Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies






Photo

Inks - Wet To Dry


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 corgicoupe

corgicoupe

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,364 posts
  • Location:East of Atlanta
  • Flag:

Posted 11 July 2018 - 18:52

I often see a recommendation to use a wetter ink, or a drier ink. I make a mental note of the suggestions but forget them a week later. Has anyone put together a list of the more common inks on a scale of wetness to dryness, limited to the more common blue, blue/black, or black inks from major brands?


Baptiste knew how to make a short job long

For love of it. And yet not waste time either.

                                                         Robert Frost


Sponsored Content

#2 Runnin_Ute

Runnin_Ute

    Super Pinks member:

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,296 posts
  • Location:Sandy, Utah - Elevation 4509'
  • Flag:

Posted 12 July 2018 - 00:20

There is a TOD on wet inks and one on dry inks. It's a starting point....

Edited by Runnin_Ute, 12 July 2018 - 00:20.

Brad
 
"Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind" - Rudyard Kipling
"None of us can have as many virtues as the fountain-pen, or half its cussedness; but we can try." - Mark Twain
 


#3 corgicoupe

corgicoupe

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,364 posts
  • Location:East of Atlanta
  • Flag:

Posted 12 July 2018 - 13:16

So far, then, Pelikan 4001 is Dry and Waterman is Wet.

 

I suppose one has to include color as a variable in addition to brand, which is why I limited my question to three common colors. I'm thinking that Parker and Sheaffer fit between these two.


Edited by corgicoupe, 12 July 2018 - 13:20.

Baptiste knew how to make a short job long

For love of it. And yet not waste time either.

                                                         Robert Frost


#4 flyingpenman

flyingpenman

    We see in a mirror dimly...

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 578 posts
  • Location:North Carolina
  • Flag:

Posted 14 July 2018 - 11:15

Noodlers and Iroshizuku are generally considered wet or saturated standard by many users here, with Pelikan 4001 being the "dry" benchmark as you've mentioned along with some iron gall inks like R&K Salix or ESSRI. I've found that Diamine (though definitely varying from ink to ink), generally makes inks that are a good middle of the road option.

There should be some other posts on here, and Goulet pens has a blog post and Q&A about wet and dry inks that might help:

https://blog.gouletp...et-and-dry-inks
https://blog.gouletp...et-and-dry-inks
Whenever you are fed up with life, start writing: ink is the great cure for all human ills, as I found out long ago.
~C.S. Lewis

#5 aurore

aurore

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 147 posts

Posted 14 July 2018 - 13:18

Any generalization regarding brand XY = wet or dry would be rather inaccurate except probably Pelikan 4001 line being dry.

Iroshizuku are in general free flowing but not all of them are literally wet.
Some Sailor inks are very wet (for exemple Doyou and Miruai, but not wattery - in a very specific Sailor's way), some are neither wet nor dry (Okuyama), Diamine covers the whole scale from rather dry (Prussian Blue) to very wet (Asa Blue), but as flyingpenman said they are usually in the middle.

Therefore expecting from Pelikan 4001 anything but being bone dry would be a fault, other than that all is a matter of trying out a particular ink and morevover a pen/ink combo imo



#6 inkstainedruth

inkstainedruth

    Ancient Artifact

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,704 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 14 July 2018 - 15:06

What aurore said.  Diamine Registrar's Blue-black used to be the absolute end of the scale for "dry" -- but Robert Oster Black Violet is possibly worse.  Most De Atramentis inks are pretty wet but their Document line inks aren't.  Ditto for Noodler's being all over the map (just like their other behaviors are all over the map -- I tried Walnut early on in what turned out to be a dry pen; in a very wet 1990s era Pelikan M400, though?  It was perfect (whereas Iroshizuku Yami-guri, one of my favorite brown inks, was way too wet an ink to use in that pen).  

You can't even say "x type of ink is dry/wet" -- while Diamine Registrar's is indeed a dry ink, other iron gall inks like the KWZI ones are not dry in my experience, and have a decent flow.

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

 

ETA: The only way to probably accurately test is to have one pen that you know is a dry writer, and one pen which is a very wet one, and test every single ink out there....  And that is a project that would take years... maybe even decades....  And new companies show up in the industry all the time, like Birmingham and Colorverese; even stuff like Robert Oster has only been around a couple of years for general/international release.


Edited by inkstainedruth, 14 July 2018 - 15:14.

"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

#7 ENewton

ENewton

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,433 posts

Posted 14 July 2018 - 16:25

I have nothing to add about blues, blacks, or blue-blacks but would go even farther than others to avoid characterizing an entirely brand or line as wet or dry.

 

I have used Pelikan 4001 Violet for decades and have never found it to be dry, so perhaps it is best not to generalize, even for that line.  

 

The Oster inks I have tried have ranged from somewhat dry to extremely dry--I am not surprised to hear about Black Violet, given my experience with other Oster purples--but I understand that some Oster inks flow more generously. 

 

My one Diamine ink is dry but I understand others are not as dry.

 

KWZI IG Violet #3 is among the wetter inks I have used, just gorgeous but definitely best on non-absorbent paper.



#8 corgicoupe

corgicoupe

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,364 posts
  • Location:East of Atlanta
  • Flag:

Posted 15 July 2018 - 16:21

"ETA: The only way to probably accurately test is to have one pen that you know is a dry writer, and one pen which is a very wet one, and test every single ink out there....  And that is a project that would take years... maybe even decades....  "

 

Not to mention $$$.


Edited by corgicoupe, 15 July 2018 - 16:22.

Baptiste knew how to make a short job long

For love of it. And yet not waste time either.

                                                         Robert Frost


#9 monquito

monquito

    NOS (New Old Stock)

  • Member - Silver

  • PipPip
  • 16 posts
  • Location:Pioneer Valley, Massachusetts

Posted 16 July 2018 - 00:11

I have used Pelikan 4001 Violet for decades and have never found it to be dry, so perhaps it is best not to generalize, even for that line.  

I was about to add much the same thing! I just swabbed up all my purple samples the other day and was surprised at how nice and smooth 4001 Violet felt given the reputation. The generalization had me avoiding an ink I could happily use in any pen.



#10 ENewton

ENewton

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,433 posts

Posted 16 July 2018 - 13:12

I was about to add much the same thing! I just swabbed up all my purple samples the other day and was surprised at how nice and smooth 4001 Violet felt given the reputation. The generalization had me avoiding an ink I could happily use in any pen.

 

Yes, I regularly use it in a Japanese extra fine, because it is vivid enough for me to read the line clearly and smooth enough to provide a pleasant writing experience.

  

Recently, I tried it in a new cursive italic pen, and it gave me the impression that the pen must be very wet, so I tried an Oster ink, figuring that the wetness of the pen would compensate for the dryness of the ink, but no, the pen was actually not wet, at least not wet enough to use with a drier ink. 

 

I keep thinking I am tired of Violet after so many years, but then I use it and think, would I ever really want to be without this ink?



#11 inkstainedruth

inkstainedruth

    Ancient Artifact

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,704 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 16 July 2018 - 15:31

"ETA: The only way to probably accurately test is to have one pen that you know is a dry writer, and one pen which is a very wet one, and test every single ink out there....  And that is a project that would take years... maybe even decades....  "

 

Not to mention $$$.

 

Well, getting samples whenever possible would help with the cost.  But yeah, that too....  I can think of several times when I tried an ink based on a review, only to discover that the ink in person did not look like what I was seeing in a photo or scan.

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth


"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

#12 corgicoupe

corgicoupe

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,364 posts
  • Location:East of Atlanta
  • Flag:

Posted 16 July 2018 - 22:17

And I do recall that Ron Zorn considers Pelikan 4001 his standard ink.


Baptiste knew how to make a short job long

For love of it. And yet not waste time either.

                                                         Robert Frost







Sponsored Content




|