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Inexpensive, Fat-Sectioned Pen?

section grip inexpensive

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51 replies to this topic

#1 tvradio

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Posted 08 July 2018 - 15:02

I'm looking for a reliable daily writer, an inexpensive - let's say under $50 - fountain pen with a section that's 10.5mm-12.4mm in width.

 

As I continue to learn more about fountain pens I find that I like thicker sections. My favorite nib still has to be on my Metropolitan M, but the 8.4mm section (acccording to the GouletPens site) is so narrow it's painful for me two write more than a half page with it, so had to I clean it out & put it away. 

 

My main writers are a bunch of F and M Preppy and Plaisirs, and a M Kakuno. Their 10mm sections' widths are just about the minimum I can write with for long periods, but I'd love something a bit thicker. (I'mfine with light pens though, and I prefer to write unposted.) My favorite-feeling pen I've used is the Jinhao 159, which GouletPens notes has a 12.4mm section. But I've had terrible, repeated issues with all my Jinhaos drying out and hard-starting (using various inks), as well as occasional feed problems with two different replacement Jowo B nibs. If I could get a Jinhao 159 that didn't dry out I'd be in heaven, but the pen's design (and the cheap plastic feeds, which sometimes reseat the nibs after continued use) are design issues that I don't think can be avoided.

 

From my research one possible pen option I came across that's close to my needs might be Monteverde's Giant Sequoia, which is a bit outside my budget, and bigger/heavier than I'm used to. Azizah's review says the section is 10.8mm which might could work well for me.

 

Are there any decent thicker-grip pens I should consider in my price range?

 

 


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#2 woleizihan

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Posted 08 July 2018 - 15:20

Indian eyedroppers?

#3 flipper_gv

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Posted 08 July 2018 - 15:20

Ranga, moonman, Jinhao 159, many many options from Asia.



#4 Karmachanic

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Posted 08 July 2018 - 15:30

The ASA Maya is the only Indian pen I have experience with. It might work for you. I have the 3 in 1 option.

 

I tend to hold all pens at the top of the section or higher. I find that this helps greatly with narrower sections.

 

You can see the Maya in this current thread http://www.fountainp...cent-group-buy/. And of a different ASA pen here http://www.fountainp...india-pictures/

 

An added benfit of the Maya is that it is made from ebonite, which has a very pleasant organic feel.

 

I plan on ordering a custom pen from Mr Subramaniam at ASA in six weeks or so.


Edited by Karmachanic, 08 July 2018 - 15:47.

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#5 TSherbs

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Posted 08 July 2018 - 16:18

Noodler's Ahab

 

very comfortable in my big hands

 

Goulet lists the section at 9.9mm, but this is only at the narrowest location closest to the nib. I hold the pen further toward the threads, where the diameter is 10.7mm. It's a chunky, light pen. Might need some fiddling to get it to write how you like, however. These pens are a bit of DIY (which I like).



#6 tvradio

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Posted 08 July 2018 - 16:31

The ASA Maya is the only Indian pen I have experience with. It might work for you. I have the 3 in 1 option.

Interesting. Something like that might be a good way to go. I just noticed that there's a Ranga group buy going on and one commenter said his pen is "~10.5mm at its thinnest, flaring out to ~11.5mm near the nib and 12mm just before the cap threads."

 

Cheapest CC version is $64 (I'm not a fan of eyedroppering because I like to swap inks a lot), so that's within sight of my budget, at least.


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#7 Herrjaeger

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Posted 08 July 2018 - 16:35

Regarding your Jinhao 159: many have commented on both it’s drying out tendency as well as it being a wet writer. Several threads about this have indicated the convertor (as well as the nib unit) should be flushed several times. One poster who strongly advocates Jinhao pens used a drop of dish detergent with a drop of ammonia in his flushing solution for Jinhaos, and recommends at least five flushes of this. I did this when I got my 159, and it has been a great writer from the start, with a very smooth nib, and no flow problems/ drying out issues so far. You could also try using a wetter ink in it.

#8 flyingpenman

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Posted 08 July 2018 - 17:50

+1 to Herrjager's recommendation about flushing.

If the 159 doesn't work out I had no drying out issues with my X750, though I used a fine nib, not sure how a broad would pan out. But they're a cheap option to try.
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#9 tvradio

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Posted 09 July 2018 - 00:03

Regarding your Jinhao 159: many have commented on both it’s drying out tendency as well as it being a wet writer. Several threads about this have indicated the convertor (as well as the nib unit) should be flushed several times. One poster who strongly advocates Jinhao pens used a drop of dish detergent with a drop of ammonia in his flushing solution for Jinhaos, and recommends at least five flushes of this. I did this when I got my 159, and it has been a great writer from the start, with a very smooth nib, and no flow problems/ drying out issues so far. You could also try using a wetter ink in it.

Thanks. I have flushed several times, with my homemade flush made from dish detergent and clear ammonia (from an old video by SBRE Brown). I've never done 5 flushes in a row but I've definitely done 2 in a row, with multi-hour soaks. Perhaps this will be an experiment to try.... 

 

I thought I'd hate the thickness of the 159, and bought it just to play with, and partly as a goof. I was simply amazed at how comfortable, even pleasurable, it was to write with. 

 

Got to say though that the Platinum Preppys and Plaisirs I have are insane bang-for-the-buck pens. Their Slip & Seal caps pretty much guarantee the pens work the second they're uncapped, and they're my go-to when using bulletproof inks, as any staining or bad clogs (which I haven't experienced yet) could easily be fixed by throwing them away, lol. If only there was such a thing as a fat-bodied Preppy or Kakuno....


“We could be heroes/Just for one day” ― David Bowie


#10 Precise

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Posted 09 July 2018 - 00:31

I'm not sure what you mean by inexpensive, but the owner of Bexley, Howard Levy sells his pens for under $90 on ebay (under the name bexlevy).  The Prometheus model has a wonderful fat section and is my favorite pen.

Alan

Here's one

https://www.ebay.com...msAAOSwHoFXuGcD



#11 MG66

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Posted 09 July 2018 - 00:33

My preference in pens is the same - the 159 feels great to me and not too big at all. I've never had the slightest issue with any Jinhao pen, which apparently makes me weird or maybe blessed. Probably the former as I DO have problems with many other pens that others say are way better and more reliable than Jinhao. So there you go.

If you can find a Bexley Prometheus used you might be in your price range and you'll have a fantastic pen.

Best value IME is the 159. Best big boy pen is my Franklin Christoph 19. The Prometheus is my best non-Jinhao for value.

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#12 OCArt

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Posted 09 July 2018 - 03:25

The least expensive and biggest fountain pen is the Hero Wing Sung 590. Reviewed by SBRE Brown here:


“The proper definition of a man is an animal that writes letters.”

Lewis Carroll

 


#13 sail1942

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Posted 09 July 2018 - 03:36

Check out the TWSBI Diamond 580

#14 BEEG

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Posted 09 July 2018 - 18:43

Faber-Castell Loom? It is addicted to pies, but really comfortable, at least for me(but I like heavy pens), with a great NIB. On the same level as the Diplomat and Carene nibs. 



#15 Honeybadgers

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Posted 10 July 2018 - 01:45

indian ebonite or acrylic is the way to go. If you can spring for a little more ($75) the conklin all american (without the omniflex nib) is a fabulously well made pen and nice and beefy without being too heavy.


Selling a boatload of restored, fairly rare, vintage Japanese gold nib pens, click here to see (more added as I finish restoring them)


#16 southpaw

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Posted 10 July 2018 - 03:18

I like thicker sections too. The Ranga 8b, while a bit over your limit, is a great choice.
"But God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us." (Rom. 5:8, NKJV)

#17 Mech-for-i

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Posted 10 July 2018 - 10:00

Moonman M5 ... that's what I would recommend , not exactly a large pen, but with a barrel girth just a bit over 12mm and having an only so slightly pinched section ( thinnest part still 11mm ), wooden barrel a bonus.

 

27578033667_00d04997cf_o.jpgMoonmam M5 Ebony, on Flickr


Edited by Mech-for-i, 10 July 2018 - 14:13.


#18 goodpens

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Posted 10 July 2018 - 12:57

TWSBI Eco is an option. It is in your price range, starts well, does not dry out easily, smooth nib. Goulet lists the body diameter as 12.8mm.

https://www.gouletpe...ASABEgIao_D_BwE

#19 tvradio

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Posted 10 July 2018 - 18:10

TWSBI Eco is an option. It is in your price range, starts well, does not dry out easily, smooth nib. Goulet lists the body diameter as 12.8mm.

https://www.gouletpe...ASABEgIao_D_BwE

Thanks, but if you look more closely you'll see that's the diameter of the body, not the section (which is measured at 9.1mm) - and it's the section that I was looking at and measuring.


Edited by tvradio, 10 July 2018 - 18:12.

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#20 Honeybadgers

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Posted 11 July 2018 - 02:09

Ooh that new moonman is a looker.


Selling a boatload of restored, fairly rare, vintage Japanese gold nib pens, click here to see (more added as I finish restoring them)






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