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Pelikan M200 Vs. Lamy 2000

pelikan pelikan m200 lamy 2000 comparison

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#21 invisuu

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 11:13

 
The comparison between steel and gold nibs always makes me smile. The gold value of an average Pelikan 14k nib is around 8 (or was about three years ago). The Lamy gold nib would be less as it is so much smaller. However the gold value in comparison to the total cost of the pen is tiny, it is how it writes that matters, and the steel nibs are excellent. I have a Lamy 2000 and several M400/200s, the M400 is my favourite pen but the Lamy is pretty good too. Not quite sure I understand your comments about the Pelikan threads?


True, but gold nibbed pens on average cost more than steel ones. Im not too bothered by it either way, just wanted to include that aspect.

The threads, at least on my M400s, dont tighten securely until you torque them so much they grip into the plastic a little bit. This is a problem with all Pelikans, but the mechanical feedback on M20x and M40x is significantly worse than on M80x, for example. Have you tried the thread on Platinum 3776? That is an extremely satisfying feedback, you know exactly when the thread is tightened enough not to give, and it doesnt scratch up your barrel.

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#22 hari317

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 11:21

...Is there anyone who owns both and finds it worthwhile? Is the nib a different enough writing experience to buy it?


I own both (Lamy 2000 and m2xx). The nibs are certainly different enough. Do buy one to experience it.
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#23 hari317

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 11:40

...Have you tried the thread on Platinum 3776? That is an extremely satisfying feedback, you know exactly when the thread is tightened enough not to give, and it doesnt scratch up your barrel.


The problem with designs like the 3776 century cap threading is that the section has to step down in diameter. The shoulder at the bottom of the threads on the barrel (for thd cap) actually acts as end stop for the cap. The threads at the cap lip area makes the cap have poor life over the long run. The century is an inexpensive pen and this latest iteration has been around only a few years.

On the m200, the lip of the inner cap acts as the mechanical end stop. The design has stood the test of time.
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#24 Olya

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 12:16

I can't quite agree in how the Pelikans close and the threads, I find my m2xx pens close as nicely as my Platinum 3776 Century.

 

It is though apples and oranges to compare the Lamy and the Pelikan, even if one has many German nibs thus far.

 

Personally I'd always pick an m2xx over an L2K, simply because the classic design speaks to me more and the ink window is bigger and therefore more practical on Pelikans. On a whole, I am not the greatest fan of Lamy's modernist design, but I also own Lamy pens and they are absolutely great writers.

 

Pelikans are quite different to Lamys, and also whilst TWSBIs have German nibs, that does not mean you've had all the "German nibs experience" or can expect that they feel the same.

 

I think you'd only regret getting a Pelikan if that pen doesn't agree with your hand, but then that's the danger with any new pen (design/ brand).

 

In the same way, if you had 2 of the 3 big Japanese brands (Sailor, Pilot, Platinum), the question of would it be worth buying a pen from the 3rd would be answered just like this one, as all 3 do their nib tipping so differently, that each one is a totally different experience and no one will be able to tell whether you'll like it or not. And personally I love all 3 for their different qualities.

 

Same with Lamy and Pelikan, I love both and both are great writers and it isn't easy to dismiss one whole brand in favour of the other.



#25 invisuu

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 13:06

Theres also the fact that Lamy, Pelikan, Montblanc, Platinum, Sailor, Pilot, and Aurora (am I missing anyone?) make their own nibs in-house. Other brands all just use Jowo or Bock nibs. Imo its worth trying these nibs out at one point or another.

#26 Runnin_Ute

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 20:45

I don't have the Lamy 2000, but do have three Pelikan M200's and the TWSBI Eco (and 580). My Eco sits uninked at present, all three M200's are in constant rotation and the 580 (which has a custom ground nib) is in regular rotation as well. My personal preference runs to the Pelikan's though. (I have OB, F and M in my M200's)

 

My suggestion would be try them all out - whether a pen friend at a pen meeting, a pen show, a brick and mortar store. Then make your decision. We can recommend all day long, but ultimately its your decision. 


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#27 FOUR X FOUR

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 02:18

Lamy 2000

#28 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 13:02

Well back in '66 when it first come out, I didn't like the shape and roughness of the 2000..

It wasn't a Snorkel, King of Pens. :huh:

Well I was an ignorant, arrogant American boy living in Germany...back when the Dollar was Almighty......not that I had any, but the aura was still alive.

I was not impressed by the big fat & clunky MB149, which cost for gold plate more than a rolled gold trimmed Snorkel. :yikes:  The Pelikan was ugly, and cost near as much as a gold plate trimmed Snorkel. :headsmack:

Being rather 'noobie' foolish, thought if the Piston was any good, the American pen companies would have it............. :wacko:.............captive market and expensive cartridges made more sense back when a dividend was a real word. :rolleyes: 

 

.............then decades later, when I did finally look for a good used 2000 on German Ebay, couldn't find any.....so everyone  keeps Gramps old pen. (Will admit it was only a once a year casual search, and am not interested actually. Would have taken a dirt cheap one....just to have one....but spending real worth of a good used pen.....no.

 

The advantage of a 200/400 and even 600 is it will take different nibs....and will take the semi-flex '50-65 nibs.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#29 Matlock

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 17:12

 

.............then decades later, when I did finally look for a good used 2000 on German Ebay, couldn't find any.....so everyone  keeps Gramps old pen. (Will admit it was only a once a year casual search, and am not interested actually. Would have taken a dirt cheap one....just to have one....but spending real worth of a good used pen.....no.

 

The advantage of a 200/400 and even 600 is it will take different nibs....and will take the semi-flex '50-65 nibs.

 

I have a couple of Lamy 2000 pens and they are great, especially the old fine nib one that I got hold of some time ago. But they so very different from any Pelikan and the point you make about nib interchangeability is what keeps me on the 400/M400/M200 path.


Peter


#30 Lam1

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 18:26

It seems to me that the L2000 nibs are also interchangeable, aren't they?

It is very easy to take the nib out of a L2000. Now, if there are any nibs available in the market, I wouldn't know.



#31 Martolod

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 19:03

It seems to me that the L2000 nibs are also interchangeable, aren't they?

It is very easy to take the nib out of a L2000. Now, if there are any nibs available in the market, I wouldn't know.

 

Well, not at all in the same way. The Pelikan nibs just screw in and out. The Lamy 2k needs to be disassembled a bit first, and there are so many little parts that most people (myself included) could easily change the balance or feel of the pen by taking it apart and putting it together. It is by no means a Jinhao or TWSBI which are fun to tinker with.



#32 Lam1

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 19:15

I understand that for the L2000 is not just unscrewing the nib. But, in my opinion, it is really not that difficult - it takes about 30 seconds, tops, without any tool.

And the Pelikan nibs, however easy to remove, can also be misaligned, etc. (and frequently are) if the nib removal process is not done with care.



#33 Matlock

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 20:07

I understand that for the L2000 is not just unscrewing the nib. But, in my opinion, it is really not that difficult - it takes about 30 seconds, tops, without any tool.

And the Pelikan nibs, however easy to remove, can also be misaligned, etc. (and frequently are) if the nib removal process is not done with care.

 

I have changed the nib on my L2000 and it is simple with no tools required. I cannot see how a Pelikan nib could be misaligned as it is simply a screw in unit. I would think the only chance of misaligning the nib is if it has become clogged with ink and someone tried to force it without first soaking the unit to loosen the ink build up. This could twist the nib against the feed. 


Peter


#34 invisuu

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 20:21

You can disassemble a Lamy 2000 in entirety with absolutely no tools needed, except the clip and cap. Pelikan requires a wrench to disassemble the piston assembly, but you can take the cap apart without any tools. They're both so incredibly simple to take apart, that I can't possibly imagine how you can do anything wrong.

 

This is excellent design. I really appreciate that.



#35 Lam1

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 20:38

 

I have changed the nib on my L2000 and it is simple with no tools required. I cannot see how a Pelikan nib could be misaligned as it is simply a screw in unit. I would think the only chance of misaligning the nib is if it has become clogged with ink and someone tried to force it without first soaking the unit to loosen the ink build up. This could twist the nib against the feed. 

 

If you don't pay attention on how you grab the nib, it is actually very easy to misalign a Pelikan nib. I've done this myself and I've had chats with both Chartpak and, more recently, a famous nib grinder in which both report this happening.

 

The nib grinder said that he would accept that I send him just the nibs, but that, and I quote,

 

"Please be very careful when you install the nib back into the pen as many folks accidentally twist tines when screwing the nib unit

into the section(. I) send it off aligned." (correction added)

 

I actually suspect that a good part of the famous "misaligned nibs" from Pelikan happen when sellers have to change the nibs before shipping and, accidentally, cause the problem, since in most cases the person changing the nib does not know much about FPs, nib alignment, etc. 


Edited by Lam1, 06 March 2018 - 20:39.


#36 Calabria

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 00:59

Theres also the fact that Lamy, Pelikan, Montblanc, Platinum, Sailor, Pilot, and Aurora (am I missing anyone?) make their own nibs in-house. Other brands all just use Jowo or Bock nibs. Imo its worth trying these nibs out at one point or another.

That's why I only consider pens from those brands.
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#37 Matlock

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 06:40

 

If you don't pay attention on how you grab the nib, it is actually very easy to misalign a Pelikan nib. I've done this myself and I've had chats with both Chartpak and, more recently, a famous nib grinder in which both report this happening.

 

The nib grinder said that he would accept that I send him just the nibs, but that, and I quote,

 

"Please be very careful when you install the nib back into the pen as many folks accidentally twist tines when screwing the nib unit

into the section(. I) send it off aligned." (correction added)

 

I actually suspect that a good part of the famous "misaligned nibs" from Pelikan happen when sellers have to change the nibs before shipping and, accidentally, cause the problem, since in most cases the person changing the nib does not know much about FPs, nib alignment, etc. 

 

Yes, of course its possible, but you have got to be pretty ham fisted to do it. Having said that, there are some on this forum who seem to want to remove their nibs just about every other day. As far as your last point is concerned, you could well be right and that would explain quite a lot, but I would say that those sellers should not be in the business of trading in pens in that case.


Peter


#38 Matlock

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 06:44

Theres also the fact that Lamy, Pelikan, Montblanc, Platinum, Sailor, Pilot, and Aurora (am I missing anyone?) make their own nibs in-house. Other brands all just use Jowo or Bock nibs. Imo its worth trying these nibs out at one point or another.

 

You could have included Cross who use Sailor for the nibs on their Peerless range and Pelikan for the Townsend. Other nibs would seem to be made in house in China.


Peter


#39 invisuu

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 07:06

That's why I only consider pens from those brands.


Same.

#40 Glenn-SC

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 09:36

I really like the Pelikan design, but only the larger pens (M600 and up) fit my hand.  The 200/400 also feel too light and (IMHO) cheap.

The Pelikans are also available in many more colors and designs, which is a big plus.

 

However, my 2000 writes as well or better than any of my Pelikans, and has both a good (not too light or heavy) weight and shape.

Now, if Lamy would only offer the 2000 in any of the other myriad of colors Makrolon is available in I would be happier.

 

So, IMHO, 2000 or M600/M800.







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