its colours better too.

#3 Force

Force

    Fergus 1998-2015

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,008 posts
  • Location:England, UK
  • Flag:

Posted 12 October 2018 - 12:38

Sorry but the filling of the Carene is vague. The OP started with a full or part full converter. The first move showed the piston being wound in and then out so the section feed was therefore already full of ink.

 

To fill a totally inkless section and converter,

 

1. Wind the piston fully in.

2. Place the nib vertical into ink bottle.

3. Wind the piston fully out. 

 

Repeat 1 and 3 a couple of times.

 

4. With the piston wound out, remove from ink bottle.

5. Invert the assembly so that the nib is pointing up. Wipe away excess ink.

6. Give the section grip a couple of finger flicks.

7. Slowly wind piston in until you see ink appear at the breather hole.

8. Place nib vertical back into the ink bottle.

9. Slowly wind the piston fully out.

10. I normally wind the piston one turn back in at this stage to prevent excess ink flow on first use.

 

Repeat 7 and 9 a couple of times, then 10.

 

Now the section and converter are both fully loaded.



#4 pseudo88

pseudo88

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,157 posts

Posted 12 October 2018 - 14:47

Thanks for this! The Carène looks really nice in blue, I don't think I'd seen it in that colour before, luckily for my wallet. The Edson is a bit over the top, in design and price, but still, an interesting pen.


"The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt."

B. Russell

#5 Nick_Green

Nick_Green

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 91 posts
  • Location:Cape Town, South Africa
  • Flag:

Posted 12 October 2018 - 16:07

The Carene is definitely the more practical of these two pens.

 

Tomorrow, I'm going to compare the Carene to the Parker Sonnet and I think this will be a rather interesting comparison, as I inked my Parker sonnet for the first time today, and I must say that I'm extremely impressed with it's performance! (The nib has allot more give than that of the Carene, and it's ink delivery is very similar.)



#6 Nick_Green

Nick_Green

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 91 posts
  • Location:Cape Town, South Africa
  • Flag:

Posted 13 October 2018 - 06:23

Sorry but the filling of the Carene is vague. The OP started with a full or part full converter. The first move showed the piston being wound in and then out so the section feed was therefore already full of ink.

 

To fill a totally inkless section and converter,

 

1. Wind the piston fully in.

2. Place the nib vertical into ink bottle.

3. Wind the piston fully out. 

 

Repeat 1 and 3 a couple of times.

 

4. With the piston wound out, remove from ink bottle.

5. Invert the assembly so that the nib is pointing up. Wipe away excess ink.

6. Give the section grip a couple of finger flicks.

7. Slowly wind piston in until you see ink appear at the breather hole.

8. Place nib vertical back into the ink bottle.

9. Slowly wind the piston fully out.

10. I normally wind the piston one turn back in at this stage to prevent excess ink flow on first use.

 

Repeat 7 and 9 a couple of times, then 10.

 

Now the section and converter are both fully loaded.

 

 

I apologise for not adequately demonstrating the inking process to be followed for this pen.

 

I made this video the properly demonstrate the process, I hope it gets your approval:

 



#7 Force

Force

    Fergus 1998-2015

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,008 posts
  • Location:England, UK
  • Flag:

Posted 13 October 2018 - 08:05

Excellent and precisely to my method.

 

Ummmm WatermAn...

 

I think the lacquer colour must be Ultramarine

 

Obsession Blue



#8 Nick_Green

Nick_Green

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 91 posts
  • Location:Cape Town, South Africa
  • Flag:

Posted 13 October 2018 - 10:20

Excellent and precisely to my method.

 

Ummmm WatermAn...

 

 

Sorry about that, it's fixed!



#9 RMN

RMN

    Ancient Artifact

  • FPN Super Moderators

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,888 posts
  • Location:the Netherlands
  • Flag:

Posted 15 October 2018 - 20:44

Ah, that's better. I was going to comment earlier but couldn't because FPN was unreachable.

 

 

D.ick


~

 

Freedom exists by virtue of self limitation.

 

 

~

 


#10 Caeruleum

Caeruleum

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 85 posts
  • Flag:

Posted Yesterday, 19:12

Thank you.






Sponsored Content




|