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Inky Question For Ef Nib Users


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128 replies to this topic

#121 85AKbN

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Posted 20 March 2020 - 08:59

These videos helped me on the nib differences.

 

 


Edited by 85AKbN, 20 March 2020 - 09:00.


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#122 85AKbN

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Posted 20 March 2020 - 09:00

one more

 



#123 Misfit

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Posted 20 March 2020 - 21:29

Question for those who use EF nibs more often. Have you seen some line variation with your EF nibs? It seems the Graf von Faber-Castell Grip 2010 pen I have with an EF nib does show some, especially in looping tail letters. The Caran d’Ache 849 does that too, but the GvFC seems more pleasant to write with.
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#124 A Smug Dill

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Posted 20 March 2020 - 23:37

Question for those who use EF nibs more often. Have you seen some line variation with your EF nibs?

 

 

Yes, of course. However, line width is an attribute measured on a continuous scale, so if the individual thinks of line variation as a boolean attribute (i.e. yes-or-no, there is or there isn't, with no middle ground), then he/she will be (consciously or unconsciously) applying threshold criteria based on absolute (e.g. >0.2mm between the narrowest and the widest parts of a pen stroke) or relative (e.g. >50%) difference. Then there's the matter of whether the line variation is controllable; the upending tails of minuscules 'g' and 'y' may be very narrow and sharp, but that doesn't mean the user of the pen can achieve the same thin hairlines in parts of other majuscules and minuscules when he/she so desires.


As always:  1. Implicit in everything and every instance I write on FPN is the invitation for you to judge me as a peer in the community. I think it's only due respect to take each other's written word in online discussion seriously and apply critical judgment.  2. I do not presume to judge for you what is right, correct or valid. If I make a claim, or refute a statement in a thread, and link to references and other information in support, I beseech you to review and consider those, and judge for yourself. I may be wrong. My position or say-so carries no more weight than anyone else's here, and external parties can speak for themselves with what they have published.  3. I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable. If it is something you can test for yourself and see the results, I entreat you to do so.

#125 Intensity

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Posted 20 March 2020 - 23:59

Very easily with some nibs and inks.  Seeing plenty of line variation with my new Pilot Vanishing Point EF nib.  Pressure is a factor.  Pressing more or less into paper will result in different line width.  This works best with moderate to dry inks.


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#126 SchaumburgSwan

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Posted 21 March 2020 - 03:00

Very easily with some nibs and inks.  Seeing plenty of line variation with my new Pilot Vanishing Point EF nib.  Pressure is a factor.  Pressing more or less into paper will result in different line width.  This works best with moderate to dry inks.

 

+1

 

This works surprisingly well when writing with some kind of "flex rhythm". More pressure on downstrokes, otherwise a light hand.

Just try it... I have some vintage Swan nibs in the xxf to xf range that give very nice results this way when writing upside down... Smooth paper and ig ink like ESSRI help, too.

 

Best

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#127 Misfit

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Posted 23 March 2020 - 00:09

Its fascinating because I dont think I see it as much with F, M and B nibs. Or am I not looking as A Smug Dill mentioned.

I agree that pressure plays a part as I've seen that with my own writing with the Faber-Castell EF. Thank you all for telling about your experiences.

Edited by Misfit, 23 March 2020 - 00:11.

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#128 A Smug Dill

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Posted 23 March 2020 - 02:19

I go out of my way, so to speak, to extort, cajole, or otherwise "achieve" line variation from a pen when it's desired (for effect, or show, or for any actual value however measured).

 

http://www.fountainp...-ink/?p=4205686

 

I personally do not accept (or "respect") any definition of "line variation" that explicitly or tacitly requires no conscious effort and change in writing technique (pressure, speed, etc.) on the part of the fountain pen user, and no "risk" in trying to skirt the fine line between elastic and inelastic deformation of the metal.

 

There are very few pens with "nail" nibs that will totally resist and therefore exhibit no line variation whatsoever no matter how hard I try.


Edited by A Smug Dill, 23 March 2020 - 02:19.

As always:  1. Implicit in everything and every instance I write on FPN is the invitation for you to judge me as a peer in the community. I think it's only due respect to take each other's written word in online discussion seriously and apply critical judgment.  2. I do not presume to judge for you what is right, correct or valid. If I make a claim, or refute a statement in a thread, and link to references and other information in support, I beseech you to review and consider those, and judge for yourself. I may be wrong. My position or say-so carries no more weight than anyone else's here, and external parties can speak for themselves with what they have published.  3. I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable. If it is something you can test for yourself and see the results, I entreat you to do so.

#129 Intensity

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Posted 23 March 2020 - 04:04

Its fascinating because I dont think I see it as much with F, M and B nibs. Or am I not looking as A Smug Dill mentioned.

I agree that pressure plays a part as I've seen that with my own writing with the Faber-Castell EF. Thank you all for telling about your experiences.

 

Some nibs are easier to get line variation from than others in this regard, and the right ink types help too.  For instance, very rounded, larger tipping nibs with a wet ink will mostly write like markers.  I'm thinking of the likes of Lamy Safari Medium and Bold.  A nib with a sharper cut that puts down precise lines is much easier to get line variation from, especially with more dry inks.  Also nibs that are a bit springy.  For instance my Kaweco Perkeo Fine with a #5 Bock nib is really good at line variation with almost no effort.  Finish with a light hand for very fine hairlines, push down slightly for bold lines.  Try more dry inks too, like GvFC, Pelikan, even some Diamine.


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