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Which Pen Brands/models Have An Integrated Ink Fill System?


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#1 AlohaJim

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 15:00

Which pen brands/models have an integrated ink fill system?

 

In other words, pens that do not have a converter and the ink fill system is integral to the pen and has less chance of leaking, the pen "tube" is filled with ink vs a converter or inner piece?

 

I have 2 Pelican M200's and like the ink fill system. It holds a lot of ink.

The tiny converter in a Lamy Safari which doesn't hold much and I don't trust it leaking. And, the squeeze rubber bulb in a Pilot Metro also seems not to hold much nor seem as long term reliable due to the rubber.

 

Newbie here so my terminology or description is probably not correct. I hope my question is clear.

 

Thanks for your help.

Great forum. Learning a lot.

 

Aloha,

jim



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#2 hari317

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 15:10

You mean a pen that holds ink directly in its barrel.

Parker Vacumatic.
Sheaffer Vac
Pilot 92
Pilot 823
Several Pelikans
Several Montblancs
Sailor Realo
Conid bulk filler
Senator president
Cleo Skribent many models
Twisbi
Several wing sung models
Several Indian pens like camlin 47 etc.
lamy 2000 and many vintage models.
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#3 Chrissy

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 15:13

Pens that have an "integrated ink fill system" built in are generally called "piston fillers."

 

Some that I can think of are Pelikan, Montblanc 146 & 149, Aurora Optima and 88, Omas, Lamy 2000, Stipula. There are others.



#4 Torrilin

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 15:50

Note that an integrated filling system is not immune to leaks. They can actually be more leaky than a cartridge pen, depending on the design. And they can be harder to clean or repair. There’s definitely more moving parts, and moving parts are always at risk of failure.

Wouldn’t get rid of my piston fillers for anything, just fair warning that there’s reasons to use both.

#5 AlohaJim

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 15:58

Note that an integrated filling system is not immune to leaks. They can actually be more leaky than a cartridge pen, depending on the design. And they can be harder to clean or repair. There’s definitely more moving parts, and moving parts are always at risk of failure.

Wouldn’t get rid of my piston fillers for anything, just fair warning that there’s reasons to use both.

 

Thanks. Great info.

Which brands/models are piston fillers?



#6 AlohaJim

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 15:58

You mean a pen that holds ink directly in its barrel.

Parker Vacumatic.
Sheaffer Vac
Pilot 92
Pilot 823
Several Pelikans
Several Montblancs
Sailor Realo
Conid bulk filler
Senator president
Cleo Skribent many models
Twisbi
Several wing sung models
Several Indian pens like camlin 47 etc.
lamy 2000 and many vintage models.

Thanks so much for taking the time to make that list.

Which Pelicans?

jim



#7 Jerome Tarshis

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 16:14

Before the 1960s, when modern cartridge pens were introduced, pretty much *all* fountain pens had integrated filling systems. So that gives you a very large number of pens and manufacturers, does it not?

 

Piston fillers are only one kind of integrated filling system. There are many others. Just look around. Lever fillers aren't all over the place today, but they were all over the place when I was young, and pen people do buy them and restore them today. Esterbrooks were among the most popular American lever fillers, as were many Sheaffers.

 

For an online introduction to the history of fountain pens, with emphasis on American manufacturers, consider having a look at www.richardspens.com. Other Web sites will soon present themselves. With many temptations.



#8 inkstainedruth

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 16:18

Thanks so much for taking the time to make that list.

Which Pelicans?

jim

 

A lot of Pelikan models are piston fillers (the M200, M400, M600, M800 and M1000 lines).  In fact I was hard pressed to know what to do with some Edelstein cartridges because I *didn't* really have any pens which I could use the cartridges in (I've just remedied that this past weekend, picking up an older model Pelikan Pelikano at the Baltimore/Washington Pen Show for cheap. :thumbup: 

Some TWSBI models are piston fillers, and I think some Montblanc pens are (but I don't have any).  And I have a Dollar 717i (Pakistani made brand) which is a piston filler, as well.  

Every type of pen fill system has pros and cons, however.  Much as I love my piston fillers, they can get expensive to repair if something goes wrong.  If you are going to change inks a lot, it might be easier and cheaper in the long run to get some inexpensive c/c pens and converters for them, but you'll have to read up on which brands (such as Parker) take propriety cartridges and converter -- or even which type of converter.  Which I discovered when I picked up a Cross pen in a thrift store last fall -- some Cross pens take push in converters (the way my Cross Solo does), but others (such as that Cross Verve from the thrift store) takes a screw in converter.

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth


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#9 escribo

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 16:34

Yeah, when you go to your favorite pen retailer's website just look for "piston fillers" if it's modern pens you're looking for. Much better system than the old lever fillers of early- to mid-20th century vintage IMO. Generally the ink sac inside the lever fillers held no more ink than a modern cartridge or converter, if that.


I may not have been much help, but I DID bump your thread up to the top.


#10 LizEF

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 16:43

If you go to Goulet Pens' website (they have the best filtering tool, IMO), you will see the following non-cartridge, non-converter options:

  • Double reservoir power filler
  • Eyedropper
  • Piston
  • Power filler
  • Vacuum

There are a lot of pens in those categories (unfortunately, every nib size and color is its own separate entry, so you get multiple of the same model showing up, but you can still see the brands that offer such models and scroll through the pens (or filter by your preferred nib size or whatever)).

 

ETA: Obviously there are more brands (let alone models) with such filling systems than Goulet carries, but it's a start.


Edited by LizEF, 06 March 2018 - 16:43.


#11 AlohaJim

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 17:41

If you go to Goulet Pens' website (they have the best filtering tool, IMO), you will see the following non-cartridge, non-converter options:

  • Double reservoir power filler
  • Eyedropper
  • Piston
  • Power filler
  • Vacuum

There are a lot of pens in those categories (unfortunately, every nib size and color is its own separate entry, so you get multiple of the same model showing up, but you can still see the brands that offer such models and scroll through the pens (or filter by your preferred nib size or whatever)).

 

ETA: Obviously there are more brands (let alone models) with such filling systems than Goulet carries, but it's a start.

 

Will check that out now.

Thanks.

jim



#12 AlohaJim

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 17:41

 

A lot of Pelikan models are piston fillers (the M200, M400, M600, M800 and M1000 lines).  In fact I was hard pressed to know what to do with some Edelstein cartridges because I *didn't* really have any pens which I could use the cartridges in (I've just remedied that this past weekend, picking up an older model Pelikan Pelikano at the Baltimore/Washington Pen Show for cheap. :thumbup: 

Some TWSBI models are piston fillers, and I think some Montblanc pens are (but I don't have any).  And I have a Dollar 717i (Pakistani made brand) which is a piston filler, as well.  

Every type of pen fill system has pros and cons, however.  Much as I love my piston fillers, they can get expensive to repair if something goes wrong.  If you are going to change inks a lot, it might be easier and cheaper in the long run to get some inexpensive c/c pens and converters for them, but you'll have to read up on which brands (such as Parker) take propriety cartridges and converter -- or even which type of converter.  Which I discovered when I picked up a Cross pen in a thrift store last fall -- some Cross pens take push in converters (the way my Cross Solo does), but others (such as that Cross Verve from the thrift store) takes a screw in converter.

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

Great info.

What can go wrong with a Pelican?

jim



#13 Inkling13

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 18:02

Great info.
What can go wrong with a Pelican?
jim

As any other brand that relies on a built in filling mechanism, seals can leak, parts can break, etc. Instead of swapping out a converter, you have to send the pen away for service if you dont have the parts or tools to do it yourself. But keep in mind, Most name brand name pens from Pilot, Pelikan, Sailor, Montblanc, are robust and are unlikely to wear out in your lifetime with normal maintenance, a little bit of lube (depends on the pen whether you use silicone or less likely petroleum jelly) is usually all that is needed.

#14 Torrilin

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 18:39

Im not sure what the failure rates are on a fountain pen really. From what restorers say, most pens fail due to misuse or materials failure, not lack of maintenance. In general, one should not engineer ones product to survive a truck driving over it. You want it to handle normal use and logical problems that show up in normal use.

I treat my pens the same way Id treat paintbrushes or an engine. Keep em clean, and only take it apart if its clearly necessary for cleaning. I havent yet fussed with an ultrasonic cleaner, but I stick to fairly boring inks so far.

Ive also only used modern plastic pens that are easy to clean and take apart. Lamy Safari, Kaweco Sport, the old Sheaffer No Nonsense as a kid, and now my TWSBIs. Clean stuff is less likely to break. Theres some stuff where you can over clean (like a bicycle chain), but mostly if you keep a mechanical thing clean, the process of cleaning it will alert you to issues before they get serious. And its not a good idea to worry about mechanical problems before they happen. You probably wont plan for the right problems until you have a lot of experience.

#15 sail1942

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 16:28

TWSBI pens are piston fill. They can also be totally disassembled by the owner and have a lifetime warranty.



#16 Chrissy

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 16:46

Great info.

What can go wrong with a Pelican?

jim

 

Before you start searching for pens, please note the correct brand is Pelikan








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