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Fpr Jaipur With Flex Nib - First Impressions


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#1 WJM

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 10:53

FPR Jaipur is the first pen I've bought from the Fountain Pen Revolution. I picked the orange color because it sort of reminded me of Parker Duofold "Big Red" (I mean just the color scheme, the pen itself doesn't seem to be based on Duofold in any other way than following a basic flat-top-ish design). 

It's a resin made piston filler with a quite big, full ink window, similar to the one Pelikan M200. Overall, it seems rather well made and it's comfortable to write with. One thing which can be annoying is that there's a somewhat sharp step between the orange resin and the ink window, but it's only a problem if you hold the pen high. I tend to hold it very low, so it's not really a huge deal for me. The piston operates smoothly, but I had some problems to get it full. On one draw it filled only like a half of the pen's ink capacity, it required pushing the air out and filling it once more. 
 
The pen posts very well, but for longer writing it's more comfortable to write without posting as it gets a bit back heavy. 

I ordered it with a "flex nib". Out of the box it was very scratchy. I polished it with a three grit nail file (which serves me as a budget alternative to micromesh pads) and now it's much better.
 
The "flex" thing is another issue. I didn't really know what to expect, I've never before had a modern, steel flex nib. Line variation is definitely possible, but requires a strong pressure and seems to come from the fact that the nib tines were made overly long, rather than any properties of the material. The slit ends only right under the section. Then again, I didn't have much expectations, so I'm fine with that. After I made it more smooth, it became a very pleasant, wet and springy medium nib. 
 
 
IMG_20180214_095131_HDR.jpg
 
IMG_20180214_095245.jpg
 
IMG_20180214_110626.jpg
 
Compared in size with Kaigelu 316 and Pelikan 400NN

Edited by WJM, 14 February 2018 - 11:02.


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#2 mhguda

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:35

Congratulations on your first FPR buy. They have a nice collection of Indian pens, I hope you like yours enough to try others.

The FPR flex nib is usually fairly flexible, it improves with time (and flexing it) and it does not usually cost too much effort. Maybe yours was pushed too far into the collar? The fact that it was scratchy at first also suggests to me it was slightly misaligned, another consequence of being too far in. Of course I don't know if you're more accustomed to vintage gold nibs, those would be softer and easier to flex.

But most of my FPR flex nibs flex easy enough...


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#3 Honeybadgers

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 20:01

The only one I'll say to avoid with the flex nib is the darjeeling, which uses a plastic feed and just can't keep up. I love that pen, but it's not a flex nib candidate (I have two with flex nibs and they stink, put proper nibs in them and they're awesome)

 

That jaipur uses the #5.5, which should be substantially softer than the #6 flex nib. it's definitely more semiflex, but make sure you don't have the nib pressed in so far that the slit is no longer visible, that will turn the nib into a nail.


Edited by Honeybadgers, 14 February 2018 - 20:02.


#4 Jamerelbe

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 22:22

The only one I'll say to avoid with the flex nib is the darjeeling, which uses a plastic feed and just can't keep up. I love that pen, but it's not a flex nib candidate (I have two with flex nibs and they stink, put proper nibs in them and they're awesome)

 

That jaipur uses the #5.5, which should be substantially softer than the #6 flex nib. it's definitely more semiflex, but make sure you don't have the nib pressed in so far that the slit is no longer visible, that will turn the nib into a nail.

 

Interesting you should say that: I've had the same problem with the Darjeeling and a flex nib.  I wasn't sure whether the problem was the pen or the ink - but I'm now leaning in the direction of the ink.  Interestingly, the Indus and the Triveni both rely on plastic feeds as well - but neither of them have any trouble keeping up with flex writing. [Caveat emptor: I *haven't* yet tried a flex nib in my new Triveni Jr, which takes a #6 nib with plastic feed...]



#5 WJM

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Posted 16 February 2018 - 09:32

The nib was alingned fine, I looked into that before I went polishing it. The flow was very nice and wet, but the nib was just scratchy. Polishing it a bit got rid of the problem.

The end of the slit is visible enough, ends ca. 1 mm above the section (I wrote under in the opening post, we'll, depends on which way you look). And yes, my main reference as far as flex goes are vintage gold nibs (which I don't have so many but I have some) which likely affects my opinion. The Pelikan 400NN showed on the photo in my opening post has a semi flex nib. Far from a "wet noodle", but much softer than the Jaipur nib.

My only real problem with the nib was the scratchiness. The flex, well, I ordered it out of curiosity.

Edited by WJM, 16 February 2018 - 09:49.


#6 simar

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Posted 17 February 2018 - 01:17

Interesting review . Thanks






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