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Ink Stains Vs. Granite Countertops - How To Remove?

ink stain granite conutertop removal removing cleaning stains

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81 replies to this topic

#61 Strelnikoff

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 15:57

Don't you have "Sally's" hairdressing supplies stores in the US? You can buy HP at more than 3% solution there.

 

I have androgenic alopecia - i.e. I'm fairly hair challenged on top of my head, so I never thought about that. Thanks for the idea!

Formulae for ink stain removal from granite is building here :) 



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#62 Strelnikoff

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 16:00

 

You sound like the company that did the kitchen for the house my brother-in-law and his wife had built.  My brother-in-law's wife kept insisting that soapstone was "better" than granite because she was told that granite would crack if you put hot items (like pots) directly on the counter.  Well, I've had granite counters in my kitchen for 20 years and haven't had that problem (except for some chips around the sink, which my husband is convinced were caused by the cleaning lady being careless with stuff).  Of course our countertops are about an inch and a half thick.  (A friend of ours, who had gone to culinary school was appalled that we weren't getting stainless steel counters, but that's another story....)

Part of the reason that soapstone is often used for sinks and countertops is because it's SOFT and therefore easy to work.  I just checked and soapstone has a MOHS rating of 1; granite is 7 (diamond is  the hardest stone, at rating of 10).  It may be easy to clean, but it can get scratched.

I do know that you *don't* want marble in a kitchen (with the possible exception of a marble rolling pin and/or a section of counter to roll out dough on -- because that apparently stains quite easily....

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

 

I would "argue" that most of the granite countertops installed around - are not truly granite, but all kinds of rocks. 



#63 KLscribbler

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 18:22

No new ideas to contribute in either the stain removal or the humor department, but I have to thank the OP for starting this thread. I frequently refill my pens with Ku Jaku next to my kitchen sink, right on top of my granite countertop. Guess I should do all my refilling in the bathroom from now on.

 

You have probably saved me from Kujakunobyl II: The Azure Apocalypse. (This being the original Kujakunobyl...) So - thank you! :thumbup:



#64 Astron

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 22:49

If the stain won't go away... There is alway ONE solution to the problem.

 

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#65 ErrantSmudge

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 23:49

I make a point of putting some layers of paper towel down on the counter, and setting the ink bottle in the middle of it.  Won't protect from a spill (see the other thread on that topic), but it does protect from the odd drip or splash here and there.

 

I also always grab the bottle firmly with one hand and hold it down against the countertop while I screw or unscrew the cap.  I am so klutzy, I would tip the bottle otherwise.   And I immediately recap the bottle first thing once the pen is filled.



#66 Runnin_Ute

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Posted 20 March 2018 - 01:59

I make a point of putting some layers of paper towel down on the counter, and setting the ink bottle in the middle of it.  Won't protect from a spill (see the other thread on that topic), but it does protect from the odd drip or splash here and there.

 

I also always grab the bottle firmly with one hand and hold it down against the countertop while I screw or unscrew the cap.  I am so klutzy, I would tip the bottle otherwise.   And I immediately recap the bottle first thing once the pen is filled.

I do something along these lines (and I have circa 1973 Formica). A minimum of one full section of the daily paper. Two is better. Both for cleaning and filling. Generally speaking it takes care of things. A narrow bottle like Robert Oster fits perfectly inside a shot glass and gives it a bigger, heavier base. Noodler's although tall, because the ones I have are a little wider and glass so a bit heavier. Most of my others have wider bases than tops. (Diamine, Pelikan, Waterman, Levenger, Lamy)


Brad
 
"Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind" - Rudyard Kipling
"None of us can have as many virtues as the fountain-pen, or half its cussedness; but we can try." - Mark Twain
 


#67 Parker51

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Posted 20 March 2018 - 02:39

I spilled some Monteverde Turquoise today on a resilient desk top and as usual, I cleaned it up with alcohol based hand sanitizer. No stain left, just a clean surface and some turquoise colored facial tissues to discard.

#68 dcwaites

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Posted 20 March 2018 - 04:11

Before we get to the C4 (which may have the unfortunate side-effect of distributing the kitchen into the neighbour's back yard), do the job properly. Use an angle-grider with a masonry wheel...


fpn_1412827311__pg_d_104def64.gif

 

 

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And someone has to speak up for them as has no voices.”

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#69 Strelnikoff

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Posted 20 March 2018 - 22:44

Or move... out of apartment... :)  safest option 



#70 Ron Z

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Posted 20 March 2018 - 22:55

Have you tried Amodex, which is an effective stain and ink remover?  There was a time that it was on the lips of every one on FPN, but seems to have been forgotten. 

 

There's also Ink Nix, and other ink removing agents which might work.  ...and ordinary shampoo can be very effective in getting ink off of your hands, so may work here.


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#71 Strelnikoff

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Posted 21 March 2018 - 04:08

Have you tried Amodex, which is an effective stain and ink remover?  There was a time that it was on the lips of every one on FPN, but seems to have been forgotten. 

 

There's also Ink Nix, and other ink removing agents which might work.  ...and ordinary shampoo can be very effective in getting ink off of your hands, so may work here.

 

I have not tried that. I've tried koh-i-noor whatever is the name... ink something (I forgot)... 

 

Amodex - my experience- worked on my hands :)  I think that's what I've used once or twice... 

 

Problem is - ink seeped in the cracks... 



#72 SamCapote

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Posted 21 March 2018 - 04:55

I say it's time to quite screwing around with this, and burn out the stains with some thermite.  You'll be left with a great conversation piece.


With the new FPN rules, now I REALLY don't know what to put in my signature.

#73 Strelnikoff

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Posted 21 March 2018 - 16:25

I say it's time to quite screwing around with this, and burn out the stains with some thermite.  You'll be left with a great conversation piece.

 

And film it? And prepare a statement for TV before I get taken by federales :D 



#74 PatientType

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Posted 21 March 2018 - 18:52

You've only a few spots. I've read that most water-based fountain pen inks will fade out completely in six months of exposure to UV light. After you've faded the spots as much as possible with hydrogen peroxide and other chemical agents, it might be worth trying UV. For about $20 you can obtain a small UV light (sold for drying fingernail polish). Leaving the low-wattage light burning over a spot might further fade it and make the discoloration less noticeable. You could leave the light burning over one of the spots for a month or so and then compare it to the others and, if it worked, just repeat for all the spots.



#75 Strelnikoff

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Posted 21 March 2018 - 19:28

You've only a few spots. I've read that most water-based fountain pen inks will fade out completely in six months of exposure to UV light. After you've faded the spots as much as possible with hydrogen peroxide and other chemical agents, it might be worth trying UV. For about $20 you can obtain a small UV light (sold for drying fingernail polish). Leaving the low-wattage light burning over a spot might further fade it and make the discoloration less noticeable. You could leave the light burning over one of the spots for a month or so and then compare it to the others and, if it worked, just repeat for all the spots.

 

Excellent! I'll do that!

 

One day - if this is sorted out - I will compile the useful suggestions "Best Practices" :)



#76 TSherbs

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Posted 21 March 2018 - 19:39

 
Excellent! I'll do that!
 
One day - if this is sorted out - I will compile the useful suggestions "Best Practices" :)


love to hear,

#77 sansenri

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Posted 21 March 2018 - 20:36

I love all the disclaimers in this thread.

Translation: "Since you're asking, I'll give you my unprofessional and often uninformed and not-legally-liable advice: hit it with a blowtorch while lit (you, on booze) on a ladder and film it for us to laugh at." Gotta love the internet.

the disclaimers are really necessary...

 

granite is one of the most beautiful, because natural, but alas delicate materials to make a kitchen countertop with...

 

I used to have a pink black white granite top from stones coming from Sardinia in the kitchen, with time it has become stained with oil from cooking. There is no real way to make it come clean, although some of the mentioned remedies have some effect.

The problem with granite being a natural stone is that it is porous and not only it can be stained but also will lose shine with some of the cleaning products.

So I do recommend caution and best bet is to ask for professional advise, as I mentioned.

 

(When I recently changed my top, it I opted for okite, a modern synthetic stone made of quartz base, resin and coloured pigments, it is stain resistant to almost anything, very tough, and looks almost  - but not quite - like granite.)



#78 sansenri

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Posted 21 March 2018 - 21:44

PS  just out of curiosity, a shot of the okite top... :D

(not as beautiful as true granite, by far)

fpn_1521668527__p1080629-3.jpg



#79 Newjelan

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Posted 23 March 2018 - 09:28

At the risk of over-simplifying things, my experience with spots of ink (usually Noodler’s BSB) on pale granite bench tops and also on a “brush box” (native timber) dining table, is that it wears away over time. Which is rather fortunate for a clutz like me. (About 3 months on the bench and 3 years on the table.)

#80 Strelnikoff

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Posted 26 March 2018 - 00:37

At the risk of over-simplifying things, my experience with spots of ink (usually Noodler’s BSB) on pale granite bench tops and also on a “brush box” (native timber) dining table, is that it wears away over time. Which is rather fortunate for a clutz like me. (About 3 months on the bench and 3 years on the table.)

 

I'm really trying not to do it again :)







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: ink, stain, granite, conutertop, removal, removing, cleaning, stains



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