Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies






Photo

Celluloid-Safe Inks

ph celluloid akkermann iroshizuko

  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 H. Lime

H. Lime

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 118 posts
  • Location:The Netherlands

Posted 19 June 2018 - 20:22

This must've been covered elsewhere (but I couldn't find it) --

 

I've been using Akkermann ink (mainly Shocking Blue and, recently, Karmozijn) with my Omas celluloid pens -- and, for  the most part, had no pen/ink-interaction issues (I hope). Lately, I've also added Iroshizuko kon-peki to my small ink collection.

 

Anyways, today I've looked at the colorverse 'crystal planet' review, and the mentioning of that ink's ph (together with some grim pictures from RichardB's website) made me wonder -- has anyone experienced any problems using these inks (akkerman/iroshizuko/colorverse) with celluloid nitrate pens?


A fool and his money are soon parted: Montegrappa 300, Waterman Expert II, Omas Ogiva Autunno, Omas 555/S, Omas 557/S, Omas Ogiva Scarlet, Waterman Patrician Agate, Montblanc 144 (lost :(), Omas Ogiva Arco Brown (flex), Omas 360 Arco Brown, Delta Sevivon (stub), Montblanc 146 (1950s), Omas 360 Grey (stub), Omas 360 Wild (stub), Swan M2


Sponsored Content

#2 empliau

empliau

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 231 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 20 June 2018 - 00:47

I got in touch with Iroshizuku about the same issue - I won't let my green Arco be eaten even by the most beautiful ink.  Their pHs seem definitely alkaline.  I love my Iroshizukus, but I use Aurora and Visconti in my celluloid pen.

 

Attached File  Iroshizuku Ink.pdf   73.83KB   76 downloads



#3 H. Lime

H. Lime

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 118 posts
  • Location:The Netherlands

Posted 20 June 2018 - 04:17

Thanks. Oh well, that puts an end to any designs I had on 'crystal planet'. Back to 'shocking blue'.


Edited by H. Lime, 20 June 2018 - 05:12.

A fool and his money are soon parted: Montegrappa 300, Waterman Expert II, Omas Ogiva Autunno, Omas 555/S, Omas 557/S, Omas Ogiva Scarlet, Waterman Patrician Agate, Montblanc 144 (lost :(), Omas Ogiva Arco Brown (flex), Omas 360 Arco Brown, Delta Sevivon (stub), Montblanc 146 (1950s), Omas 360 Grey (stub), Omas 360 Wild (stub), Swan M2


#4 H. Lime

H. Lime

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 118 posts
  • Location:The Netherlands

Posted 22 June 2018 - 12:20

Update:

I've contacted Pilot and asked them about it -- according to someone from Pilot Benelux, the Iroshizuko Kon-Peki can be safely used with the 360.


A fool and his money are soon parted: Montegrappa 300, Waterman Expert II, Omas Ogiva Autunno, Omas 555/S, Omas 557/S, Omas Ogiva Scarlet, Waterman Patrician Agate, Montblanc 144 (lost :(), Omas Ogiva Arco Brown (flex), Omas 360 Arco Brown, Delta Sevivon (stub), Montblanc 146 (1950s), Omas 360 Grey (stub), Omas 360 Wild (stub), Swan M2


#5 aurore

aurore

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 357 posts

Posted 20 July 2018 - 11:52

Are Diamine inks in general safe for celluloids? What about Pelikan Edelstein and GvFC?



#6 sansenri

sansenri

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,664 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 16 December 2018 - 17:11

The safest inks are almost always the high water content, low additive content inks, which usually means dry (low lubrication), not highly saturated, neutral pH, inks.

These are usually the classic lines, Pelikan 4001 (and Edelstein), Waterman, J.Herbin, Aurora, Visconti, Montblanc, and few others.

Some of these inks are not always loved because they look "washed out", however that's the reason why they are safe (besides the fact that their characteristics are not always a drawback - I love some of these inks exactly for their characteristics)

Several Diamine inks are highly saturated, they may probably be safe, but I would avoid risk of staining celluloid with the highly concentrated ones (eg. Sargasso, Majestic, and especially some of the reds). Many Noodlers and Private Reserve are also highly saturated.

Akkerman shocking looks highly saturated too...

Iroshizuku are known to be alkaline (if that may affect celluloid I don't know), they should not be mixed with other inks to avoid precipitates.

I do tend to stick to my safer inks in my celluloid pens.



#7 eharriett

eharriett

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,466 posts
  • Location:Mansfield, Ohio
  • Flag:

Posted 16 December 2018 - 17:40

I need to be educated about this, as I have never heard of this problem before.  Unless you are eyedroppering the pen, I would not expect the ink to come in contact with the celluloid body.  Even if there is some "fuming" from the ink, I would not expect the ink to remain in the pen long enough to cause damage to the celluloid structure of a pen body. 

 

Scientifically, what am I not knowing?  I have my share of vintage celluloid-body pens.  What harm is being caused by not taking ink interactivity with the pen body into account?  None of my celluloid pens have ink that is expected to touch the body.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: ph, celluloid, akkermann, iroshizuko



Sponsored Content




|