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Pelikan M101N Lizard

m101n pelikan lizard

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#1 Driften

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Posted 26 May 2018 - 17:07

Not long ago I had decided I had enough pens and should focus on enjoying them. Then on a whim I bought a Pelikan M120 Iconic Blue with Broad nib and I remembered how nice the smaller Pelikan pens were. My favorite pen is a Pelikan M805 and my m200 and m215 have been sitting unloved for the most part. The M120 works so well for pocket carry it woke the need to get a few more pens. I next bought an vintage 400 with OM nib and while I was waiting for it to come from Europe I just needed to scratch the need for a 100n style pen, but I wanted one with modern materials that I would not have to worry about becoming brittle or celluloid shrinkage any time soon. One of the things that bothered me about m200-m400 series pens is the friction fit piston housing. Like the vintage 100/100n/101n or my m805 the piston housing on this pen unscrews. I have never needed to remove the piston on my m200 that I got back in 2008, but it's a feature that feels right to me. It's just elegant that the pen was built to be disassembled from the cap down to the piston. 

 

So why the m101n lizard? I could have gone with the brown tortoise and maybe some day I would get that, but more likely I would go vintage for similar styled Pelikans now that I have one that I don't worry about being in my pocket on the go. 

 

The nib on this pen is fairly standard modern Pelikan M gold nib. Smooth with out being over polished. Everybody says the nibs run wide but this M puts down a 0.55mm line on Rhoda paper which is half way between fine and medium. It does not take much pressure to bring the line width to 0.8mm, but in my normal writing it stays at 0.55mm. My m805 M writes with a 0.6mm line. I must write with a softer hand then most people to not experience these gold nibs being wider then standard. I have the pen inked with Robert Oster Blue Water Ice and I love the shading I get with this nib. Remember it's also easy to swap a vintage 400 nib into this pen for a different writing experience.

 

I think the design of the pen is very classy. The lizard pattern reminds me of carbon fiber with it's swirl of different shades of gray. Pictures don't do justice to the depth this material has. The gray ink window is very easy to use. It does hide the ink color but it does not take strong light to see your ink levels. It's like the m120 Iconic Blue in that. The shape of the cap final makes it very easy to remove the pen from a shirt pocket or the pen pocket on my shorts. In pictures it seems too tall but it's not at all in person. This feature is part of why it's my favorite for pocket carry. The cap does not post very deep, but on mine it posts securely. I have medium sized hands and it's easy for me to write with posted or not. I expect people with larger hands would only be able to use it posted, just like a m400. 

 

This is not an inexpensive pen. I was able to get from a FPN user this pen un-inked for $400. I could have gotten an m800 or one of the special edition m600's for less from Cult Pens. I have seen these listed on eBay for much more. You can also pick up vintage 100n's for less money, or in restored condition more. For me it was worth the money. I smile every time I see it sitting on my desk asking to be picked up. It's size and light weight makes it a great pen to carry around when I would have left my m805 on my desk. It being a 175th anniversary edition does not hurt, but also does not stop me from using it.

 

It's strange the re-introduced m101n's have not gotten a lot of love. It would be cool if Pelikan re-introduced the Magnum model that was a little larger then the 100n it proceeded. Having a slight larger and thicker model I think might have gone over better with todays market.

 

PelikanM101nLizard-1.png

 

PelikanM101nLizard-2.png



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#2 oregano

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Posted 26 May 2018 - 17:12

Beautiful m101n Lizard, Driften! I'm glad to hear that you carry this one with you rather than keeping it at your desk. The m101n brown tortoise remains one of my favorite pens even after a few years. I've often thought of adding the lizard too. I beg to differ, i do think the m101n gets a lot of love among collectors, which is why they command such high prices...

 


#3 bhbarto

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Posted 26 May 2018 - 17:47

The M101ns are very nice but a bit expensive. I thought the M800s were the perfect size for me but I just picked up a M200 Smoky Quartz and I love the size. Need to get a vintage M400 next!

Pen(s) Currently in Rotation:

ASA Daily (Medium) - Iroshizuku Murasaki-shikibu

Baoer 388 (Medium) - Diamine Kensington Blue

Sailor 1911 Large (Broad) - Sailor Tokiwa-matsu

Jinhao 159 (Medium) - J. Herbin Orange Indien

Sheaffer Snorkel Desk Pen (Medium) - Lamy Blue-Black


#4 invisuu

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Posted 26 May 2018 - 18:35

Very nice post, thanks for the pleasant read. If I were a rich man, Id collect these pens in a heartbeat. Theyre lookers and this lizard is amongst the most beautiful to me. Congrats on the purchase!

#5 Driften

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Posted 26 May 2018 - 18:41

Beautiful m101n Lizard, Driften! I'm glad to hear that you carry this one with you rather than keeping it at your desk. The m101n brown tortoise remains one of my favorite pens even after a few years. I've often thought of adding the lizard too. I beg to differ, i do think the m101n gets a lot of love among collectors, which is why they command such high prices...

 

 

I said they don't much love based off there being so few reviews of them. Most of the reviews are for the newer red model. They also don't seem to sell very fast. The one I bought was on the market just over two weeks and it's red tortoise sister is still available. Lets also face the fact that it came out four years ago and some dealers still have some unsold for less then list price. It seems like for the most part the collectors that wanted one have one. It could also be the lizard model sold for more then the others in the series and for the collectors that got excited about the idea when it was not the same lizard look as the 1937-1951 version were disappointed and did not buy like Pelikan hoped.

 

On the other hand the Pelikan Originals of their time 1935 100 reissues are going for $1100-$1500. It seems like collectors went nuts over them. Which is too bad since I would love to have a blue lapis one, but not for $1100.  



#6 Driften

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Posted 26 May 2018 - 19:21

Just thought I would add some group shots.

SixPelikanGroup-1.png

m200, m215, m120 Iconic blue, vintage 400, m101n lizard, m805

 

SixPelikanGroup-2.png

 

It's hard to tell from the photo, but the m101n is about 2mm longer then the m120 posted.



#7 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 26 May 2018 - 21:41

It was and is too expensive for me to even think of............but the great point is, ""Remember it's also easy to swap a vintage 400 nib into this pen for a different writing experience."""

 

Though to also get shading with a semi-flex nib which is wetter then regular flex, one has to have a very good ink to paper match.

 

Normally when I chase shading I go semi-vintage  '82-97' regular flex or the modern 200.

Luckily I do have a dryer semi-flex nib. :)

 

Humm, wonder why it's not inked. :unsure:

 

To, too many pens. :headsmack:

 

I had an interest in a Soennecken Lizard, which was once 'almost' affordable at E350.....but I wanted the Herringbone and E500 which remains a grail pen of mine....and is probably 1/3 more expensive.

 

Time to double my speculative investments.

Play the lottery twice.


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 26 May 2018 - 21:44.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#8 The Good Captain

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Posted 27 May 2018 - 06:59

I love these 'new' M101Ns and although none are in my rotation at the moment they will always be a joy to use. I think my favourite will always be the Green/Brown tortoise, with the Tortoiseshell Red a close second.


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#9 Mastiff

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Posted 27 May 2018 - 14:44

I absolutely love my m101 Lizard. Like you said in the review the aesthethics of this pen is incomparable, and in addition it has a beautiful springy nib. I had mine modified to a medium stub my Mottishaw. It is one of my best writers, and above all, it is the only singing nib that I have.



#10 Driften

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Posted 27 May 2018 - 15:27

I love these 'new' M101Ns and although none are in my rotation at the moment they will always be a joy to use. I think my favourite will always be the Green/Brown tortoise, with the Tortoiseshell Red a close second.

 

 

I think a lot of people place the lizard finish as 3rd place. I had thought about getting the brown with tortoise model, but the lizard kept calling me. Maybe if I had ever seen one of the tortoise models in hand things would have been different. Maybe some day I will get one.



#11 Driften

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Posted 27 May 2018 - 15:31

I absolutely love my m101 Lizard. Like you said in the review the aesthethics of this pen is incomparable, and in addition it has a beautiful springy nib. I had mine modified to a medium stub my Mottishaw. It is one of my best writers, and above all, it is the only singing nib that I have.

 

I go thought phases. Sometimes I am all about writing with stubs and CI's and other times I would rather use a nice round nib, On wider nibs I really want them to have a CI. I have a couple of pens that I am thinking about having reground. I think this medium I will keep as a round nib. If it was a B I would be more tempted to get it reground. 

 

I had tried a used m101n lizard before getting this one and its nib did the singing thing. Not sure if I liked that or not. This one does not. 



#12 Driften

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Posted 27 May 2018 - 15:39

It was and is too expensive for me to even think of............but the great point is, ""Remember it's also easy to swap a vintage 400 nib into this pen for a different writing experience."""

 

Though to also get shading with a semi-flex nib which is wetter then regular flex, one has to have a very good ink to paper match.

 

Normally when I chase shading I go semi-vintage  '82-97' regular flex or the modern 200.

Luckily I do have a dryer semi-flex nib. :)

 

Humm, wonder why it's not inked. :unsure:

...

 

In pens with wet nibs I find going with a little dryer inks to help but it seems to also just be a function of the ink. My pilot inks tend to be on the wet side but Ku-Jaku seems to shade in wet pens anyways. Some Montblanc inks shade in my wetter nibs. The inks that really seem to shade the best for me are the Robert Oster ones. Not all of their inks do but it seems like many of their inks have shading properties. My favorite right now is Blue Water Ice. I have that also in the 50's 400 and I think it shades some but not as much as in my modern nibs. 

 

Check out this site on reviews of inks that are known to shade well https://www.mountain...og/shading-inks



#13 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 27 May 2018 - 18:05

Wheee! Robert Oster Fire and Ice with a medium nib............regular flex or more rigid?

That's some hellactious shading.

I don't have that Japanese paper....how's the shading on other good papers?

 I defiantly have to think about that ink.

Going to have to go to Ink Reviews and see what other Ostler inks are shade monsters.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#14 Driften

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Posted 27 May 2018 - 21:24

Wheee! Robert Oster Fire and Ice with a medium nib............regular flex or more rigid?

That's some hellactious shading.

I don't have that Japanese paper....how's the shading on other good papers?

 I defiantly have to think about that ink.

Going to have to go to Ink Reviews and see what other Ostler inks are shade monsters.

 

 

I am getting shading from my 50's 400 on cheep Sugar Cane paper from Office Depot so I would think you would get some one good paper. It's better on Rhodia. My m120 iconic blue and this m101n lizard are doing a little better shading then the vintage pen but they are putting down a wider line. 

 

I have bottles of three Robert Oster Inks, Blue Water Ice, Soda Pop, and Fire and Ice. They are in the blue family and all shade nice. Fire and Ice has some good sheen on Rhodia. I just care more about shading then sheen. 



#15 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 28 May 2018 - 07:08

I have mostly German pens. Mostly I get better shading on my semi-vintage regular flex nibs, in they are dryer than the vintage semi-flex; shading is sometimes swallowed by ink flow. With semi-flex to also get shading one needs to match the ink and paper more.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#16 Bold2013

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Posted 28 May 2018 - 18:31

How do the m120 and 101n nibs compare?

#17 sargetalon

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Posted 28 May 2018 - 19:11

 

 

I think a lot of people place the lizard finish as 3rd place. I had thought about getting the brown with tortoise model, but the lizard kept calling me. Maybe if I had ever seen one of the tortoise models in hand things would have been different. Maybe some day I will get one.

 

 

The Lizard is a nice pen but I agree that it does fall down in many people's rankings, mine included.  I like every release in the series better than this one.  I think that when you look at the reproduction Lizard compared with the original, well there just isn't a comparison.  The original's material just has a better feel/look to it.  That's not to say that the Lizard isn't a great pen in its own right.  That's the great thing about the variety of Pelikan's releases.  Glad to hear that you're enjoying yours.  Thanks for sharing.


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#18 Driften

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Posted 29 May 2018 - 16:50

How do the m120 and 101n nibs compare?

 

 

The m120 nibs is slightly softer of the two. It needs a little less pressure to spread the tines and they went a little wider. They are both great nibs and I like them both. 



#19 Driften

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Posted 29 May 2018 - 16:57

 

 

The Lizard is a nice pen but I agree that it does fall down in many people's rankings, mine included.  I like every release in the series better than this one.  I think that when you look at the reproduction Lizard compared with the original, well there just isn't a comparison.  The original's material just has a better feel/look to it.  That's not to say that the Lizard isn't a great pen in its own right.  That's the great thing about the variety of Pelikan's releases.  Glad to hear that you're enjoying yours.  Thanks for sharing.

 

Your review on your three m101n's was helpful when I was thinking about buying one.  Believe me Pelikan's Perch is one of my early stops on selecting a new bird. I think Pelikan should have not called the new one Lizard, but they needed to match a name from the originals. It's not like they could call it snake when that was not used before on this type of pen.



#20 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 29 May 2018 - 17:01

"""Sugar Cane paper from Office Depot''''''

I'd have to fly into the states...and that is no planned. I did finally order some 80&100g Rhoda after years of never getting around to it. Also finally getting some Clairefontaine Triumph.

 

For too long it was Whoops...another pen! Whoops more ink....and I do have some 30-40 papers** but feel like a paper 'noobie'.

 

**I was looking and somehow ended up with more 100% cotton than I need :unsure: ...in I chase shading and 100% cotton swallows shading.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 






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