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Crystallization ? Waterman Hundred Year

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#1 fountainpen51

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 20:10

Hello, do you have any idea if this is celluloid crystallization or maybe it is broken by the effort of removing the clip? I received this pen without the clip, the design of the cap on the outside is intact in its form, it only looks like that inside, so I have my doubts if it is crystallization or is broken by what I sense, when removing the clip? The rest of the pen is intact, the top of the other end is intact.
 
Do I have to take any precaution with the other celluloids?


Thanks

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#2 Polanova

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 20:40

Depends if it`s celluloid or precious resin  :P , therefore a picture of the whole pen might be helpful.

As far as I know the W100P was made from Precious Resin/Plexiglas/Acryl during 1939 - 1941 and afterwards from celluloid.

These are the pens were the pen`s ends may start crystalizing.

An easy way to find out is by scraping a supersmall bit of plastic from the inner barrel with a scalpel (just big enough so you can see it) & drown it in a drop of acetone - if it disolves, it`s celluloid, if not, plastic  :)



#3 fountainpen51

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 20:57

Depends if it`s celluloid or precious resin  :P , therefore a picture of the whole pen might be helpful.

As far as I know the W100P was made from Precious Resin/Plexiglas/Acryl during 1939 - 1941 and afterwards from celluloid.

These are the pens were the pen`s ends may start crystalizing.

An easy way to find out is by scraping a supersmall bit of plastic from the inner barrel with a scalpel (just big enough so you can see it) & drown it in a drop of acetone - if it disolves, it`s celluloid, if not, plastic  :)

From what I saw on the website of Richard Binder, this is celluloid and this has its camphor smell, I have no doubt of that. it is Maroon with the ends in amber, it seems that the top of the lid is darker.

http://www.richardsp...undred_year.htm

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Edited by fountainpen51, 06 March 2018 - 20:58.


#4 fountainpen51

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 21:04

Interior of the lid
 

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#5 Polanova

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 21:49

Darn, I guess you`re right. Well, in that case ...hm... the ambered end of the pen can be swapped with a translucent plastic. This seems almost like a routine work by experienced restorers, as I`ve seen a good number of examples. The cap might be more difficult to do. If you`re in Europe you could contact Fountainbel - I`m sure he`s up to this type of work. In the meantime I`d keep it away from other celluloid pens. The only alternative really is trying to find another cap/barrel.



#6 fountainpen51

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 22:16

Maybe that arrangement is more expensive than the pen ... I'll ask. Any idea how to remove the end? I have seen that in other photos it is like a screw, but in this I do not see it.

Darn, I guess you`re right. Well, in that case ...hm... the ambered end of the pen can be swapped with a translucent plastic. This seems almost like a routine work by experienced restorers, as I`ve seen a good number of examples. The cap might be more difficult to do. If you`re in Europe you could contact Fountainbel - I`m sure he`s up to this type of work. In the meantime I`d keep it away from other celluloid pens. The only alternative really is trying to find another cap/barrel.



#7 Polanova

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 22:32

I`m only guessing here - for restoring, the end thingy is likely to be sawed off. It`s definitely part of the barrel - nothing to screw off.

Don`t know if it`s worth restoring & what the cost would be. I do know that these pens are being restored. Let`s see what others say...

 

If the nib is still good (W100YP nibs are usually very good), you might look for a spare model or sell it for spares on fleabay.

I guess it`s the oversize model with a #5 nib? Still has enough iridium, is it rigid, semi-flexible?

 

It`s sad with these pens (It`s even worse with Wahl-Eversharp Dorics, btw, see here, if that`s a consolation cause these pens cannot be restored anymore):

http://www.fountainp...rocco-material/


Edited by Polanova, 06 March 2018 - 22:35.


#8 fountainpen51

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 22:43

I`m only guessing here - for restoring, the end thingy is likely to be sawed off. It`s definitely part of the barrel - nothing to screw off.

Don`t know if it`s worth restoring & what the cost would be. I do know that these pens are being restored. Let`s see what others say...

 

If the nib is still good (W100YP nibs are usually very good), you might look for a spare model or sell it for spares on fleabay.

I guess it`s the oversize model with a #5 nib? Still has enough iridium, is it rigid, semi-flexible?

 

It`s sad with these pens (It`s even worse with Wahl-Eversharp Dorics, btw, see here, if that`s a consolation cause these pens cannot be restored anymore):

http://www.fountainp...rocco-material/

 

It's a # 18 semi-flex nib. I think that in order to cut that part i have to remove the screw that goes from the "clip" to the inside.
 
How contagious is crystallization? Can it be in the same room?

Edited by fountainpen51, 06 March 2018 - 22:44.


#9 Polanova

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 22:51

I guess it can be in the same room (I said I guess!) but never store it with other celluloid pens in a pouch, case etc.

The crystallization process means outgassing and that can affect other celluloid pens. Store it seperately!

I wouldn`t tinker around with it if you can`t restore it yourself, what´s the point? 

Also there`s the colored end thingey on the barrel to think of.

 

I really feel with you reg the pen & that`s all I can tell you.

Maybe someone else will comment.



#10 fountainpen51

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 22:58

It is an effect of the lines of the paper what is seen, it is clean. My intention is to remove that extreme and throw it away so there are no problems with the other pens. It was a low price for him, so I do not know if it's worth putting a new one, to see if anyone else thinks something about this.



#11 fountainpen51

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 16:17

Update: I cut the tip and put in place the tip of the lid of a jinhao 992. It is not the best option, but it is an option if you have it in a drawer with no intention of fixing it.

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