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Please Help Me To Identify A FriendíS Lost Parker From His Description


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#1 Methersgate

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Posted 16 April 2018 - 23:17

I have an old friend, an American academic in his seventies, who has done me several kindnesses over the past twenty years.

Recently he asked to borrow a pen and I offered him the Vacumatic that I had in my pocket. He remarked on it and said that he had once had a nice Parker, but he had lost it when his baggage went missing in North Africa.

I asked him to describe it; he said that it was brushed stainless steel, all over, it had come with what from his description was an Aerometric filler, but when he had sent it in for repair this had been replaced with a twist piston thing that he had liked better and the nib had, at his request, been changed from medium to fine.

Can anyone identify such a Parker? Id like to replace it for him.

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#2 gweimer1

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Posted 16 April 2018 - 23:27

It could be a Parker 45 flighter.  



#3 Methersgate

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Posted 16 April 2018 - 23:34

Thanks!

#4 Jerome Tarshis

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Posted 16 April 2018 - 23:36

Or a 75 Flighter. Or a Frontier in stainless steel. Or, or, or.

 

The description fits any Parker pen that took cartridges or converters and was offered in stainless steel. There were many, many such pens. Let us have some further information, if possible. The impulse is a generous one.



#5 gweimer1

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Posted 16 April 2018 - 23:43

Anything about the nib would really help.  What did it look like?  I went with Parker 45 because both parts you mentioned are easily swapped.



#6 Old Salt

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Posted 17 April 2018 - 01:18

Sounds like a P-51 flighter. If he sent it in for repairs in the late 50’s, early 60’s, it could well have had its Areometric “squeeze” filler replaced with a piston converter. For a brief period Parker changed over to a converter fill system in the ‘51. The design didn’t last long, originals are tough to find.

#7 mitto

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Posted 17 April 2018 - 02:07

Well, I don't think it was a 'change over'. The regular aeromtric filler 51s continued to be produced in that brief period when the C/C filler 51s were introduced by Parker.

Again the Parker piston converter is fairly modern. Those C/C filled P51s came with the old fatty Parker squeeze converters that later came with P75s and P45s.

Edited by mitto, 17 April 2018 - 02:08.

Khan

#8 Methersgate

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Posted 17 April 2018 - 17:28

I emailed him the link from Penography. He identified the Parker 35 Flighter as the pen in question.

All I have to do now is find one!






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