Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies






Photo

Lamy 2000 Stainless Steel Review


  • Please log in to reply
18 replies to this topic

#1 smileypen

smileypen

    Near Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPip
  • 43 posts
  • Location:Melbourne, Australia
  • Flag:

Posted 05 March 2018 - 09:57

PzEE8Ow.jpg

 

 

 

 

RATING:

How well does it write?

  • 9/10. I own a Visconti HS. I own a Pelikan M1000. I own a Sailor KOP. In terms of finding that "writing on glass" experience, only the Visconti absolutely dumping ink on the paper has a writing experience nicer than this. This pen GLIDES along the page, and it is an absolute joy to use.

How well is the pen built?

  • 8/10. The pen is extreme well machined, when I received it (and before I beat the hell out of it), it was polished and brushed to perfection, without a single bit of give on the exterior. From the cap to the end piston turning knob, the brushing lined up and it was beautiful. One thing to note however, is the piston is extremely stiff and it often "catches", where I turn the knob and it bounces back 1/4 of a turn.

How nice is the material the pen is made out of?

  • Now this is interesting. In other reviews I've done I've given this a score very easily however this is a bit hard. The best part of this pen arguably is the fact that it is made out of stainless steel. You're buying this pen, because it is made out of stainless steel. But arguable, it's also the worst part of the pen. More about that in the full review below!

How nice is the filling system of the pen?

  • 6/10. Piston filling systems are always nice, but again as above, the piston was not great when it came to me.

Is this pen good value?

  • A great question! And the answer will probably have to be no. In my Visconti HS and Pelikan M1000 review, I discussed how grail pens are rarely good value. But here we have a 'special' non-limited edition of a pen that can be found quite cheaply. You can find Lamy 2000s in makrolon for less than $100 USD. Goulet lists this pen at $319 USD. 
  • If, for whatever reason you decided to buy a fountain pen full retail in Australia (why would you do that I have no clue), a Lamy 2000 makrolon is $349 AUD at Milligram, and this stainless steel version is $449. 
  • This pen is just too expensive for a hunk of stainless steel. I wouldn't consider this 'great value' but honestly not much about this hobby is great value. If you can't imagine buying more than your Varsitys and Metropolitans, then sure, this is not the pen for you. If you have your Lamy 2000 makrolon, your Pilot Custom 823 and your Pilot Vanishing Point and don't understand why people would buy pens that are "bad value" this also isn't the pen for you.

 

GENERAL THOUGHTS ABOUT THE PEN

This is the Lamy 2000 Stainless Steel, a special non-limited edition of the very well known and loved fountain pen. This model here has a Medium 14kt gold nib and comes in brushed stainless steel. Practically everything is the same between the normal Lamy 2000 and this version apart from the fact that it comes in stainless steel instead of makrolon.
 
The filling system used in this pen is a piston fill. The piston is not very smooth honestly, it is very stiff and has a lot of hitches in turning it. Often when emptying the pen the piston will "catch" and turn back 1/4 of a turn if I let go of it. it makes this pen a pain to clean which is a shame because of how well it writes.
 
Talking about how it writes, this pen writes like an absolute dream. Glassy smooth writing experience with almost no feedback. The pen is extremely wet and glides across the page. To note with my Lamy 2000 Stainless Steel and other friends' normal versions, is that often the nibs will 'sing' as you write quickly. This drives some people insane but I love the squeaks that it makes (video here: https://www.instagra.../p/BQ6ZeBcDYKe/ )
There really is only one word to describe my experience with this pen and that is "smooth". It is a joy to just pop off the cap and to begin writing, knowing that the nib is perfectly tuned to write every time it touches a page. It never misses a beat no matter how fast I push the nib and feed. 
There is however no give in the nib at all, I see sometimes people try to find line variation in Lamy 2000s (why that is a good idea escapes me), but this is a hard nib. 
 
Overall, this is a beautiful pen that writes superbly, has a good filling system that can be oiled up I'm sure and is well made. No problems, I can recommend this pen to everyone then right?
Well, there's two problems. There are two big reasons why I find it hard to recommend this pen. Firstly: the normal makrolon Lamy 2000 exists.
You see, this is an expensive pen. I mean yes, Montblanc, Visconti and Sailor make some very expensive pens but really in any way you look at this hobby, this is a really expensive pen. And compared to the almost budget friendly makrolon version, it is almost impossible to say this is a good buy. You can buy this exact same writing experience, the exact same nib and general aesthetic for less than $100 USD on Amazon. Sure you get no warranty if anything goes wrong, but pay a bit more for that if you want it. This pen retails online for more than $300 USD.
With a difference in price like this, just get the normal Lamy 2000. This pen is not THAT much better. In fact - it might even be worse.
 
So what is the second problem? The second problem is that this is a freaking heavy pen. This is a REALLY REALLY heavy pen. Let's pull out some stats.
A Visconti Homo Sapiens Bronze in lava is 46g.
A Pelikan M1000 in green tortoise shell is 32.7g.
A Montblanc 149 in black resin is 29g.
A Delta Dolcevita Oversize weighs around 47g.
 
This pen weighs 54 GRAMSThe cap itself weighs 20 grams.
Easily, this is the heaviest pen I own. And boy is it tiring to write with for more than 30 minutes. 
The final conclusion is: Lamy 2000 nibs are beautiful and smooth, but make sure you buy the makrolon one.
 
PHOTO GALLERY
Xxz4Zuq.jpg

KsfK1HY.jpgnKmrlUJ.jpgnmSoCMq.jpg


Edited by smileypen, 05 March 2018 - 11:18.


Sponsored Content

#2 visvamitra

visvamitra

    Donor Pen

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,441 posts
  • Location:Poland
  • Flag:

Posted 05 March 2018 - 10:44

Cool review. I hunt for this version on ebay. If I'll find it for 130 - 150$ I'll buy it. If no, well, I have macrolon version to enjoy.



#3 praxim

praxim

    On twig

  • FPN Supporter - Rhodium

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,262 posts
  • Location:Not upon the peneplain
  • Flag:

Posted 05 March 2018 - 10:59

Thank you for the review. The fact I agree with most* of it probably does not hurt. :D

 

 

* The filler in my makrolon 2000 had no catch or undue stiffness out of the box.


Anyone owning three or more working pens is in no position to disparage choices by others.

#4 smileypen

smileypen

    Near Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPip
  • 43 posts
  • Location:Melbourne, Australia
  • Flag:

Posted 05 March 2018 - 11:20

Cool review. I hunt for this version on ebay. If I'll find it for 130 - 150$ I'll buy it. If no, well, I have macrolon version to enjoy.

 

I think if this pen was cheaper it'd be an interesting discussion! I think one thing I did not touch on in this review is the fact that I never have to worry about breaking this pen. I've heard about makrolon cracking when being dropped and roughed around, so this might be an interesting EDC type of pen.

 

 

Thank you for the review. The fact I agree with most* of it probably does not hurt. :D

 

 

* The filler in my makrolon 2000 had no catch or undue stiffness out of the box.

 

Great to hear! It's nothing a bit of disassembly and lubrication can't fix but I'm honestly just very lazy haha.


Edited by smileypen, 05 March 2018 - 11:20.


#5 hari317

hari317

    Classic

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,166 posts
  • Location:Mumbai, INDIA
  • Flag:

Posted 05 March 2018 - 11:28

 

 I think one thing I did not touch on in this review is the fact that I never have to worry about breaking this pen. I've heard about makrolon cracking when being dropped and roughed around, so this might be an interesting EDC type of pen.

.

 

The construction of this pen is a SS jacket over the plastic innards. so the innards are now supporting a heavier jacket, so the pen is now more susceptible to breaking at the joints if the pen falls. So take care not to drop it.


In case you wish to write to me, pls use ONLY email by clicking here. I do not check PMs. Thank you.

#6 smileypen

smileypen

    Near Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPip
  • 43 posts
  • Location:Melbourne, Australia
  • Flag:

Posted 05 March 2018 - 11:30

 

The construction of this pen is a SS jacket over the plastic innards. so the innards are now supporting a heavier jacket, so the pen is now more susceptible to breaking at the joints if the pen falls. So take care not to drop it.

 

Oh is that so? That's really interesting, even if the pen is closed up do you think that is the case?



#7 hari317

hari317

    Classic

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,166 posts
  • Location:Mumbai, INDIA
  • Flag:

Posted 05 March 2018 - 11:39

 

Oh is that so? That's really interesting, even if the pen is closed up do you think that is the case?

The innards would have been protected if the design allowed overlap of the jacket portions. But the design is not like that. The piston knob to barrel joint and barrel to section joint areas have no jacket overlap, thus these two interfaces are only as strong as the internal plastic. 


In case you wish to write to me, pls use ONLY email by clicking here. I do not check PMs. Thank you.

#8 Honeybadgers

Honeybadgers

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,551 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 06 March 2018 - 06:06

As cool as the SS is... I think the makrolon version is better balanced and more interesting looking... and half the price.

 

Lamy special editions are usually really, really dumb.



#9 smileypen

smileypen

    Near Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPip
  • 43 posts
  • Location:Melbourne, Australia
  • Flag:

Posted 06 March 2018 - 06:18

As cool as the SS is... I think the makrolon version is better balanced and more interesting looking... and half the price.

 

Lamy special editions are usually really, really dumb.

 

I was pretty disappointed in the Lamy 2000 Black Amber as well! 



#10 farazqamar

farazqamar

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 169 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 06 March 2018 - 10:32

the innards being plastic like Hari mentioned, makes this pen as fragile as the makrolon version.



#11 prashant.tikekar

prashant.tikekar

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 594 posts
  • Location:Pune
  • Flag:

Posted 06 March 2018 - 10:50

the innards being plastic like Hari mentioned, makes this pen as fragile as the makrolon version.

 

Even worse than Makrolon, I have read a thread here reporting steel jacket separating from plastic beneath and falling apart.

 

http://www.fountainp...my +2000 +steel


Edited by prashant.tikekar, 06 March 2018 - 11:00.


#12 smileypen

smileypen

    Near Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPip
  • 43 posts
  • Location:Melbourne, Australia
  • Flag:

Posted 06 March 2018 - 11:06

the innards being plastic like Hari mentioned, makes this pen as fragile as the makrolon version.

 

 

 

Even worse than Makrolon, I have read a thread here reporting steel jacket separating from plastic beneath and falling apart.

 

http://www.fountainp...my +2000 +steel

 

That is so unfortunate! Even more of a reason against buying this pen I guess!



#13 Honeybadgers

Honeybadgers

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,551 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 08 March 2018 - 01:10

I'd say the makrolon version is far from fragile, but it's disappointing to hear they're charging 3 times as much for a simple tube of machined steel worth maybe $1.00 AFTER the machining.



#14 smileypen

smileypen

    Near Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPip
  • 43 posts
  • Location:Melbourne, Australia
  • Flag:

Posted 08 March 2018 - 08:02

I'd say the makrolon version is far from fragile, but it's disappointing to hear they're charging 3 times as much for a simple tube of machined steel worth maybe $1.00 AFTER the machining.

 

Here's a very unpopular opinion I have:

A lot of what Lamy do is not worth it. Their Al-STAR, Studios, LX, Aion, CP1 and Joy all come with a $10 steel nib. Admittedly, the nib is GREAT, but it's still a steel nib that you sell for $10 Lamy!



#15 Honeybadgers

Honeybadgers

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,551 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 09 March 2018 - 03:30

 

Here's a very unpopular opinion I have:

A lot of what Lamy do is not worth it. Their Al-STAR, Studios, LX, Aion, CP1 and Joy all come with a $10 steel nib. Admittedly, the nib is GREAT, but it's still a steel nib that you sell for $10 Lamy!

 

Couldn't agree more. The Z50 nib (and even the new nib on the aion that's interchangable) is just.... not up to modern QC. I like my CP-1 and I really like my 2000's, but they are just not high quality writing tools for the mostpart, they have been stuck in the same design ideas for decades, the only pen that can get away with that is the 2000. Their special editions are either really, really awful (charged green and vibrant pink INKS?! they're unusable, though I did like the charged green al-star, I didn't buy one until I got it for $28 on goulet) or really great and stupidly underproduced (petrol ink was a huge winner) 

 

Lamy needs a new nib design. Two or three, actually. I like the idea of interchangability, but people like bigger, flashier nib designs these days.



#16 smileypen

smileypen

    Near Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPip
  • 43 posts
  • Location:Melbourne, Australia
  • Flag:

Posted 09 March 2018 - 09:59

 

Couldn't agree more. The Z50 nib (and even the new nib on the aion that's interchangable) is just.... not up to modern QC. I like my CP-1 and I really like my 2000's, but they are just not high quality writing tools for the mostpart, they have been stuck in the same design ideas for decades, the only pen that can get away with that is the 2000. Their special editions are either really, really awful (charged green and vibrant pink INKS?! they're unusable, though I did like the charged green al-star, I didn't buy one until I got it for $28 on goulet) or really great and stupidly underproduced (petrol ink was a huge winner) 

 

Lamy needs a new nib design. Two or three, actually. I like the idea of interchangability, but people like bigger, flashier nib designs these days.

 

That's an interesting take on Lamy. I kind of feel that they do some things very well, they make a very stiff, smooth, relatively wet writing nib in the Z50. They make small, stiff, smooth and wet-ish nibs on their Lamy 2000s. But they don't make anything else.

 

Lamy don't make any other 'writing instruments' really apart from those two nibs, and there really isn't anything new to buy. If you have a Safari and a 2000, you're done, you don't need to buy another Lamy again.

 

In a way, Faber Castell have this same problem in that they have their stainless steel nib and their gold nibs (on GvFC), and don't offer any other writing experience apart from the two of these.

 

And sure, for some people the body of the pen means a lot to them but I don't feel I am generally one of those people, and maybe that's why these brands aren't very attractive to me.


Edited by smileypen, 09 March 2018 - 10:00.


#17 prashant.tikekar

prashant.tikekar

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 594 posts
  • Location:Pune
  • Flag:

Posted 09 March 2018 - 10:21

 

That's an interesting take on Lamy. I kind of feel that they do some things very well, they make a very stiff, smooth, relatively wet writing nib in the Z50. They make small, stiff, smooth and wet-ish nibs on their Lamy 2000s. But they don't make anything else.

 

Lamy don't make any other 'writing instruments' really apart from those two nibs, and there really isn't anything new to buy. If you have a Safari and a 2000, you're done, you don't need to buy another Lamy again.

 

In a way, Faber Castell have this same problem in that they have their stainless steel nib and their gold nibs (on GvFC), and don't offer any other writing experience apart from the two of these.

 

And sure, for some people the body of the pen means a lot to them but I don't feel I am generally one of those people, and maybe that's why these brands aren't very attractive to me.

 

Apart from 2000 and steel Z50, there is 14K gold nib too which is a bit different in feeling than steel z50. I own different models like safari, al star, studio, linea, logo which use Z50 steel nib and each model has a different writing experience due to variation in grip, balance and weight. Dialog3 has a very different writing experience due to 14K gold nib and retractable mechanism. So IMHO, there is more from Lamy than safari and 2000 when it comes to writing experience.



#18 smileypen

smileypen

    Near Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPip
  • 43 posts
  • Location:Melbourne, Australia
  • Flag:

Posted 09 March 2018 - 12:38

 

Apart from 2000 and steel Z50, there is 14K gold nib too which is a bit different in feeling than steel z50. I own different models like safari, al star, studio, linea, logo which use Z50 steel nib and each model has a different writing experience due to variation in grip, balance and weight. Dialog3 has a very different writing experience due to 14K gold nib and retractable mechanism. So IMHO, there is more from Lamy than safari and 2000 when it comes to writing experience.

 

Very interesting, completely forgot about their 14kt gold two-tone nibs! I was thinking back about why I wrote them off, and I think it has to do with their pricing. $100 USD for just the nib unit! And I know, Pelikan, Visconti also charge around that much for nib swaps, but that is the price of an entire pen!

For $100 USD you could definitely find an entire Lamy 2k, or a 3776. 

Have you or anyone else had much experience with the Lamy gold nib to give a comment on their performance relative to price?



#19 prashant.tikekar

prashant.tikekar

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 594 posts
  • Location:Pune
  • Flag:

Posted 10 March 2018 - 11:04

 
Very interesting, completely forgot about their 14kt gold two-tone nibs! I was thinking back about why I wrote them off, and I think it has to do with their pricing. $100 USD for just the nib unit! And I know, Pelikan, Visconti also charge around that much for nib swaps, but that is the price of an entire pen!
For $100 USD you could definitely find an entire Lamy 2k, or a 3776. 
Have you or anyone else had much experience with the Lamy gold nib to give a comment on their performance relative to price?


I have not purchased 14k bicolor Lamy nib separately but it is available here in India for about 75 usd. I have Dialog 3 palladium in 14k EF nib and I got it for around 220 usd approx. The nib on it is quite different from steel EF nib. It is bit soft, smooth and write a tad wider. And it is more pleasant to look at it and definitely better to write with.






Sponsored Content




|