Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies






Photo

I'm Curious About New Types Of Calligraphy And Would It Be Worth Trying? It Is Very Difficult?

calligraphy fountain pen palmer spencerian copperplate

  • Please log in to reply
51 replies to this topic

#1 Edo98

Edo98

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 78 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 17 August 2018 - 05:27

First of all greetings to all I am new at The fountain pen network and in the magnificent world of fountain pens at the moment I only have one lamy logo and within a month I will get a 2000 lamy.

I am a young man of 20 years old who since childhood my mother taught me the art of writing. I use the palmer method to write and I love it and more when I use stub nibs because of the effect of line variation.
And I've had some curiosity about trying out new calligraphy styles like Spencerian or Copperplate and I really do not know which one to start with first and which one is going to make it easier with Palmer's bases.
and with respect to the tools that are used I have never used flexible nibs I have only used round and stub, I do not really know how hard a flex is.
So what do you recommend? Is it worth trying or should I continue with palmer?
I also leave some samples of my handwriting
Attached File  Documentos escaneados.pdf   417.33KB   54 downloads


Sponsored Content

#2 Chrissy

Chrissy

    Ancient Artifact

  • Away
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,301 posts

Posted 17 August 2018 - 06:14

Hello and welcome to FPN.  :W2FPN:​ 

 

I recommend you check out the individual forums for handwriting under the Creative Expressions forum heading.



#3 jar

jar

    A Vintage Pen has to be older than me.

  • Premium - Ruby

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,805 posts
  • Location:From Deep South Texas
  • Flag:

Posted 17 August 2018 - 11:36

Welcome home.  Pull up a stump and set a spell.  I use the Oriental Calligraphy System; my handwriting is inscrutable.


My Sister's website :  Rose Hill Studios

My Website


#4 Henricum_Tropen

Henricum_Tropen

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,782 posts
  • Location:Cape Town, South Africa
  • Flag:

Posted 17 August 2018 - 12:37

Hello and welcome to FPN, from Cape Town, South Africa. 


To sit at one's table on a sunny morning, with four clear hours of uninterruptible security, plenty of nice white paper, and a [fountain] pen - that is true happiness!

- Winston Churchill

 

 


#5 tbickiii

tbickiii

    tbickiii

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,080 posts
  • Location:Baton Rouge, LA
  • Flag:

Posted 17 August 2018 - 13:41

Hello and welcome from Baton Rouge, Louisiana...Enjoy your time here


Thomas
Baton Rouge, LA
(tbickiii)

Check out my ebay pen listings
:
  tbickiii's Vintage Fountain Pens


#6 TeeTee

TeeTee

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 60 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 17 August 2018 - 15:09

Hello from HK.

For calligraphy, I personally like flex nib, yet for daily use, I prefer stub, as flex nib skips or rails more easily when writing fast.

#7 Wahl

Wahl

    Museum Piece

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,937 posts
  • Location:Spain
  • Flag:

Posted 17 August 2018 - 16:26

:W2FPN:



#8 Corona688

Corona688

    Inkfingered Crackpot

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 766 posts
  • Location:Prairies
  • Flag:

Posted 17 August 2018 - 17:23

If you want to get into flex nibs without breaking something expensive or getting stuck with a pen you dislike, dip pens are an inexpensive way to explore. Just keep in mind that "spencerian" nibs are ultra-sharp and fragile, art nibs are more forgiving to start with.

#9 Corona688

Corona688

    Inkfingered Crackpot

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 766 posts
  • Location:Prairies
  • Flag:

Posted 17 August 2018 - 17:25

Also see this thread for a great big old-fashioned book on the subject of penmanship.

#10 PAKMAN

PAKMAN

    Say that again, I have a pen here somewhere...

  • FPN Super Moderators

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,959 posts
  • Location:Arkansas, USA
  • Flag:

Posted 17 August 2018 - 17:41

Hello and Welcome to FPN!! Glad to have you as a member!!


PAKMAN
 

minibanner.gif             fpn_1321906507__vanness_sign.jpg 

                  My Favorite Pen Restorer                            My favorite Brick and Mortar              

                                                                   now selling online!


#11 Edo98

Edo98

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 78 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 17 August 2018 - 18:41

Thank you very much everyone for your warm welcome to FPN :) , for the information that you provided me with those types of calligraphy are for slow writing due to flex nib so I think I would use it as a hobby or for letter titles or essays.

I am currently studying at the university and then I take quick notes and for that my Palmer variant has been useful for me.
 
I say variant because I recently read some old books about muscle writing and writing with my arm instead of my fingers and in school they never taught me that principle of Palmer handwriting. :huh:
 
Maybe next summer, since I go back to school on Monday and they say the semester will be harder, I hope I have the opportunity to practice and improve my current handwriting and try new styles.


#12 Edo98

Edo98

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 78 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 17 August 2018 - 18:48

If you want to get into flex nibs without breaking something expensive or getting stuck with a pen you dislike, dip pens are an inexpensive way to explore. Just keep in mind that "spencerian" nibs are ultra-sharp and fragile, art nibs are more forgiving to start with.

Thank you for sharing your experience, if I get to encourage you to practice one of those styles I will try a dip pen since I have no experience using flex nibs and the idea of breaking an expensive nib flex  :(  :crybaby:



#13 OCArt

OCArt

    OBB

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,193 posts
  • Location:San Diego
  • Flag:

Posted 17 August 2018 - 19:50

Welcome to our little corner of the universe from a pen user in San Diego. 



#14 Corona688

Corona688

    Inkfingered Crackpot

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 766 posts
  • Location:Prairies
  • Flag:

Posted 17 August 2018 - 22:50

those types of calligraphy are for slow writing due to flex nib so I think I would use it as a hobby or for letter titles or essays.


If you're more interested in italic that's fair, but flex pens aren't slow. Cursive handwriting was invented as a rapid way to write with flex pens!

fpn_1436409649__july_8_01.jpg
(Image by AAAndrew)

If you follow the pen in your mind, you'll notice that every thick line is a downstroke, when a flex pen would accent naturally.

#15 Edo98

Edo98

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 78 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 17 August 2018 - 23:37

If you're more interested in italic that's fair, but flex pens aren't slow. Cursive handwriting was invented as a rapid way to write with flex pens!

fpn_1436409649__july_8_01.jpg
(Image by AAAndrew)

If you follow the pen in your mind, you'll notice that every thick line is a downstroke, when a flex pen would accent naturally.

 

I did not know that I thought it was a slower type of writing and more thinking.
I think the complicated part at the beginning would be to have a good synchronization in the handwriting lines, accents normal pressure and descending with some pressure and I imagine that with a good time practicing could be fast as you say. I feel that if I write slowly at the beginning XD I'm used to not using pressure in my handwriting I usually use a medium speed to fast depending on the situation with smooth fountain pens nibs, I think it would be a matter of getting used to the flex.
 
And that dip pens you recommend me (brands or types) to start experimenting, Previously you mentioned some that are scratchy and fragile

 

And above all, thanks for your feedback here at FPN, they are all very attentive and friendly people


#16 Edo98

Edo98

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 78 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 18 August 2018 - 00:06

If you want to get into flex nibs without breaking something expensive or getting stuck with a pen you dislike, dip pens are an inexpensive way to explore. Just keep in mind that "spencerian" nibs are ultra-sharp and fragile, art nibs are more forgiving to start with.

 

Excuse my ignorance but what are the art nibs?



#17 Corona688

Corona688

    Inkfingered Crackpot

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 766 posts
  • Location:Prairies
  • Flag:

Posted 18 August 2018 - 01:51

I think the complicated part at the beginning would be to have a good synchronization in the handwriting lines, accents normal pressure and descending with some pressure

It's the same skill as using a pencil without breaking it (too hard down) or tearing paper(too hard up) while still leaving marks on the page. It was harder for me to re-learn cursive.
 

And that dip pens you recommend me (brands or types) to start experimenting, Previously you mentioned some that are scratchy and fragile


I'm no expert, but these are favorite nibs, from soft to slightly less soft:

-Brause Rose. Extremely flexible with next to no pressure. Just a bit scratchy.
-Hunt #99. Very flexible and needs next to no pressure, but rather scratchy and fragile.
-Hiro #41. Moderate amount of flex with a little pressure. Very durable, very smooth-writing, very easy to use! My favorite. Runs out of ink fast though.
 

Excuse my ignorance but what are the art nibs?

Dip pen nibs for crosshatching, cartooning, or lettering instead of calligraphy. They're usually smoother-writing than calligraphy nibs. The Hunt #99 is a flexible drawing nib, the #512 is a rigid drawing nib. The Hiro #41 is called a calligraphy nib, but it's a very unusual calligraphy nib - blunter, less flexible and very smooth writing.

The Hunt #103 is a calligraphy nib so fine it requires special paper.

Edited by Corona688, 18 August 2018 - 02:16.


#18 northstar

northstar

    Donor Pen

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,807 posts
  • Location:Iraq
  • Flag:

Posted 18 August 2018 - 05:42

Hello and welcome to FPN.


<p style="text-align:center;">《Recite, and your Lord is the most Generous ⊙ Who taught by the pen ⊙</p><p style="text-align:center;">Taught man that which he knew not》 (96/3-5)<div style="text-align: center"><img src="http://s5.postimg.or...so3/letter.png" alt="Snail Mail" class="center"></div>

#19 mitto

mitto

    Ancient Artifact

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,801 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 18 August 2018 - 18:29

Greetings and welcome to FPN.
Khan

#20 amberleadavis

amberleadavis

    Inky! En-Abe-Lawyer

  • FPN Super Moderators

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 35,716 posts
  • Location:North Las Vegas
  • Flag:

Posted 30 August 2018 - 02:04

As soon as the ink is dry, I have letters to post, but in the meantime, Corona688 - you are an enabler - I totally respect that!  Now, where do I find this Hiro #41 and does it have to be a dip nib? Can I add it to a fountain pen?


Fountain pens are my preferred COLOR DELIVERY SYSTEM (in part because crayons melt in Las Vegas).

 

Want to get a special letter / gift from me, then create a Ghostly Avatar  

 

Participate in the newest Inky TODs: 

Why do I like those nibs? 

What do I like about my handwriting? 

Whose handwriting do I like?  

Which Script Will I learn? 

Which Inks for my Handwriting

 

Ink comparisons:  The Great PPS Comparison  366 Inks in 2016

 

Check out inks sorted by color:  Blue Purple Brown  Red Green Orange Black  Pinks  Yellows  Blue-Blacks Grey/Gray UVInks Turquoise/Teal






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: calligraphy, fountain pen, palmer, spencerian, copperplate



Sponsored Content




|