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Eyedropper Pen Filling

eyedropper indian fountain pen

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26 replies to this topic

#1 Dip n Scratch

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Posted 10 March 2018 - 18:30

For those who have a eyedropper type fountain pen: How do you fill the barrel with ink from the bottle?
I have just received an Indian Ebonite Eyedropper pen and I am wondering what devices you use.



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#2 escribo

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Posted 10 March 2018 - 18:38

Never mind.


I may not have been much help, but I DID bump your thread up to the top.


#3 Noihvo

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Posted 10 March 2018 - 19:05

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#4 scribo12

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Posted 15 March 2018 - 16:30

Blunt syringes:  Plenty of choices available on Amazon - very inexpensive.

 

Eyedropper - stainless steel:  Here's a different eyedropper question:

 

I 'm aware that metal pens are not recommended for use as eyedropper pens because of concerns that the metal will react with the ink and both corrode the pen and contaminate the ink.  This makes sense with pens made of aluminum and brass, which are quite reactive, but would a stainless steel pen be suitable for use as an eyedropper pen?



#5 scribo12

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Posted 15 March 2018 - 16:47

More on syringes:  Also, you can usually get large bore syringes at hardware stores that sell farm supply items, but they will gave a sharp point.


Edited by scribo12, 15 March 2018 - 16:50.


#6 amberleadavis

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Posted 15 March 2018 - 17:59

I use transfer pipettes.  

 

http://www.lcmlab.co...pettes_s/80.htm


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#7 Torrilin

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Posted 15 March 2018 - 18:33

Blunt syringes:  Plenty of choices available on Amazon - very inexpensive.
 
Eyedropper - stainless steel:  Here's a different eyedropper question:
 
I 'm aware that metal pens are not recommended for use as eyedropper pens because of concerns that the metal will react with the ink and both corrode the pen and contaminate the ink.  This makes sense with pens made of aluminum and brass, which are quite reactive, but would a stainless steel pen be suitable for use as an eyedropper pen?


I personally wouldn’t trust it. Stainless is still plenty reactive compared to a noble gas. And I’m not at all sure that the average pen manufacturer would be dealing with the porosity issue in a way that is safe.

Stainless is a reasonable excuse for non reactive for cooking purposes, but you hopefully aren’t using lab chemicals in your kitchen. Too much risk of accidental contamination. And clean for cooking purposes is unfortunately not sure to be clean enough to prevent side reactions. And with ink it’s the side reactions that we worry about. (In fact that is exactly what you’re checking for when you mix ink and wait to see if it forms blobs or does anything else funny)

And well, side reactions where metals get involved can be... icky. Like on fire type icky.

#8 zaddick

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Posted 15 March 2018 - 20:04

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#9 Charles Rice

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Posted 15 March 2018 - 20:06

Syringe - pointed  ( I have never understood the need for a blunt )



#10 torstar

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Posted 15 March 2018 - 20:29

real syringe, asked for it for my fountain pen hobby and walked out of the pharmacy with 5 of them



#11 Charles Rice

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Posted 15 March 2018 - 21:22

i just got back from my local farm supply store.  Syringes start at 19 cents (USD) for the 5ml size and go all the way up to $1.10 for the mongo 60ml size.  And for a little quicker filling, the cow/horse needles work better.  OK, so you live in London, Toronto, or New York City - I understand, you might not have a store like that right around the corner, but a good pet supply store should have what you need, or you must take a drive in the sticks now and then, don't you?  Blunt or sharp?  They'll both poke your eye out, and you're not really that much of a klutz are you?  And as the above poster noted, your local pharmacy will probably help you out.  (just don't look wired)


Edited by Charles Rice, 15 March 2018 - 21:24.


#12 torstar

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Posted 16 March 2018 - 14:33

when you talk about a real syringe, someone always brings up the concept of how neat it would be to inject FP ink into their skin with it....  uh huhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh.... cheque please..... TAXI !!!....


Edited by torstar, 16 March 2018 - 14:33.


#13 Charles Rice

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Posted 16 March 2018 - 23:28

when you talk about a real syringe, someone always brings up the concept of how neat it would be to inject FP ink into their skin with it....  uh huhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh.... cheque please..... TAXI !!!....

 

I learned from a local stationary shop that it is done for cheap tattoos.



#14 Dip n Scratch

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Posted 17 March 2018 - 07:43

In reference to post #6 I bought transfer pipettes.

The ink I will be using is 'safe' stuff, So no Noodlers Baystate Blue.

I have nothing against that ink, except that nit's not going into my Indian Ebonite eyedropper pen.



#15 Inkling13

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Posted 17 March 2018 - 07:52

Blunt syringes:  Plenty of choices available on Amazon - very inexpensive.
 
Eyedropper - stainless steel:  Here's a different eyedropper question:
 
I 'm aware that metal pens are not recommended for use as eyedropper pens because of concerns that the metal will react with the ink and both corrode the pen and contaminate the ink.  This makes sense with pens made of aluminum and brass, which are quite reactive, but would a stainless steel pen be suitable for use as an eyedropper pen?

Stainless, is just that. A stain-less steel, with stain=rust, that will still corrode given the correct conditions. I wouldnt trust it.

#16 Inkling13

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Posted 17 March 2018 - 07:54

In reference to post #6 I bought transfer pipettes.
The ink I will be using is 'safe' stuff, So no Noodlers Baystate Blue.
I have nothing against that ink, except that nit's not going into my Indian Ebonite eyedropper pen.

Of all materials ebonite is safe, unless its a colored ebonite with concerns of staining. The black cases of car acid batteries were originally made from ebonite, withstanding the acid within. Only now it has been replaced with carbon filled HDPE plastic.
Other than staining, BSB has not been shown in experiments to reproduce the nasty meltdown of pens as early reports touted. I would say it is as safe as any other supersaturated inks.

Edited by Inkling13, 17 March 2018 - 07:55.


#17 Ada

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Posted 18 March 2018 - 03:46

I use an eyedropper to fill eyedropper pens.  Out of curiousity, why are are so many of you using syringes instead of eyedroppers?


I've been on a quest to see if I could commit all Seven Deadly Sins in a single day. Finally, it dawned on me I shouldn't try for the One Day Wonder Prize for all seven in one day. It's simply out of any question as you can't commit decent sloth while busily ticking the other six off your crowded "to do" list. -- ViolinWriter

#18 dcwaites

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Posted 18 March 2018 - 05:46

There are multiple different sorts of stainless steel. Some start rusting the moment container of water wanders past, others will withstand the sea (especially useful on boats...).

 

Were you to have a pen with parts made of marine grade S/S, and you used pH neutral inks, and there were no other metals in the ink path (except for the nib, which is usually electrically isolated from the rest of the pen), then you should have no problems.

 

OTOH, it's going to be pretty heavy.


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#19 Noihvo

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Posted 18 March 2018 - 09:14



I use an eyedropper to fill eyedropper pens.  Out of curiousity, why are are so many of you using syringes instead of eyedroppers?

 

fpn_1521364446__img_3785.jpg


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#20 torstar

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 14:54

 

I learned from a local stationary shop that it is done for cheap tattoos.

 

not happy to learn this fact







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