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Pelikan M200 Vs. Lamy 2000

pelikan pelikan m200 lamy 2000 comparison

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#1 Martolod

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 17:50

Hey all, I have been looking at Pelikan pens a lot and the M215,205,200 look so cute but I've got a lot of German nibs, and just realized I already have a German nib piston filler in the Lamy 2000 and TWSBI Eco. Is there anyone who owns both and finds it worthwhile? Is the nib a different enough writing experience to buy it?

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#2 AlexLeGrande

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 18:27

I own two Pelikans, the M200 and the M600, both with fine nibs, and well as a Lamy 2000 with a medium nib.  They write significantly differently.  The Lamy nib has a smaller sweet spot and a similar line to my M600.  The M200 has been ground by Pendleton Brown into a cursive Italic, and writes a much finer line.  If you can afford the purchase, go for it.  You can't have too many pens, although every once in a while, I tell myself to stop buying any more, which auto-suggestion usually vanishes in less than a week.



#3 mana

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 19:03

I much prefer Pelikans over the Lamy 2000. I have a modern Pelikan M200 Blue marble with an M-size steel nib and a Lamy 2000 from the late 60s.

The nib on the Lamy 2000 is kind of weird and awesome, an expressive MK with an amount of springiness/flex, go figure... It behaves very well with Lamy inks. The Pelikan 200 steel nib is... boring.

 

That said, when we go into the shape of the pen and how it feels in hand it is hand over fist the Pelikan. I just prefer that to the more tapering torpedo shape of the 2000. So much that I actually gave one modern 2000 away to a party that appreciated it more.

 

Hence I have only one Lamy 2000 and 15+ vintage Pelikans (mostly post war 100N, one 101N, a 140, a few 400NN, a 500NN etc.), three of which are my daily carry set. Plus that M200.


Edited by mana, 03 March 2018 - 19:04.

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#4 white_lotus

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 19:08

I have a number of Pelikans, several are M200s. They are perhaps my favorite pens. I have a Lamy 2000 and there is nothing wrong with it. But it doesn't fit right in my hand at the section, and so I never use it. I'll have to bring it out of retirement to give it another try, I have a TWSBI piston filler and I never use that either, it's just too heavy for my tastes.



#5 pajaro

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 19:08

It might be fairer to compare the M400 to the Lamy 2000.  With the M200 you could have a couple of extra nibs for the money.  More versatile.  Or a Lamy safari with all its nibs.


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#6 tinta

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 19:09

There is also the shape of the pen's grip to consider.  The M 200 series has a fairly narrow, concave "traditionally shaped" section, while the Lamy 2000 has a modern tapered grip.  You have to be comfortable with grip of your pen. 

I've looked into the Lamy 2000s & love their streamlined design.  Even their textured Makrolon grip did not prevent my fingers from slipping.


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#7 tinta

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 19:10

Hey all, I have been looking at Pelikan pens a lot and the M215,205,200 look so cute but I've got a lot of German nibs, and just realized I already have a German nib piston filler in the Lamy 2000 and TWSBI Eco. Is there anyone who owns both and finds it worthwhile? Is the nib a different enough writing experience to buy it?

:W2FPN:


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#8 Steffi

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 19:38

I have two Pelikan 200s (a M200 and a M205) and a Lamy 2000. To me this is a little like comparing apples to oranges. They are both fruits (fountain pens), but the feeling when I`m holding one of the Pelikan pens in my hand compared to the feeling I get when holding the Lamy cannot be compared somehow. It is just too different for me.



#9 Lam1

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 20:06

I have one L2K and about 10 or more M200 and its variations, which should tell you which one I prefer.

 

The Lamy is a beautiful pen. But, for me, that is the only thing it has going for it. It is an absolute nail and the the section is way to thin and weird for me to hold. I have to use it posted and hold the pen way above the section. As a result, I never use it (when I get to it, I'll sell it).

 

The M200s are very comfortable for me and their nibs are much more interesting. I always have one or 2 in rotation.



#10 OCArt

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 20:32

Just a added consideration on the Pelikan M215, it has a body made of steel rather than the plastic of the M200's and some prefer the slight extra heft in the hand.   



#11 carlos.q

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 20:47

I have both Pelikan M200/205 and Lamy 2k pens and prefer the Pelikan's springy (some say semiflex) steel nibs. I believe the answer to your question is: Yes, the Pelikan offers a different writing experience and is worth buying. Which one you finally prefer is your own personal choice.

#12 Martolod

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 21:15

:W2FPN:

Thank you! ^.^ But I've been studying these boards for months! Owe a lot to FPN! :D



#13 tinta

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 21:20

Thank you! ^.^ But I've been studying these boards for months! Owe a lot to FPN! :D

We are glad to have you here.  A good place to share ideas & learn new things. :rolleyes:


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#14 minddance

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 21:31

I would get Pelikan M200/205/215 though the small and slender section is not to my liking. But Lamy2000 grip is the greater evil.

Why Pelikan? I love the nib. Lamy2000 nibs are no good for me, weirdly (badly) shaped and not round. I had to spend alot of time getting acquaintd with the pen itself and the nib.

For the looks, Lamy2000 certainly is 'unconventional'. But Pelikan M200 series have pretty good looking pens, this is a subjective area.

#15 pajaro

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 21:53

There is some difficulty in gripping a Lamy 2000 to get a nib on the sweet spot.  The wider the nib, the greater would seem to be your chance, though.  If one didn't use other pens, familiarity with the pen would help. 


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#16 minddance

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 22:15

To the OP: I understand this question was posted in a 'Pelikan' forum. You might get other answers in a 'Lamy forum' or elsewhere. But wherever you post your question, my answer would be the same. I would say, try to get your hands on a real pen, Lamy brick and mortar shops should not be difficult to find, I pressume.

Bring your own paper, maybe Rhodia because Lamy test papers are thin and absorbent, you won't feel much of the 'real' nib, everything will appear smooth and inks appear saturated, but you might not write with Lamy papers everyday so bring your own to judge.

And also, pens dipped in ink and pens filled (filled imemdiately or allowed to settle for a while) write extremely differently due to very different amount of ink allowed onto the paper.

(Get that Pelikan)

Edited by minddance, 03 March 2018 - 22:20.


#17 sargetalon

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 01:37

I have tried all of the pens that you mention and I do find enough to distinguish the Pelikans from the others to make them a worth while investment.  The writing experience has a different feel to it.


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#18 invisuu

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 09:54

In my opinion;

Eco - great for the money, mine is a juicy wet writer with super smooth nib. Feels plasticky - in a bad way.

Lamy 2000 - love this pen. My EF and oblique M are both stubby. My F is quite meh, M is a butter smooth writer. Havent tried the other nibs. Do not get the steel / amber version if you care about ergonomy. Feels like a tank.

Pelikan M200 - quite expensive for a steel nib. Depending on your location, you can get a Lamy 2000 with a gold nib for this money. The nibs are well made, but the selection is boring (EF/F/M/B). Feels plasticky. To me, M200/M400s feel like little plasticky toys. Mostly because Pelikan doesnt know how to make a satisfying thread. At least they know how to make a thread, though, unlike Montblanc. I think good Pelikans are M800 and M1000, although there is a good argument here that M200/M400 are better ergonomically.

From this selection, Id definitely go for the Lamy 2000. If piston filler isnt a must, take a look at Platinum 3776 as well, its like $70 on ebay with a solid gold nib. My broad is a very nice stub.

If youre thinking of just adding a bird to your collection, then by all means, a Pelikan is a must have for any fountain pen enthusiast out there.

Edited by invisuu, 04 March 2018 - 09:56.


#19 Matlock

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 10:26

Pelikan M200 - quite expensive for a steel nib. Depending on your location, you can get a Lamy 2000 with a gold nib for this money. The nibs are well made, but the selection is boring (EF/F/M/B). Feels plasticky. To me, M200/M400s feel like little plasticky toys. Mostly because Pelikan doesnt know how to make a satisfying thread. At least they know how to make a thread, though, unlike Montblanc. I think good Pelikans are M800 and M1000, although there is a good argument here that M200/M400 are better ergonomically.
 

 

The comparison between steel and gold nibs always makes me smile. The gold value of an average Pelikan 14k nib is around €8 (or was about three years ago). The Lamy gold nib would be less as it is so much smaller. However the gold value in comparison to the total cost of the pen is tiny, it is how it writes that matters, and the steel nibs are excellent. I have a Lamy 2000 and several M400/200s, the M400 is my favourite pen but the Lamy is pretty good too. Not quite sure I understand your comments about the Pelikan threads?


Edited by Matlock, 04 March 2018 - 10:28.

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#20 max dog

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 10:40

In my opinion;

Eco - great for the money, mine is a juicy wet writer with super smooth nib. Feels plasticky - in a bad way.

Lamy 2000 - love this pen. My EF and oblique M are both stubby. My F is quite meh, M is a butter smooth writer. Havent tried the other nibs. Do not get the steel / amber version if you care about ergonomy. Feels like a tank.

Pelikan M200 - quite expensive for a steel nib. Depending on your location, you can get a Lamy 2000 with a gold nib for this money. The nibs are well made, but the selection is boring (EF/F/M/B). Feels plasticky. To me, M200/M400s feel like little plasticky toys. Mostly because Pelikan doesnt know how to make a satisfying thread. At least they know how to make a thread, though, unlike Montblanc. I think good Pelikans are M800 and M1000, although there is a good argument here that M200/M400 are better ergonomically.

From this selection, Id definitely go for the Lamy 2000. If piston filler isnt a must, take a look at Platinum 3776 as well, its like $70 on ebay with a solid gold nib. My broad is a very nice stub.

If youre thinking of just adding a bird to your collection, then by all means, a Pelikan is a must have for any fountain pen enthusiast out there.

I like the Lamy 2000 a lot.  In it's sweet spot, that 14K nib is smooth, responsive, with a wonderful wet flow that shades so nicely.  I find when I write with my L2K in medium nib at my desk, I don't notice the sweet spot at all.  When I lay on the couch with my journal at my chest or I'm on the train with my journal on my lap with the L2K, I notice that sweet spot, and I have to mind how I hold the L2K to keep it in that sweet spot.  The Pelikan nib is very forgiving, and I can write hanging upside down in a tree and not have to worry about a sweet spot.  My M200 has remained inked almost every day I've had it for the last 8 years or so, but the L2K not as much.  The M200 is a real work horse, with a nicely springy nib, and the ease of swapping out the nib is a real bonus.  I just like it's ergonomics better than the L2K. 

 

To the OP, If you already have the L2K, I'd say try the M200 as well.  No fountain pen experience would be complete with out these 2 great pens.  


Edited by max dog, 04 March 2018 - 10:43.






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