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Lamy 2000 Vs. Pelikan M200

lamy 2000 pelikan m200

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#21 Glenn-SC

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 00:02

You would want to write with anything else after using the cursive italic!!

 

Some don't care for and have no desire to use a italic nib (even though we have tried them).

 

For me the M400 is too small and too light to use.

The 2000 is a usable size and weight.  



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#22 GaryUK

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Posted 20 March 2018 - 21:43

I returned my Lamy 2000 as it had so much white in the material I thought it must be defective. The replacement was similar and I realised it was just characteristic of makrolon. Pictures don't seem to get across the shading of the fibreglass material. The main selling point of the pen for me was its largely unchanged design since the 60s. Complete contrast to my Pelikan M205 duo with its neon highlighter ink. I find the M205 a bit small (and plasticky) but it was a good price for a brand such as Pelikan (and it is bright yellow).

 

Gary



#23 Bjeweled

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Posted 26 March 2018 - 22:26

Dont want to throw a wrench in this discussion but I find it really hard to post anything on the fountain pen network... so as long as I have current posts to respond too, Im going to try to post something. Im trying to narrow down my choices I have never purchased a pen for over $130 and Ive decided I just want one. Ive narrowed down my interest to the following: Pelikan m200 m400m600 or a Pilot 823. I own five pilots and they are nice pens but Not dropdead amazing! I own a vintage Pelikan with a gold nib and its nice.Of the 60 pens that I own many are Chinese and quite inexpensive, and they have fine nibs which I do not like. The plastic resin of the Chinese pens is exquisite I follow the advice of Pen Habits Matt, Chrisrap52, Sbrebrown, Goulet and Figboot when purchasing pens. I bought my Deltas and the Chinese pens because of Chris Recommendation. But Ive never spent the kind of money that a few of these reviewers have suggested are exquisite pens. Ive vowed that I will never, ever, spend so much money on a pen that with my arthritis could be a poor idea for me. So with all of that in mind, handicapping condition, not a great deal of money to work with, and hesitancy to put money into writing instrument that exceeds $130, will somebody dive in and tell me what you think of the four pens that I have suggested I will consider purchasing? I realize full well that some of these pens are well over $130 but I just want one. I would like to get a broad or stub in any of the pens that I purchase because I love the line variation. I bought one sailor with a music nib and it is a nice pen. For a while I was flirting with the idea of getting a Waterman 52 or something similar to that lovely pen but after buying a fairly inexpensive vintage with some flex I discovered that I am not able to put the kind of pressure on the nib that I would be required to do in order to get flex from the nib-and frankly at 71 Im not sure I would ever really use a true flexible nib. Moreover, I realize that good flex vintage nibs do not require a lot of pressure and because I like painting with many different mediums, perhaps a flex nib would be an artistic adventure but I can use Parallels or Lamy joys to do Calligraphy. So, we are back to the original question. Please give me some advice. I want one really spectacular pen that will not put me in the poorhouse. A Pelikan m1000, m800 would be more than I would ever spend on a pen...I would rather visit my grandchildren in California. Oh, because of my grandchildren I have been frequenting Goodwill for toys, And ironically found a Brand new Mont Blanc 149 . I bought it ,and because it was a time when I was not collecting pens, gave it to my son. I have not asked for it back but he hasn't used it and keeps it as a shrine but he wont even let me try it because he's afraid to ruin the pen.Pens are to be used and maybe someday he will get that, I certainly wont get it.😅

Edited by Bjeweled, 26 March 2018 - 22:33.


#24 madlag

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Posted 29 March 2018 - 00:38

Like others I like my L2k much more than my m200. So much so I sold the Pelikan.

#25 OCArt

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Posted 29 March 2018 - 04:15

Not to sidetrack this discussion but have you thought of replacing the fine nibs on your Chinese pens with broad ones?  Most Chinese pens are number 5 or 6 nib size and swapping a nib is easy to do.

Of the 60 pens that I own many are Chinese and quite inexpensive, and they have fine nibs which I do not like. The plastic resin of the Chinese pens is exquisite 



#26 IndigoBOB

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Posted 29 March 2018 - 04:49

I got a Lamy2K-F and couldn't stand the sweet spot so I returned it.  I would have faired better with a medium, but I instead sent my Broad Pilot CH92 for a grind down and tune up instead, because I personally don't like the convex shape of the L2K section.

 

But I don't think I'd get an M200 before I ordered another Pilot gold nibbed pen.  I'd save and get an m405, though.



#27 AidenMark

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 04:24

 Im trying to narrow down my choices I have never purchased a pen for over $130 and Ive decided I just want one. Ive narrowed down my interest to the following: Pelikan m200 m400m600 or a Pilot 823. I own five pilots and they are nice pens but Not dropdead amazing! I own a vintage Pelikan with a gold nib and its nice.

 

 

With a budget around $130, from the pens you mention, only the M200 new price would come in below that mark. It's a nice pen but since you already own a vintage Pelikan with a gold nib I don't think you would be impressed. Also the M200 is a small pen, not perfect for less nimble hands.

 

Would you considered buying a used pen? That would bring the M400 in range.

 

Or maybe consider the Lamy2000? It's a classic pen, it's a beautiful writer with a gold nib, it's easy to hold due to it's generous barrel size and, if you look hard on-line you can find them for around $150 or less.


Less is More   - Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

Less is a Bore - Robert Venturi


#28 pajaro

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 18:13

Despite the sweet spot issues often attributed to the Lamy 2000, it is of a wider width than the Pelikan M200.  I have both. 


"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

 

They took the blue from the skies and the pretty girls' eyes and a touch of Old Glory too . . .


#29 iainambler

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Posted 16 April 2018 - 12:53

I have had a Pelikan M200 for just over three years now.  Superb pen.  Mine came with a fine nib, but I wanted to see how the medium ran, so bought one from Cult Pens for a little over £10.  I was expecting a wider flow than I got - but no complaints as for my main writer I don't like it too wide.

Having stumbled over the L2K a couple of weeks back I took advantage of the offer on Cult Pens for a L2K with 30% off.  Went for a medium nib, knowing it would be a wide medium.  I deliberately wanted something wider for a shady ink - was not disappointed with the quality of the L2K in the slightest.

 

Comparing M200 and L2K side by side is, I think, a little unfair - they are different beasts.  However - both are excellent pens IMHO and I have both inked as part of my daily writing arsenal.

 

So I have sitting in my Lamy triple pen case:

Montblanc Classique with a fine nib running Monblanc Royal Blue

Lamy 2000 with medium nib running Montblanc Toffee Brown

Pelikan M200 with medium steel nib running Diamine Poppy Red

 

Also to hand are:

Kaweco Sport with Palm Green cartridge ink

Parker Sonnet with fine steel nib with Quink Permanent Black

 

And for writing surfaces which cannot take fountain pen, a Parker Jotter with medium black Quinkflow refill...

 

Iain



#30 Time-traveller

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Posted 08 June 2018 - 16:18

Comparing M200 and L2K side by side is, I think, a little unfair - they are different beasts.  However - both are excellent pens IMHO and I have both inked as part of my daily writing arsenal.

 

I fully agree. I have both of them too (and an MB Classique, by the way :-) ) and use them with different inks and for different purposes.

 

My M200 EF is quite wet for an EF, and it's one of the rare pens that works excellently with notoriously dry inks like the otherwise beautiful Rohrer & Klingner Scabiosa – so that's a good combination for quick. first drafts of things I write. My L2K EF has a more balanced, moderate flow, good for more or less any not too eccentric ink, and is more comfortable for longer writing sessions.


In current use: Cleo Skribent Classic, Platinum 3776 Century, Diplomat Esteem, Pelikan M200, Waterman Expert


#31 little pen

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Posted 09 June 2018 - 10:17

For $130 there are so many options if your looking for brand new lamy 2000 can sometimes be found Pelikan 200
For me I'd would look 2nd hand.
My top 3
Montblanc 144 or a 200 series
Plelikan 200/400
Or a Parker 51 .

#32 Glenn-SC

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Posted 09 June 2018 - 20:32

My top 3

The OP didn't ask for recommendations for any other pens or brands.

They asked 2000 vs 200.

That's all!



#33 Tseg

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Posted 09 June 2018 - 22:01

I have the M120 Iconic Blue, which is just a vinatge looking M200 with rounded ends, essentially identical size with steel nib.  I also have the Lamy 2000.  Both with Fine nibs.  The Lamy feels much more substantial, higher quality and is a much smoother writer.  The Pelikan cerainly writes well and is durable and has a better ink window, but the section is very thin and the plastic feels very plasticy vs. the Macrolon, which I guess is a love it or hate it feel for many people, but I love it.  My Pelikan Fine is much finer than my Lamy 2000 Fine.  With the above said, the Pelikan is my 'pocket pen' that I can clip onto casual wear and it fits right in.



#34 pajaro

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Posted 10 June 2018 - 03:39

I have several Pelikan M200s, older and more recent, with EF, fine and medium nibs.  I have two Lamy 2000s with EF nibs.  The Lamy 2000 is a pen that feels larger and a bit heavier.  One of the EF nibs writes rather dry like the Pelikan M200 EFs, and the other Lamy 2000 EF is a bit wetter, but not a lot wetter.  The Pelikan feels lighter and a bit easier to handle.  That seems to me to be the major difference.  The Pelikan M200 has a steel nib.  If you put a gold nib in it, and I have done this with some of them, the nib seems about the same in extra fine and some fine nibs, but in some fine and in wider nibs the gold nibs are wetter and slightly broader. 


Edited by pajaro, 10 June 2018 - 03:40.

"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

 

They took the blue from the skies and the pretty girls' eyes and a touch of Old Glory too . . .


#35 AL01

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Posted 10 June 2018 - 03:48

 I won't help...

 

 GET BOTH!

  :P



#36 jmnav

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Posted 10 June 2018 - 12:09

Hm? I tried looking for it but everybody posting about it is already familiar with that model. What's the difference to the M200? Size? Nib? Better material?

 

First of all, all the 2x/4x is the same size (within less than a milimeter variance).

 

400/N/NN vs M400: 400/N/NN come from the 50's 60's.  Barrels are (IMHO) prettier and higher quality as the stripes are there in the raw material composition.  The main difference is the nibs.  The older ones are usually more flexible with more "italic" cuts which are a joy to use (and they use ebonite feeds).  M400, while technically starting by the end of 80's, can be considered "modern", since most units you'll find will probably have less than 10 years (and you can buy them new too).  Nibs are rigid and nib points usually quite "blobby" (and they use a plastic feed); very easy to use by everybody but lacking "personality".  Their barrels are made of transparent plastic with a convering binder that "fakes" the stripes.

 

M400 vs M2x: M400 have gold nibs while M2x use steel nibs (with some exceptions like M250, which was basically an M200 body with an M400 gold nib).  M2x plastic and finishes feel somehow "cheaper" than their Souverän counterparts (Souverän is the common name for all the M4/6/8/1000 series).  Don't be fooled for the "steel nibs" part: some people will tell you that Pelikan's steel nibs are better than their M400 gold nibs (me included).  Of course, being steel, they lack the "bling factor" of the gold ones, but their perfomance is better than their modern M400 gold conterparts, and (again IMHO) even are more beautifully shaped (longer, more "fluid" tines).

 

Then you have the M215 series which is an M2xx (cheaper model, steel nib), only with a bit heavier barrel, which I happen to prefer because of that.

 

Of course there's a lot more that can be said, but those I'd say are the most obvious differences.

 

A big advantage of all these models is that their nib units can be exchanged along all the range.  To me, the best combination of all them would be a 2005 model M215 blue barrel, with a gold nib from a before-1954 400 model, with a close sencond being a first series 400 (1951-54) on tortoise-shell finish.



#37 pajaro

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Posted 11 June 2018 - 00:41

 

First of all, all the 2x/4x is the same size (within less than a milimeter variance).

 

400/N/NN vs M400: 400/N/NN come from the 50's 60's.  Barrels are (IMHO) prettier and higher quality as the stripes are there in the raw material composition.  The main difference is the nibs.  The older ones are usually more flexible with more "italic" cuts which are a joy to use (and they use ebonite feeds).  M400, while technically starting by the end of 80's, can be considered "modern", since most units you'll find will probably have less than 10 years (and you can buy them new too).  Nibs are rigid and nib points usually quite "blobby" (and they use a plastic feed); very easy to use by everybody but lacking "personality".  Their barrels are made of transparent plastic with a convering binder that "fakes" the stripes.

 

M400 vs M2x: M400 have gold nibs while M2x use steel nibs (with some exceptions like M250, which was basically an M200 body with an M400 gold nib).  M2x plastic and finishes feel somehow "cheaper" than their Souverän counterparts (Souverän is the common name for all the M4/6/8/1000 series).  Don't be fooled for the "steel nibs" part: some people will tell you that Pelikan's steel nibs are better than their M400 gold nibs (me included).  Of course, being steel, they lack the "bling factor" of the gold ones, but their perfomance is better than their modern M400 gold conterparts, and (again IMHO) even are more beautifully shaped (longer, more "fluid" tines).

 

Then you have the M215 series which is an M2xx (cheaper model, steel nib), only with a bit heavier barrel, which I happen to prefer because of that.

 

Of course there's a lot more that can be said, but those I'd say are the most obvious differences.

 

A big advantage of all these models is that their nib units can be exchanged along all the range.  To me, the best combination of all them would be a 2005 model M215 blue barrel, with a gold nib from a before-1954 400 model, with a close sencond being a first series 400 (1951-54) on tortoise-shell finish.

 

So, how are they different from the Lamy 2000 in your opinion?


"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

 

They took the blue from the skies and the pretty girls' eyes and a touch of Old Glory too . . .


#38 AL01

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Posted 11 June 2018 - 03:14

 

First of all, all the 2x/4x is the same size (within less than a milimeter variance).

 

400/N/NN vs M400: 400/N/NN come from the 50's 60's.  Barrels are (IMHO) prettier and higher quality as the stripes are there in the raw material composition.  The main difference is the nibs.  The older ones are usually more flexible with more "italic" cuts which are a joy to use (and they use ebonite feeds).  M400, while technically starting by the end of 80's, can be considered "modern", since most units you'll find will probably have less than 10 years (and you can buy them new too).  Nibs are rigid and nib points usually quite "blobby" (and they use a plastic feed); very easy to use by everybody but lacking "personality".  Their barrels are made of transparent plastic with a convering binder that "fakes" the stripes.

 

M400 vs M2x: M400 have gold nibs while M2x use steel nibs (with some exceptions like M250, which was basically an M200 body with an M400 gold nib).  M2x plastic and finishes feel somehow "cheaper" than their Souverän counterparts (Souverän is the common name for all the M4/6/8/1000 series).  Don't be fooled for the "steel nibs" part: some people will tell you that Pelikan's steel nibs are better than their M400 gold nibs (me included).  Of course, being steel, they lack the "bling factor" of the gold ones, but their perfomance is better than their modern M400 gold conterparts, and (again IMHO) even are more beautifully shaped (longer, more "fluid" tines).

 

Then you have the M215 series which is an M2xx (cheaper model, steel nib), only with a bit heavier barrel, which I happen to prefer because of that.

 

Of course there's a lot more that can be said, but those I'd say are the most obvious differences.

 

A big advantage of all these models is that their nib units can be exchanged along all the range.  To me, the best combination of all them would be a 2005 model M215 blue barrel, with a gold nib from a before-1954 400 model, with a close sencond being a first series 400 (1951-54) on tortoise-shell finish.

 

 I would like to chime in here:

 

 Now I am not sure about how much you would wanna spend on the pen....

 

 .... But if you want to spend less than 150$, I'd highly recommend the Pelikan 140.

 

 The 140 is smaller than the 400 - is rounded - and has a nib that's slightly smaller.

 

 ONE important consideration for vintage Pelikans is that those sons-a-guns crack.

 

 I have no intentions in scaring you.....

 

 But if you get your vintage Pelikan from some random seller....

 

 Expect to fork out some $$.

 

 (But I think it's ENTIRELY worth it. 250% assured.)

 

 Oh, and vintage Pelikan nibs kick modern Pelikan nibs in the @$$!

 

 

NOW the Lamy 2000 is a different beast altogether.



#39 pajaro

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Posted 11 June 2018 - 03:49

The trouble with some vintage pens is the some of the plastics are old and they crack. I have had this happen with Montblanc, Pelikan and others. The older Pelikan nibs are often springy or flexy. A lot like this. Good reasons to seek them.

Modern M200 is not like that. Nibs are firm. Some are content with that or prefer it. Generally all these Pelikans are smaller and lighter than a Lamy 2000. L2000 nibs are firm, 14k. Not everyone prefers flex. I suspect it's an acquired taste.

"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

 

They took the blue from the skies and the pretty girls' eyes and a touch of Old Glory too . . .


#40 Tseg

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Posted 11 June 2018 - 11:10

I just verified a Lamy 2000 downside... up until now I have scoffed at those who have critized it being difficult to grasp for long periods because of both design and material.  I love the dry feel of Macrolon combined with sleek design vs. the Pelikan plastic sticky feel and arguably choppy, angular design.   However this morning the Lamy 2000 just slipped from my hands onto my keyboard 6" below, of course landing on the nib.  Sure enough, my first write was totally snaggletooth scratchy.  Using a loop I determined 1 tine was lower than the other by the slightest fraction.  After my adjustment it is back to writing smooth again, although slightly louder, and it seems to be slightly more juicy ink flow.  My pen is no longer a virgin, its gotten its first ding.  Off to use the Pelikan.

 

Edit: on closer inspection I see where the very tip of my tines diverge... they were splayed upon impact.  I have tried the 'over-under' adjustment maneuver to bring the tips together.  Worked like a champ.  This pen now writes as good if not better than day 1... amazingly smooth and quiet.  Back to the storage case with the Pelikan.


Edited by Tseg, 11 June 2018 - 11:45.






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