Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies






Photo

Writing Instruments And Single-Use Plastics


  • Please log in to reply
62 replies to this topic

#41 Corona688

Corona688

    Inkfingered Crackpot

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 653 posts
  • Location:Prairies
  • Flag:

Posted 28 February 2018 - 21:56

It ought to be affordable, silver's cheap since the photographic-industry crash.

That link was just the first I found, apparently that same price can get you a foot of raw 2mm wire:

12-gauge silver

12-gauge is "close enough" to 2mm. 2.05mm.

Sponsored Content

#42 amilliron

amilliron

    NOS (New Old Stock)

  • Member - Silver

  • PipPip
  • 21 posts
  • Location:Houston

Posted 28 February 2018 - 22:18

I refill my Uniball gel. I love the Noodlers Kung Te Cheng (sp?), and found that a 0.38 tip size works best with this ink (otherwise lays down too think for my preference) Lasts for a while and write really well! Also, as I'm a lefty, dries very quickly....



#43 EBUCKTHORN

EBUCKTHORN

    Extremely Rare

  • FPN Supporter - Rhodium

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 317 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 01 March 2018 - 03:15

I refill my Uniball gel.

Amilliron-Can you please  identify the specific model? Can you provide some idea of how long is a "a while"?

Thanks.



#44 amilliron

amilliron

    NOS (New Old Stock)

  • Member - Silver

  • PipPip
  • 21 posts
  • Location:Houston

Posted 06 March 2018 - 20:40

Sure! I used a Unibal UMR-83, supposed to have a more 'rounded' nib so that it is smoother as it writes. I put Silicone grease in the end to allow it to flow out of the nib (won't work if a vacuum is created in the refill barrel), but also keep it contained (so it doesn't flow out of the barrel when laid down or shaken). In terms of how long it lasts, seems to last as long as a normal refill, and I can refill it several times, works well for me. I haven't tried other inks, so different inks with different viscosity's may experience different flows.

 

fpn_1520368147__refill.jpg


Edited by amilliron, 06 March 2018 - 20:41.


#45 EBUCKTHORN

EBUCKTHORN

    Extremely Rare

  • FPN Supporter - Rhodium

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 317 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 06 March 2018 - 21:00

Sure! I used a Unibal UMR-83, supposed to have a more 'rounded' nib so that it is smoother as it writes. I put Silicone grease in the end to allow it to flow out of the nib (won't work if a vacuum is created in the refill barrel), but also keep it contained (so it doesn't flow out of the barrel when laid down or shaken). In terms of how long it lasts, seems to last as long as a normal refill, and I can refill it several times, works well for me. I haven't tried other inks, so different inks with different viscosity's may experience different flows.

 

amilliron-Thanks for sharing with the detailed reply. The only thing I don't understand is the seeming contradiction between putting silicone grease in the end of the barrel and the need to avoid a vacuum. Doesn't the grease seal the tube, thereby creating a vacuum? I'm sure I'm being dense here and it's not the fault of what you're trying to explain!

 

fpn_1520368147__refill.jpg



#46 TSherbs

TSherbs

    Donor Pen

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,177 posts

Posted 06 March 2018 - 21:26

The grease is not adherent enough to the inner surface of the tube, so it slides down the tube with the ink. It acts as a barrier against ink spilling out the back or evaporating. 

 

Make sense? It is a movable plug (subject to pressure gradients), not a fixed, immovable cap.



#47 EBUCKTHORN

EBUCKTHORN

    Extremely Rare

  • FPN Supporter - Rhodium

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 317 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 06 March 2018 - 21:53

The grease is not adherent enough to the inner surface of the tube, so it slides down the tube with the ink. It acts as a barrier against ink spilling out the back or evaporating. 

 

Make sense? It is a movable plug (subject to pressure gradients), not a fixed, immovable cap.

 

TSherbs- Thanks for that  prompt contribution. It absolutely makes sense. The same sliding plug appears to be used in new refills. Can anyone suggest additional inks other than Noodler's? I've never become interested in inks and use only standard Watermans (though I have almost all the colors).



#48 amilliron

amilliron

    NOS (New Old Stock)

  • Member - Silver

  • PipPip
  • 21 posts
  • Location:Houston

Posted 06 March 2018 - 23:32

TSherbs nailed it! I was also thinking of using vaseline, but just tried this. Getting it into the tube is a pain, so heating it to liquefy it more may be easier.....



#49 Tasmith

Tasmith

    Uff Da!

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,447 posts
  • Location:Washington, DC metropolitan area
  • Flag:

Posted 07 March 2018 - 15:02

I prefer if they used paper or sugarcane paper for their packaging. I can recycle those but I can't recycle bubble wrap. The local recycler doesn't take it. There are fps out there that are made of bamboo.

 

See if you can donate your bubble wrap to a local small business or thrift shop.



#50 MYU

MYU

    ... The key to it all is Capillary Action! ...

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,547 posts
  • Location:On a cliff, looking at NYC
  • Flag:

Posted 07 March 2018 - 17:45

TSherbs nailed it! I was also thinking of using vaseline, but just tried this. Getting it into the tube is a pain, so heating it to liquefy it more may be easier.....

 

One thing that has me a bit puzzled... when the ink gets low in the tube and you want to refill it, you've got all that grease in the way.  What's your method for clearing the grease out of the way and then refilling?  Do you have to pull the front end (tip/section) off the tube and then run a paper towel through it?  I can't imagine trying to pull the grease back in the other direction until it empties out of the back end.


[MYU's Pen Review Corner]   |   "The Common Ground" -- Jeffrey Small


#51 EBUCKTHORN

EBUCKTHORN

    Extremely Rare

  • FPN Supporter - Rhodium

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 317 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 07 March 2018 - 17:48

MYU -Good question! Thanks. I wondered about that too but didn't want to further demonstrate my ignorance!



#52 amilliron

amilliron

    NOS (New Old Stock)

  • Member - Silver

  • PipPip
  • 21 posts
  • Location:Houston

Posted 07 March 2018 - 20:58

Just a note EBuckthorn: There's nothing wrong with not knowing something! We all start that way, so don't feel shy about questions because that's how we learn, and that's key!

 

For the grease, I use a syringe and do a thorough washing, which does take a while. Using long q-tip helps to get in there, but ultimately when you refill, you do get some initial grease coming through. If you were more specific about that than me, you could do a soap wash to help adhere to the grease and clean it out. Only big issues come with not using higher quality grease, as lower quality grease can have higher concentration of impurities, which could clog the tip easier.

 

Finding a refill like this that works well for me has been a journey. I am a lefty, and no matter what I have tried I have not been able to find a ball point that writes without skipping. I am not and under or over writer (as I think the majority of left handed writers are) I basically write mirror to what righties write like - except I push the nib across the page rather than pull. I think this is what creates the skips, as pens were really designed to be pulled. So, being a lefty, I have to have ink that dries quickly, is smudge-proof, and I prefer waterproof. For me, I found that in Noodlers, but using a fountain pen while fun, has it's own problems. I find that this ink I like dries very quickly in a fountain pen nib, while in this refill seen above I have never had it dry out. Now granted, I haven't left it uncapped for more than about 10 minutes, but if I did that with my fountain pen I would need to restart it.

 

I could go on, but that was the gist of it! Please don't hesitate to ask any more questions!!



#53 TSherbs

TSherbs

    Donor Pen

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,177 posts

Posted 08 March 2018 - 00:16

 

One thing that has me a bit puzzled... when the ink gets low in the tube and you want to refill it, you've got all that grease in the way.  What's your method for clearing the grease out of the way and then refilling?  Do you have to pull the front end (tip/section) off the tube and then run a paper towel through it?  I can't imagine trying to pull the grease back in the other direction until it empties out of the back end.

 

the refill tube of a gel pen? That is what I was talking about. 



#54 EBUCKTHORN

EBUCKTHORN

    Extremely Rare

  • FPN Supporter - Rhodium

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 317 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 08 March 2018 - 03:28

Pipe cleaner, if not too thin? Or,how about the appropriate diameter cotton (or other) clothesline-type rope?



#55 bluebellrose

bluebellrose

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 219 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 01 June 2018 - 08:12

Me too, I try to stick to my (old) fountainpens, ballpoints (Parker jotters) metal with metal fillers and mechanical pencils. That's what we can do as individual, beside we can recycle at Staples (not in Belgium ..). And avoid to accept all those cheap advertising ballpoints.

 

Same watches: I wear mostly my Seiko 5's, mechanical automatic, runs 30 years, doesn't need batteries.

just to update. Bic apparently has partnered with Terracycle in France to do the same thing Papermate is doing with Staples and Terracycle. But it seems they are partnering with schools, universities and companies in France to collect the pens. No idea what do they mean by that. Although they don't seem to be limiting themselves to just a stationery chain but are increasing the coverage by including schools and universities and the vague term companies.

https://www.bicworld...truments-france

 

I guess my answer would be to check with Terracycle to see who recycles pens in your area. T_T No wonder Papermate doesn't care if it's a BIC since BIC is also in partnership with Terracycle.

 

haha, I love how BIC version posters show white out tape  and their famous BIC Crystal and fountain pens while the Canadian one just shows disposable papermate pens and sharpies.


Edited by bluebellrose, 01 June 2018 - 08:36.


#56 bluebellrose

bluebellrose

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 219 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 01 June 2018 - 16:42

Plastics avoid much of the environmental strain placed on natural resources say wood, especially exotic hardwoods. However, most plastics hang around forever, and are produced with all sorts of plasticizers and other additives that we are just finding out thei impact on everything. Two options i do see are either FPs made with near 100% post consumer plastic, or a bio-plastic that can truly degrade in under a lifetime. Nothing yet has reached these, but seeing that Fps are nearly immortal with care, You do get pretty close to reducing your waste stream to a minimum. However we are still guilty of chewing up resources by the sheer number of pens, inks and other accoutrements. So are we really generating less plastics in the long run? We may not throw it out, but its still produced.

welp the preppies before the refresh is made using recycled polycarbonate Not sure about now.  And those cheapie Jinhaos are most likely made of your imported plastic trash.



#57 KellyMcJ

KellyMcJ

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,411 posts
  • Location:Eastern Pennsylvania
  • Flag:

Posted 24 August 2018 - 16:56

Glad to see people are interested. Perhaps I can refine my question: We seem to agree that fountain pens produce the least single-use plastic-if any. If we focus on ball tip (ball points, roller balls) and inks, (ball point, roller ball, gel)  assume the body of the pen is well made and will survive at least several years of use, what types of ink, line widths and types and sizes of refills will yield the least single-use plastic?

 

Some considerations: 1. what types of refills will provide the maximum linear feet of line, 2. what type and brand of refills provides the most line length vs. the amount of material to be discarded when the refill is empty etc. And what about the Parker-type refills that seem to be made primarily of metal?

 

I'm seeking general answers, not anticipating that there are much precise quantitative data available. I realize this may seem trivial but please continue humor me as I ask these questions. Thanks.

 

This is on my mind.... My favorite renewable is my fountain pens, of course. For reasons of sheer practicality (TINY forms, HORRIBLE paper) I've elected for an all metal pen body that uses gel or ballpoint refills for my EDC. The Uniball 0.28mm refills, which are perfect for my needs, are used up in a couple of weeks and I don't even write that much. It's amazing how many of those things I'll go through. (I chose Uniball because of the permanence of the Signo ink.)



#58 Corona688

Corona688

    Inkfingered Crackpot

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 653 posts
  • Location:Prairies
  • Flag:

Posted 24 August 2018 - 18:44

If you get a Uni-Ball Micro, you can refill it with fountain pen ink without throwing away the pen point every time.



#59 KellyMcJ

KellyMcJ

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,411 posts
  • Location:Eastern Pennsylvania
  • Flag:

Posted 25 August 2018 - 00:43

If you get a Uni-Ball Micro, you can refill it with fountain pen ink without throwing away the pen point every time.


The liquid uniball I had, you couldn't (I tried). The "micro" are too broad for me anyway. I'm amazed at what they consider micro lol!

#60 Corona688

Corona688

    Inkfingered Crackpot

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 653 posts
  • Location:Prairies
  • Flag:

Posted 27 August 2018 - 22:37

The liquid uniball I had, you couldn't (I tried). The "micro" are too broad for me anyway. I'm amazed at what they consider micro lol!

 

I haven't bought any lately - haven't needed to - so maybe they got rid of that joint, but if you can grab the very bottom of the pen with pliers and make it rotate, that's the bit which comes off.  Other pens with round bottoms probably don't have it.


Edited by Corona688, 27 August 2018 - 22:38.







Sponsored Content




|