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Creation Of The Nib

nibs bock germany

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#1 5Cavaliers

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Posted 30 April 2018 - 19:37

I am sure that many of you have already read this, but I just read this 2000 article on a tour of the Bock nib factory in Germany.  I found it totally fascinating and thought I would share the link.

 

https://www.nibs.com...es/nibs-germany

 

 



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#2 AAAndrew

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Posted 03 May 2018 - 14:14

Very interesting. They're basically following the same process I wrote about in my article on how they made steel pens in the 19th century. 

 

Cutting out the blanks

piercing

stamping

shaping

(the gold nibs are then tipped, steel nibs weren't)

grinding

slitting

finishing

 

Of course gold nibs don't require the softening, hardening and tempering steps, but it's basically the same. 

 

Thanks for sharing!



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#3 5Cavaliers

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Posted 03 May 2018 - 18:23

Very interesting. They're basically following the same process I wrote about in my article on how they made steel pens in the 19th century. 

 

Cutting out the blanks

piercing

stamping

shaping

(the gold nibs are then tipped, steel nibs weren't)

grinding

slitting

finishing

 

Of course gold nibs don't require the softening, hardening and tempering steps, but it's basically the same. 

 

Thanks for sharing!

 

 

What a great article!  Thank YOU for sharing your article with me.  Wow!  And the other histories are fascinating!  Thank you. 



#4 amberleadavis

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Posted 30 May 2018 - 02:26

Thank you for sharing the article. And Andrew thank you for your article.

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#5 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 30 May 2018 - 09:30

Andrew has it together; and one can tell how much work he's done....when one is enjoying one's self, work becomes as light as a feather. (What do you mean it's Saturday and I don't have to go to work! :gaah: :wallbash:....... :) )

Even if it is still 'work' to research, there is a self satisfaction, finding out new things in a field of interest.

 

I do have that Bock link, as part of my signature. The Bock factory is some 30 minute drive from where I live......if it wasn't for all the cars, 15 minutes.

 

Lamy is 15 minutes away, and I have done a newspaper won factory tour, where I saw the 5-6 foot tall, 4-5 yard wide, 10 yard long steel nib making machine. All the work out of sight.

The only thing one can see is the single worker changing thin diamond dusted rubber cutting disks.


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 30 May 2018 - 09:55.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

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