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Lamy 2000 Ef - Nib Grind To Oblique / Stub

lamy2000 stub oblique

10 replies to this topic

#1 TheLostOne

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 08:54

I am considering getting Lamy 2000 EF from "nibsmith" and getting it ground to left foot oblique in stub.

Any idea what kind of line width and variation it would result in?

My intention is to achieve a fine stub, similar to the 'Fine' stub of Pilot Plumix / Pluminix pen, which is quite fine, probably 0.5mm. It is fine enough for normal daily use and faster writing but still gives a character to the writing.



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#2 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 09:40

IMO, OEF is too thin to show much of anything. Especially in a nail, if that is what the 2000 is.

 

An OF being wider would show more pattern.....don't expect more than a tiny hint even at OF, at max with a nail....or even regular flex.

 

IMO an oblique that is not vintage '50-70 German semi-flex is worthless as is.

 

Those nibs are @ 1/2 a width narrower than modern.

I had thought I had ordered a Geha 790 OEF (rare all OEF from then is rare), but someone long ago had changed the nib to EF (barrel marked...not nib).....but it was a Maxi, so I was happy with that.

Pondering that maxi-semi-flex EF width and my maxi-semi-flex Pelikan 400NN OF.....decided not to 'waste' money chasing an OEF. The pattern would not have been wide enough to be of use to my eyes.

In a tiny script, any pattern  if any will be next to lost.

 

Modern Oblique has so little pattern compared to the real thing, German vintage  semi-flex oblique, it's not even funny. I had a nail 18K Lamy Persona OB....no line variation. A Lamy 27 nail OM, no line variation.

 

I've tried modern obliques from the regular flex 200's  when trans-mailing and have a '85-90 W.Germany 200 OM, with the tad more springy nib than the '90-97 ones. No cigar.

I have just gotten a regular flex....1005 and pre'97 600 both with OBB nibs. There is some line variation, but little compared to my '50-70 OBB or OB semi-flex nibs.

If there is only little to some at OBB, I can't see OEF having any readable line variation.

 

But again I am more than spoiled with semi-flex obliques.

 

It's hard enough from my reading to find the sweet spot on a 2000 as is....and then to have to hunt to find the proper angle of the oblique will be a pain....I'd bet.

 

A Geha 790 is the Best Buy in semi-flex on German Ebay. If you don't hit the "Buy Now Idiot" button, can be had for under E60....seen one go in the past auctions for the old price of E40.

Look for an OF......as I said, OEF is/was rare.

 

These are semi-flex and can be had in Obliques. (Could be you could find a OEF....but would be rare....the OF is a nice width....1/2 a width narrower than modern.....would be near Japanese F...perhaps the fatter Sailor width.) A Pelikan 140 can be had for E90-100, a '50's 400/400nn for E100-120........if you Hunt. There are the 'Buy Now Idiot' button for near twice as much.

 

In you are after a pattern.....semi-flex is best.

I feel OEF to be too narrow to leave much of a pattern especially in a semi-nail or regular flex of the 2000....though I've heard others say it's a nail nib.

I first saw a 2000 in '67...didn't like it then.

Any time I went hunting for someones grandfather's 2000 on German Ebay.....never found any. :(

So never got one.

So it is a well liked pen by the inheritors.


Everyone says poor Mozart dead at only 36. None say poor Mendelson, dead at only 38. His family only allowed him to start at 20, but before, musicians use to come to the Mendelson garden to steal the music of Mendelson and his sister. A good artist also, can still buy prints of his famous Scottish drawings in Scotland.

 

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany      Info on Bock nibs

 

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#3 TheLostOne

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 13:08

I'm not looking for significant line variation. Just something like a 0.5mm stub.



#4 AL01

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 14:05

 I'd say stick with an OF.

 

 BUT, if you want to take a little risk, then go with an OEF.

 

 If you end up with an OEF, you really have a one of a kind pen.

 

 I have never heard of an OEF before...


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#5 Ron Z

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 14:09

With a line width that fine it is very difficult if not impossible to get any line variation without also ending up with a very toothy nib, and line variation is the whole point of an oblique, or stub, or italic nib.  When grinding a nib you always end up with something that is finder than the width which you started. 


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#6 TheLostOne

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Posted 22 June 2018 - 09:44

... When grinding a nib you always end up with something that is finder than the width which you started. 

 

Oh. I thought it'd get slightly thicker since they'd be flattening the round tip a little. And considering Lamy 2000s run a little broader than normal sizes, OEF of Lamy 2000 would give a 0.5-0.6 mm type stub.



#7 bigt

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Posted 22 June 2018 - 12:50

I would suggest that it would be worthwhile to discuss your requirements with the nib
expert you have chosen to do your modification- they would probably be best to advise you
as to the best nib donor size to achieve your goal.
Tony

#8 Randal6393

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Posted 22 June 2018 - 15:17

To get a fine italic with any variation would result in a toothy nib -- more of a cursive italic than a stub. But I have a Pilot Prera that started out as a <CM> nib -- very similar to a Pilot Plumix nib. Also have a Lamy 2000 that started out as a Broad and was converted to an Italic Fine -- about a 1.1 mm stroke. Found the main difference between a Lamy and a Pilot is the rate of ink flow. Never could get the ink flow in the Lamy slow enough to write a good italic line. Well, I finally did by using an iron-gall ink (R & K Salix). So it can be done. But with that EF? Definitely confer with a good (maybe great) nibmeister on that one.

 

Enjoy,


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#9 Karmachanic

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Posted 22 June 2018 - 16:37

With a line width that fine it is very difficult if not impossible to get any line variation without also ending up with a very toothy nib, and line variation is the whole point of an oblique, or stub, or italic nib.  When grinding a nib you always end up with something that is finder than the width which you started. 

 

End of story.


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#10 pajaro

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Posted 22 June 2018 - 16:42

I have two Lamy 2000 extra fines, one wet and one dry.  I cannot imagine getting any visible line variation from these unless you have super eyesight.  REALLY super eyesight.  I have a Parker Sonnet fine italic, with "S" on the feed, and it looks to me like an extra fine round nib.  Of course I have macular degeneration and use a magnifying glass a lot. 

 

I have long considered having a BB nib reground to cursive italic.  The best to be hoped for is a broad italic, and it could result in a medium italic.  You do lose at least a nib size in these grinds.  EF to a ??  I would invest in a microscope with a big screen viewer.  On the fine italic of the Sonnet, it does take magnification to see any line variation.  Then again, I do have macular degeneration.  Fortunately an eye doctor stopped it.


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#11 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 22 June 2018 - 18:40

As said """REALLY super eyesight. """ And are more than proud that you can write tiny....or is that only write tiny? :P

 

It's with an Euro F, that one gets shading ...again unless you have REALLY super eyesight. 

 

You are condemned to write with vivid monotone supersaturated boring ink, only.


Everyone says poor Mozart dead at only 36. None say poor Mendelson, dead at only 38. His family only allowed him to start at 20, but before, musicians use to come to the Mendelson garden to steal the music of Mendelson and his sister. A good artist also, can still buy prints of his famous Scottish drawings in Scotland.

 

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany      Info on Bock nibs

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

Pens/inks/paper on hold for a year....new addiction pocket watch chains. :happyberet:




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