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Calling All Lefties! Not Just Fountain Pens

lefty overwriter waverly ergonomics rollerball gel fountain pen

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#21 JayKay3000

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Posted 03 October 2018 - 22:36

I've never found it a problem to be a left handed writer (except for those raised spines or rings on the 'wrong' side :lol:

 

As for fountain pens and inks I use whatever pen and ink I want without covering myself in the stuff. If you want to use a fountain pen in my experience as a left handed writer you have to write the correct way.

 

But I only use standard nibs like medium and fine. I've never needed, tried  or been interested in specialty nibs.

 

I use all pens and pens previously used by right handed users without problems. OK - so wet inks are a problem, because if they take so long to dry when you turn the page you get two copies of the same text :blush:.

 

My daily is a Parker 75 that had over 20 years use by (probably) a right handed user and I'm certain it's not a left handed model and it works perfectly fine. Till this topic I'd never even given the topic a second thought as it's never been an issue.



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#22 SenZen

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Posted 03 October 2018 - 22:52

I've never found it a problem to be a left handed writer (except for those raised spines or rings on the 'wrong' side :lol:

 

As for fountain pens and inks I use whatever pen and ink I want without covering myself in the stuff. If you want to use a fountain pen in my experience as a left handed writer you have to write the correct way.

 

But I only use standard nibs like medium and fine. I've never needed, tried  or been interested in specialty nibs.

 

I use all pens and pens previously used by right handed users without problems. OK - so wet inks are a problem, because if they take so long to dry when you turn the page you get two copies of the same text :blush:.

 

My daily is a Parker 75 that had over 20 years use by (probably) a right handed user and I'm certain it's not a left handed model and it works perfectly fine. Till this topic I'd never even given the topic a second thought as it's never been an issue.

 

Thanks, I'm not a lefty and do like Clairefontaine and the like, but as I don't have a lot of patience I use a rocket blower (originally designed to clean camera sensors). I just got a milleraies 75 and I'm really liking it but my friend was not impressed, perhaps it's too small. Didn't even like the ciselé I showed him on a computer, which I drool over.


"The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt."

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#23 Jhurt

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Posted 04 October 2018 - 02:18

I am not a lefty but have a friend who is, and is intrigued, I'm not sure if by fountain pens or just worried about my sanity with (only) 25 inks and pens. I have read and watched videos about lefties and writing, pushing vs pulling, my sincere commiserations, I didn't know it could be such an ordeal.
 
I have some specific questions, in particular for lefty overwriters:

  • What is your favorite pen (fountain or other)? Why?
  • I've read about the advantages of quicker drying inks; do you prefer rollerballs? Gel pens?
  • Are there more comfortable pens for lefty overwriters? What aspects to look for? Cushioned sections?
  • More expensive pens seem to be fountain pen variants: do these make sense ergonomically for lefties? For instance a Pelikan Souverain or Parker Sonnet rollerball.
  • Any lefties using Sheaffer Triumhps or Pilots with WA nibs ("upturned"or "Waverly type" nibs)? Do these work for you?
  • Strictly stick to quickly drying paper? No Clairefontaine for you?
  • Is it worth the hassle? Just get a cheap gel pen and forget about it?
  • Any other aspects I should look into?
 
I am doing this as if it were an analysis of consumer experiences, following specific goals (design, comfort, practicality, statement pen). Budget is $100 USD.
 
Thanks!

I’m an underwriting lefty—I turn my paper about 45 degrees, so smearing is not a huge problem. I am new to fountain pens, so I haven’t done enough writing with different pens to have a favorite. I’ve seen some left-handed nibs on Pelikan Jrs and some other pen that I can’t remember and maybe one day I’ll get one. But, like most of the others who replied, I adapt! However, I took a calligraphy course years ago and my instructor had me buy a Platignum left-handed pen and nibs. She said it would be much easier for me to get the proper angle to make the letters with the lefty nibs.

Because of my newbie status, I am totally unfamiliar with the various papers. And as far as gel pens, I love them, usually going for an Energel extra fine. No great expense needed.

As someone else said, I think you might be overthinking. I’ll bet your friend will adapt to whatever pens he/she owns. If you are considering giving the pen as a gift, just get your friend the same pen that you would enjoy —they’ll adapt!

#24 Chmara

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Posted 05 October 2018 - 00:50

As a lefty at age 17 I gave up on fountain pens settling for ball point and typewriter.  I still smeared Ballpoint ink as in those days 60 years ago it was still an oily, globby ink in the refill that took, well, sometime weeks to dry.

 

Now 60 years later I have been using fountain pens again,  starting on my 76th Birthday.  Using them in the past year I have asked myself and others the same type fo questions as we see above -- and thanks to members here and the net -- I have some answers.  (BTW, Honeybadgers has been of a great and wonderful help.)

 

The comfort of the pen, except for those with finger-grooved for right handers sections, has had little to do with my writing.  The choice of nib has been essential for me -- and my desire to find a flex that I can afford that will consistently work AND be in my very small budget goes only partially fulfilled, but again, thanks to Honeybadgers I am much closer than when I started.  What is needed is developing not just writing skill, but adjustment and modification skill to apply those things you can learn of why and how a modern fountain pen works and is engineered.

 

Not that, for a lefty every pen must be a Frankenpen, but recognizing where specific modifications such as nib smoothing and working with the feed may apply.  Sometimes these are as important as hand position and speed.

 

I do not believe that ANY fountain pen can come out of the box (new) and work for a lefty without some work.

 

The other thing this past year has taught me is to SLOW DOWN -- approach each letter with concentration until complete muscle memory for shape, angle, speed and pressure work for you with the specific pen you choose and have tuned to your liking.

 

I am an underwriter -- sometimes slogan to side writing when trying to cram stuff on a page -- but realize that ink takes drying time. So wet writing and broad nibs give me problems -- and finding smooth fine nibs in inexpensive pens is arduous.  I probably will still be working on getting a good flex nib and style upon my death -- finally curling head down on my writing desk -- Frankenpen in hand filled with Noodler's X Feather black.


Edited by Chmara, 05 October 2018 - 00:52.


#25 SenZen

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Posted 05 October 2018 - 13:39

I’m an underwriting lefty—I turn my paper about 45 degrees, so smearing is not a huge problem. I am new to fountain pens, so I haven’t done enough writing with different pens to have a favorite. I’ve seen some left-handed nibs on Pelikan Jrs and some other pen that I can’t remember and maybe one day I’ll get one. But, like most of the others who replied, I adapt! However, I took a calligraphy course years ago and my instructor had me buy a Platignum left-handed pen and nibs. She said it would be much easier for me to get the proper angle to make the letters with the lefty nibs.

Because of my newbie status, I am totally unfamiliar with the various papers. And as far as gel pens, I love them, usually going for an Energel extra fine. No great expense needed.

As someone else said, I think you might be overthinking. I’ll bet your friend will adapt to whatever pens he/she owns. If you are considering giving the pen as a gift, just get your friend the same pen that you would enjoy —they’ll adapt!

 

Thanks!


"The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt."

B. Russell

#26 SenZen

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Posted 05 October 2018 - 13:42

As a lefty at age 17 I gave up on fountain pens settling for ball point and typewriter.  I still smeared Ballpoint ink as in those days 60 years ago it was still an oily, globby ink in the refill that took, well, sometime weeks to dry.

 

Now 60 years later I have been using fountain pens again,  starting on my 76th Birthday.  Using them in the past year I have asked myself and others the same type fo questions as we see above -- and thanks to members here and the net -- I have some answers.  (BTW, Honeybadgers has been of a great and wonderful help.)

 

The comfort of the pen, except for those with finger-grooved for right handers sections, has had little to do with my writing.  The choice of nib has been essential for me -- and my desire to find a flex that I can afford that will consistently work AND be in my very small budget goes only partially fulfilled, but again, thanks to Honeybadgers I am much closer than when I started.  What is needed is developing not just writing skill, but adjustment and modification skill to apply those things you can learn of why and how a modern fountain pen works and is engineered.

 

Not that, for a lefty every pen must be a Frankenpen, but recognizing where specific modifications such as nib smoothing and working with the feed may apply.  Sometimes these are as important as hand position and speed.

 

I do not believe that ANY fountain pen can come out of the box (new) and work for a lefty without some work.

 

The other thing this past year has taught me is to SLOW DOWN -- approach each letter with concentration until complete muscle memory for shape, angle, speed and pressure work for you with the specific pen you choose and have tuned to your liking.

 

I am an underwriter -- sometimes slogan to side writing when trying to cram stuff on a page -- but realize that ink takes drying time. So wet writing and broad nibs give me problems -- and finding smooth fine nibs in inexpensive pens is arduous.  I probably will still be working on getting a good flex nib and style upon my death -- finally curling head down on my writing desk -- Frankenpen in hand filled with Noodler's X Feather black.

 

Thanks! Slowing down is important, it also helped me as I retrained myself.


"The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt."

B. Russell

#27 torstar

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Posted 05 October 2018 - 15:42

 

Thanks! By Claire I guess you refer to Her Highness Clairefontaine? As opposed to that toilet paper Moleskine? I'm just kidding to each his or her own, but I do like Clairefontaine. I keep a piece of paper folded in two under my hand as I write, as any oils make it impossible for any pen to write on it. If you haven't tried it Tomoe River is awesome and dries more quickly, as does Fabriano. I'm going to see if my friend tries several of my pens and decides which one is more comfortable, no Edsons, alas, and my friend's budget is $100 USD.

 

I enjoy using both Claire and Moleskin.  All product have problems if we do not respect their inherent limits.

 

Purchased a couple hundred sheets off a FPN member years ago, it's a bit much for my current interests, I have about half remaining. 

 

Good tip on keeping sweat off the bottom half of the page!



#28 sidthecat

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Posted 07 October 2018 - 17:40

Im an outlier in many ways, and my journey has been long and strange. Im greatly enamoured with vintage flex pens, including some modified with dip nibs, because they can make your writing look beautiful. That said, Ive recently developed a style based on Edward Johnstons casual script, which ironically doesnt require a flexible nib to look good. Whats useful about this style is that its easy for an overwriter
fpn_1530982543__file_jul_06_8_31_25_pm.j[/URL

#29 SenZen

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Posted 07 October 2018 - 17:45

Im an outlier in many ways, and my journey has been long and strange. Im greatly enamoured with vintage flex pens, including some modified with dip nibs, because they can make your writing look beautiful. That said, Ive recently developed a style based on Edward Johnstons casual script, which ironically doesnt require a flexible nib to look good. Whats useful about this style is that its easy for an overwriter
fpn_1530982543__file_jul_06_8_31_25_pm.j[/URL

 

Interesting!


"The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt."

B. Russell

#30 SenZen

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Posted 07 October 2018 - 17:49

Thanks everyone, after trying several of my pens the decision came down to a Faber Castell Ambition rollerball in pearwood. Besides seeing how it writes I think it might also be compatible with Pilot G2 refills which come in interesting colours (anyone know?).


"The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt."

B. Russell

#31 sidthecat

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Posted 07 October 2018 - 18:15

Heres a much better example of Johnstons script, from the cover of, ironically, Lessons In Formal Writing.fpn_1538935799__f3794c01-ea73-462c-9bbd-

#32 Megaten

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 19:50

Lefty here. When it comes to pens, I always used gel pens like the Sarasa and such as they are pretty quick drying. Currently I use a Sheaffer Targa, and I wouldnt say I have any preference when it comes to my positioning, as I write the way I would with the Sarasa. I always write on cheap paper, so drying is usually quick. I dont have a preference on a grip, as I like them from ribbed to smooth like on the Targa. I had a first gen Triumph vac at one point (1944?) but it wasnt restored and I basically just dump ink in instead of using the broken vac. It wrote alright for me, but perhaps the scratchiness was due to age and negligence (Spent way too much on it as I was still a newbie. Nice striated pattern though).

 

So far, good experiences. And honestly, I dont mind ink on my hands that often anyway.



#33 SenZen

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 22:03

The Pilot G2 refills fit the Ambition perfectly, by the way, and they have a few interesting colours.


"The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt."

B. Russell

#34 torstar

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Posted 13 February 2019 - 23:21

The Pilot G2 refills fit the Ambition perfectly, by the way, and they have a few interesting colours.

 

Very good!

 

Lots of gel refills can fit with a little snip here and there.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: lefty, overwriter, waverly, ergonomics, rollerball, gel, fountain pen



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