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New And Improved ‘Triveni Junior’, From Fountain Pen Revolution

fpr indian triveni fountain pen revolution ebonite

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45 replies to this topic

#21 Nail-Bender

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Posted 08 April 2018 - 06:07

... and wondered what 'handmade by artisans' might mean. 

These are VERY well hand made pens by an Indian maker.

Not sure what the maker is but they are well beyond anything that Edison can do at 1/4 the price.

I recently got a Beaumont that was not nearly the quality.



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#22 Benpiggy

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 02:56

May I ask if one can swab a Jowo #6 nib?

 

Cheers



#23 Jamerelbe

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 03:13



May I ask if one can swab a Jowo #6 nib?

 

Cheers

 

Yep - no problem:

 

fpn_1523502752__triveni_jr_nibs.jpg


Edited by Jamerelbe, 12 April 2018 - 03:14.


#24 Benpiggy

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 15:01

Thank you so much!

 

One final question - is the nib friction fit and I just have to pull the old nib out?

 

Thank you :)



#25 TruthPil

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 15:06

Thank you so much!

 

One final question - is the nib friction fit and I just have to pull the old nib out?

 

Thank you :)

 

The original nib is part of a nib-feed-sleeve assembly unit that screws into the pen. 

However, the nib and feed are friction fit inside the sleeve, so you can just leave the sleeve in the pen, pull out the nib, and pop in your favorite #6 nib. 


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#26 Jamerelbe

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 15:12

Thank you so much!

 

One final question - is the nib friction fit and I just have to pull the old nib out?

 

Thank you :)

 

Yes, that's right: the nib and feed are friction fit, and come out fairly easily.  As far as I can tell, the black 'sleeve' that sits inside the grip section and holds the nib and feed is not removable - but that's no great drama.  

 

*Correction*: having just seen TruthPil's reply, I tried unscrewing the nib assembly, and discovered he was right: I was just being too gentle! The whole nib section does indeed screw out - it looks like it's the same assembly Kevin sells for the FPR Darjeeling, so you can buy these to swap in with ease.  But yes, you *can* just remove the nib (or the nib and feed) to replace with a JoWo #6.



#27 Jamerelbe

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 15:15

 

The original nib is part of a nib-feed-sleeve assembly unit that screws into the pen. 

However, the nib and feed are friction fit inside the sleeve, so you can just leave the sleeve in the pen, pull out the nib, and pop in your favorite #6 nib. 

 

I *did* try to screw out the whole nib assembly when my first #6 Triveni Jr arrived (I now have 2!  :o), but it didn't budge and I wasn't game to wrench too hard.  But you're right, it *does* unscrew (see above reply), and appears to be interchangeable with the nib units FPR sell on their site for the Darjeeling. 

 

That's really good to know  - so thanks for pointing it out!  It's one more reason to appreciate the Triveni!



#28 Jamerelbe

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 15:24

Can't resist the temptation: my two new Triveni Jrs (one ebonite, one acrylic, with #6 nib) compared to an older full-size acrylic Triveni.  The nib on the older pen looks almost comically small compared to the other two - but I can't deny it's a great writer!

 

fpn_1523546570__triveni_x3.jpg



#29 Benpiggy

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 17:31

Thank you so much.

 

I wonder which better - Junior or not Junior.  I like to write with pen both posted or unposted. The non Junior seems to be long when posted (7 inch).

 

Any advice is welcome.

 

I am Asian, standard or small in size  :)



#30 Jamerelbe

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 23:58

Thank you so much.

 

I wonder which better - Junior or not Junior.  I like to write with pen both posted or unposted. The non Junior seems to be long when posted (7 inch).

 

Any advice is welcome.

 

I am Asian, standard or small in size  :)

 

It's a matter of personal preference of course, but I find the Triveni very long - 150mm capped, 137mm uncapped, ~175mm posted.  The materials are quite light, so it doesn't feel back-heavy when posted, but looks almost ridiculously long (to me).

 

The Triveni Jr has the same diameter but is shorter - ~130mm capped, 125mm uncapped, 155mm posted.  With my medium-sized male Caucasian hands, the Triveni Jr is quite comfortable to write with unposted, but I have a slight preference for posted.  I also prefer the 'balance' of length to breadth - though it's not a slim pen, the 'regular' Triveni *looks* thinner because of the extra cm or so of length.

 

Please be aware too that my measurements are a little different from those on the website.  That's one of the features of these pens being "handmade by artisans" - there's a bit of variation from pen to pen!



#31 Jamerelbe

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 00:01

All of which is to say, I like the Triveni, but I *really* like the Triveni Junior.  The only thing I'd like *better still* would be a FPR Himalaya adapted for a #6 nib - and maybe with a larger (non-eyedropper) ink reservoir!



#32 Tseg

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 01:08

I'll finally have my hands on my Triveni Jr. for the first time tomorrow evening.  I like pens without a step from section to barrel and it looks like this pen is of that same mold.



#33 Jamerelbe

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 01:48

I'll finally have my hands on my Triveni Jr. for the first time tomorrow evening.  I like pens without a step from section to barrel and it looks like this pen is of that same mold.

 

The barrel 'levels up' very slightly just before the threads, but I wouldn't call it a 'step' - and the threads themselves are very smooth.  I like to hold my pens a little further back when the design permits, so with the Triveni I tend to find my fingers resting on the threads - even so, it's a very comfortable writing experience for me.



#34 Benpiggy

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 03:37

 

It's a matter of personal preference of course, but I find the Triveni very long - 150mm capped, 137mm uncapped, ~175mm posted.  The materials are quite light, so it doesn't feel back-heavy when posted, but looks almost ridiculously long (to me).

 

The Triveni Jr has the same diameter but is shorter - ~130mm capped, 125mm uncapped, 155mm posted.  With my medium-sized male Caucasian hands, the Triveni Jr is quite comfortable to write with unposted, but I have a slight preference for posted.  I also prefer the 'balance' of length to breadth - though it's not a slim pen, the 'regular' Triveni *looks* thinner because of the extra cm or so of length.

 

Please be aware too that my measurements are a little different from those on the website.  That's one of the features of these pens being "handmade by artisans" - there's a bit of variation from pen to pen!

 

Thank you.  Junior it is !



#35 Tseg

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Posted 14 April 2018 - 15:29

I now have The Jr. with the Flex nib.  Never mind flexing, writing with it as a fine nib pen works fantastic.  No hard starts, no skipping.  It is pretty sensitive to railroading if trying to push flexing.  It is a pretty smooth writer to the point I've not yet taken micro-mesh to it, so that is saying something.  Also no nib leaking.  FPR threw in an Indus pen with plastic nib feed as a promotion with the purchase and that pen has ink feed starvation and then burps ink.  I've already de-inked that one.  This Triveni Jr. is a keeper.  My picture may not portray it, but I first thought it was brown and black vs. 'maroon' and black.  In person it has a rich wood look.  I really like the small size yet no issue using unposted.  For the price it is one heck of a pen.  It is a good value.  The #6 nib goes great with the size.  The converter does not seems to clamp on super tight, but it seems to be working fine.  There are 1 or two tiny white specs/micro-nicks in the ebonite finish, but overall good ebonite quality.  The cap to barrel patterns seem to match pretty well when capped.  Glad I made the purchase.

 

39643171770_926c4d5ec6_k.jpg



#36 Nail-Bender

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Posted 14 April 2018 - 16:16

It is pretty sensitive to railroading if trying to push flexing. 

After I switched from a converter to a sac, the R/R went away and it became perfectly wet.



#37 Tseg

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Posted 14 April 2018 - 16:23

After I switched from a converter to a sac, the R/R went away and it became perfectly wet.

 

With the converter it is very juicy for regular writing, and won't R/R if I prime before writing, but maybe I'll look into that.



#38 flyingpenman

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Posted 21 April 2018 - 17:26

This thread is making it hard for me to resist one of these especially since I have not tried an ebonite pen— that red and black looks better than I would have expected from the website. And with a #6 nib too...

Still no regrets with the flex nib, Tseg, Jamerelbe, or anyone else who has tried it?
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#39 Tseg

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Posted 21 April 2018 - 19:42

This thread is making it hard for me to resist one of these especially since I have not tried an ebonite pen— that red and black looks better than I would have expected from the website. And with a #6 nib too...

Still no regrets with the flex nib, Tseg, Jamerelbe, or anyone else who has tried it?

 

No regrets with my red and black ebonite that looks like rich burl wood.  The nib with Diamine Sherwood (Green) is flawless for normal writing.  It is a nice wet writer, no skips or hard starts... but not ideal for flexi-writing, but then again, I'm not a flexi-writer, so maybe i don't know.  It will railroad with some pressure.  It writes like Western Fine.

 

40736945384_645566e217_k.jpg



#40 IndigoBOB

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Posted 10 May 2018 - 20:00

I picked up a regular/larger Triveni Ebonite, but it was a bit too long for me.  Not as bad as some of the Ranga's, but I sent it back to exchange it for the Junior.

 

Besides the length I thought the dimensions were fantastic.  And since I can exchange a Jowo into it I'm happy about the potential versatility...

 

Ive been very happy with my Himalaya-FPR.Medium nib (not tuning done to it) and have been reaching for it instead of pens 5X that price in my line up.  

 

I tried the Noodler's Ebonite Konrad and was so disappointed in that pen; I ordered a couple because they had terrible QC problems with cracks in the inner components, couldn't fit Jowo's, and their available nibs, especially the nonflex nibs, were probably the worst nibs I've ever used, simply requiring tinkering no matter what.

 

I'm really happy with what FPR is doing.


Edited by IndigoBOB, 10 May 2018 - 20:02.






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