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It Had To Happen, Parker 75 Advice

parker 75 milleraies silver fine nib maintenance

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31 replies to this topic

#1 SenZen

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Posted 21 September 2018 - 21:19

To the point: any advice before I start using a Parker 75 bought used? One with the thinner section, fine size nib.

 

Longer story: I'd given up on the 75 given that I have no way of trying them in person, and they are apparently thinner than Sonnets, of which I have two. But... I came across one for a low price, which seemed in good nick, and in the design that intrigued me the most, milleraies (yes, ciselé looks awesome too). So... Instead of wisely saving for the one pen missing in my collection, a Waterman Carène, there I go blowing the budget... Which was already seriously dented by a Pelikan m205 and a couple of Lamy Studios...

 

Soooo... This might take a while to get to me, but since it's a used pen, what would you recommend?

 

1. Dunk the section overnight, nib and all in water before anything else, to loosen any dried ink?

 

2. Try to remove the nib and feed first, by pulling it out, and cleaning them separately? It pulls out straight? This is what I would do with most of my pens, but I don't want to break anything. I did break a feed inside a Sonnet section, probably my fountain pen low point.

 

3. I understand the nib and feed are not easy to disassemble so better leave them well alone?

 

4. Very specific info: are these pens rather dry or rather wet? I am very particular about how inks come out, so for instance Ama Iro and Ajisai looked terrible (to me) on most (wet) pens, look consistently great with EF Studios, while Tsuyu Kusa really came into its own with a wet Professional Gear. I will definitely stay away from difficult inks which leave crud or sediments, like Rouge Hematite or Équinoxe 6; if you're happy or unhappy with the ink in your 75, please tell me about it.

 

5. I think this is silver coated? How does one clean that, if needed?

 

6. Will a modern Pelikan Parker converter work fine with these?

 

Any other tips? Hopefully it won't be too thin for my L glove sized hands, otherwise... I suppose I'd have to give it away, and I'll probably never hear the end of it.

 

Thanks in advance!

 

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Edited by pseudo88, 22 September 2018 - 01:15.

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#2 TimeoDanaos

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Posted 21 September 2018 - 21:48

1) definitely let the section soak overnight

2) don't try to remove the nib+feed until you're sure it's clean. Even then, why would you want to? You certainly don't need to, in my limited experience with 75's.

3) no need to try to disassemble anything. Most probably it will work without trouble.

4) my 75 (medium nib/66) is neither wet nor really dry. It's not like a nice gushing Pelikan gold nib. I tend to prefer wetter writers, so I don't really use it all that much.

5) no idea, mine is the ciselé, which is solid silver. Silver is easy to clean with a silver polishing cloth. But I don't know about silver plating. Ask your local jeweler.

6) nope, you need a Parker converter or Parker cartridges.

The only other thing I can come up with: remember that the nib is supposed to be able to twist to suit your handwriting position. But be aware that it's actually harder to ascertain what your standard position is than you would think. And btw the nib is quite rigid, so don't try any flexy stuff unless you really hate the pen.

Enjoy!

#3 pajaro

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Posted 22 September 2018 - 01:04

Why not just fill it and try it out before playing pen repairman and taking it apart?  Sorry if that sounds sarcastic, but why not try it first.  Every time you disassemble something there exists the possibility of incurring inadvertent damage.  Stripping something, cracking something, breaking something.  It is your stuff, though.  I usually remember that Stuff Happens In Testing, which makes an appropriate acronym.


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#4 SenZen

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Posted 22 September 2018 - 01:16

1) definitely let the section soak overnight

2) don't try to remove the nib+feed until you're sure it's clean. Even then, why would you want to? You certainly don't need to, in my limited experience with 75's.

3) no need to try to disassemble anything. Most probably it will work without trouble.

4) my 75 (medium nib/66) is neither wet nor really dry. It's not like a nice gushing Pelikan gold nib. I tend to prefer wetter writers, so I don't really use it all that much.

5) no idea, mine is the ciselé, which is solid silver. Silver is easy to clean with a silver polishing cloth. But I don't know about silver plating. Ask your local jeweler.

6) nope, you need a Parker converter or Parker cartridges.

The only other thing I can come up with: remember that the nib is supposed to be able to twist to suit your handwriting position. But be aware that it's actually harder to ascertain what your standard position is than you would think. And btw the nib is quite rigid, so don't try any flexy stuff unless you really hate the pen.

Enjoy!

 

Awesome info, thank you!


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#5 SenZen

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Posted 22 September 2018 - 01:17

Why not just fill it and try it out before playing pen repairman and taking it apart?  Sorry if that sounds sarcastic, but why not try it first.  Every time you disassemble something there exists the possibility of incurring inadvertent damage.  Stripping something, cracking something, breaking something.  It is your stuff, though.  I usually remember that Stuff Happens In Testing, which makes an appropriate acronym.

 

No, it's a good point, I guess I'm just used to cleaning pens a lot as I search for the perfect ink for them. It makes sense to see if it works and then clean it. Thanks!


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#6 alexwi

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Posted 22 September 2018 - 01:40

Hi Pseudo!

 

Let's see...

 

1. I would give it a good flush. Not that I wouldn't want to play with a new pen, but from something I read a few days ago, ink mold in a pen will contaminate any ink bottle you put it in, and that bottle will, in turn, contaminate the next pen that goes into it. If you have a Parker cartridge, however, go right ahead, but remember to flush it thoroughly before you ink it from one of your bottles.

 

2. The nib assembly (nib + feed) are just inserted into the section. You can pull it straight or turn it in any direction while pulling. If it doesn't go out with what you'd consider normal force, then it's stuck. What is normal force? Whatever doesn't cause you pain if applied to an earlobe.

 

3. The nib assembly's desired to stay in one piece varies from pen to pen. I had one that took a week of soaking, rapidoeze, and an ultrasonic cleaner to pull apart, and I had another that came apart as I tried to pull lthe assembly out of the section in order to wash it for the first time. Disassembling the nib assembly isn't necessary unless the pen's not working.

 

4. Wet or dry? Each has its own quirks, but on average, I'd say that they're, uhm, average. I like them. Mine tend to be similar to my two Sonnets (when they're not acting up; the Sonnets, that is).

 

5. I believe that the 75 Cisele is made of silver. Whatever you do, do not use a silver cleaning paste or liquid! It will remove the black patina from the grooves. Use one of those silver polishing rags they sell on amazon, which are pre-treated with something that cleans silver.

 

6. All parker converters and cartridges work with this pen.

 

Have fun!

 

alex



#7 DasKaltblut

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Posted 22 September 2018 - 02:11

Hi Pseudo!
 
5. I believe that the 75 Cisele is made of silver. Whatever you do, do not use a silver cleaning paste or liquid! It will remove the black patina from the grooves. Use one of those silver polishing rags they sell on amazon, which are pre-treated with something that cleans silver.
 
Have fun!
 
alex


I think the OPs pen is not the Cisele, but dang I see this all the time on Ebay - all the black polished out, then they want $200 for the pen...

#8 pajaro

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Posted 22 September 2018 - 03:19

 

No, it's a good point, I guess I'm just used to cleaning pens a lot as I search for the perfect ink for them. It makes sense to see if it works and then clean it. Thanks!

 

I have broken a few feeds, bent a couple of nibs and cracked at least one section in the process of pulling nib and feed for cleaning or some nib change.  I think every pull of a friction fit nib and feed might affect the friction fit.  I try not to do things that I know I don't have to do.


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#9 SenZen

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Posted 22 September 2018 - 14:07

Hi Pseudo!

 

Let's see...

 

1. I would give it a good flush. Not that I wouldn't want to play with a new pen, but from something I read a few days ago, ink mold in a pen will contaminate any ink bottle you put it in, and that bottle will, in turn, contaminate the next pen that goes into it. If you have a Parker cartridge, however, go right ahead, but remember to flush it thoroughly before you ink it from one of your bottles.

 

2. The nib assembly (nib + feed) are just inserted into the section. You can pull it straight or turn it in any direction while pulling. If it doesn't go out with what you'd consider normal force, then it's stuck. What is normal force? Whatever doesn't cause you pain if applied to an earlobe.

 

3. The nib assembly's desired to stay in one piece varies from pen to pen. I had one that took a week of soaking, rapidoeze, and an ultrasonic cleaner to pull apart, and I had another that came apart as I tried to pull lthe assembly out of the section in order to wash it for the first time. Disassembling the nib assembly isn't necessary unless the pen's not working.

 

4. Wet or dry? Each has its own quirks, but on average, I'd say that they're, uhm, average. I like them. Mine tend to be similar to my two Sonnets (when they're not acting up; the Sonnets, that is).

 

5. I believe that the 75 Cisele is made of silver. Whatever you do, do not use a silver cleaning paste or liquid! It will remove the black patina from the grooves. Use one of those silver polishing rags they sell on amazon, which are pre-treated with something that cleans silver.

 

6. All parker converters and cartridges work with this pen.

 

Have fun!

 

alex

 

Thanks!


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#10 SenZen

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Posted 22 September 2018 - 14:07

I think the OPs pen is not the Cisele, but dang I see this all the time on Ebay - all the black polished out, then they want $200 for the pen...

 

Yup, milleraies.


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#11 amk

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Posted 22 September 2018 - 14:26

The 75 is like the Parker 45. Really close to indestructible, and just needs cleaning, usually. If the ink has dried solid, it may need a soak.

 

Then flush it really, really well with water and a little ammonia. Then flush it all over again.

 

Then just water.

 

And then what I usually do with vintage pens is I fill with water and leave them for a bit. If they have little leaking cracks it's less expensive and less messy if they leak water all over, rather than a nice Iroshizuku Ink. (Go on, ask me how I know...)


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#12 SenZen

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Posted 22 September 2018 - 14:31

The 75 is like the Parker 45. Really close to indestructible, and just needs cleaning, usually. If the ink has dried solid, it may need a soak.

 

Then flush it really, really well with water and a little ammonia. Then flush it all over again.

 

Then just water.

 

And then what I usually do with vintage pens is I fill with water and leave them for a bit. If they have little leaking cracks it's less expensive and less messy if they leak water all over, rather than a nice Iroshizuku Ink. (Go on, ask me how I know...)

 

Ha ha! Good tip, thanks!


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#13 JayKay3000

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Posted 23 September 2018 - 17:17

I have fairly large hands and the first time I used a parker 75 I hated it. The funny shaped grip did not feel that nice, but as you can turn the nib I've found the optimal way to hold them.

 

They're fairly light pens and roughly sonnet size in length. I suppose elegant is a good term.

 

If you buy one at a good price you should be able to sell it for what you paid so even if you don't like it, sell it and move on.

 

Most of the designs are pretty nice. People really try and rinse people on cisel pens. I wouldn't pay more than $120 for a parker 75 in good condition. You can get good deals on designs people care less about and you will probably pay more for an early usa 60s model than a later model. Earlier models have the flat tassies and the later ones have the dished tassies. If you end up buying a cisel in the future it SHOULD have black lines in between the cuts as in the early versions they came like this from the factory. Later models they let patina take its course. (probably because it was cheaper to make them this way). I use a silver cloth on my silver plated pens as they do go dark over time and it brightens them up no end.

 

Fine nibs are OK as they're not too thin. Mediums can be fairly juicy and from the three I've got each nib has been pretty smooth. The medium is the smoothest, but obviously puts down more ink.

 

Most good, used parker 75s should come with their original converters. A metal style that's pretty good, but as said modern cartridges and converts work.

 

Have fun with you Parker 75. I use mine daily.

 

 

Obviously I'm an expert now :lol:, but I have done a lot of research and trawled through a lot of overpriced garbage to get the pens I have now. People seem to be always trading parker 75s and really good deals do come up. The last one i brought didn't have a writing sample so, kindly the seller sent me a writing sample as I wanted proof that it actually worked and it let me see how the ink looked on the paper.


Edited by JayKay3000, 23 September 2018 - 17:24.


#14 Boz

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Posted 23 September 2018 - 18:00

Where do you get the silver cloth in the UK, please?



#15 FarmBoy

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Posted 23 September 2018 - 18:42

Excessive force?

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#16 alexwi

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Posted 23 September 2018 - 20:30

Hmmm.... Even the cretins who do that to their ears (among other, equally, uhm, "creative" things) don't do it all at once, in a single pull. Those that would be tempted to do it in a fell swoop should definitely stay away from servicing their pens.

 

I must confess that when I wrote that bit of advice, the first thing that came to mind were nipples. I'm really glad I chose earlobes, or that would've been the end of this discussion ;-)

 

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#17 Old Salt

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Posted 24 September 2018 - 00:35

Stop in any jewelry store ask for a Jewlers cloth. It’s all you need.

#18 SenZen

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Posted 24 September 2018 - 00:55


 

 

Obviously I'm an expert now :lol:, but I have done a lot of research and trawled through a lot of overpriced garbage to get the pens I have now. People seem to be always trading parker 75s and really good deals do come up. The last one i brought didn't have a writing sample so, kindly the seller sent me a writing sample as I wanted proof that it actually worked and it let me see how the ink looked on the paper.

 

Thanks, good points. I got it for something like $60 plus shipping, hence the jump, but I won't know if it's a good deal until I try it and see if it works, if it's in good nick and if I can write with it; there's no market for fountain pens where I live so I might as well give it away, my sister has small hands.


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#19 Old Salt

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Posted 24 September 2018 - 02:18

Take your time with it. Buy yourself an bulb syringe down at your local drug store. Fill it with water and see if the water flows freely through the nib. Soak it in water until you get a good flow. If water doesnt get you good results then switch to an amonia based pen flush.
The 75 has a small space inside the section where old ink can accumulate. Once you get the nib and feed to move, and out of the pen, flush the section out well. I once had a mass of gooey old ink come out of one of these sections.
Do the same flushing process with the squeeze converter that comes with it.
P-75s are great writers. I hope you enjoy your pen.
Heres a photo of bulb syringes that I cut down to suit different pen sections. The most valuable pen maintenance tool I own.
Come back to us if you run into any problems.

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#20 Boz

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Posted 24 September 2018 - 09:08

Stop in any jewelry store ask for a Jewlers cloth. It’s all you need.

 

Thank you - I'll do that.







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