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Adding Agitator To Parker Piston Converter?

agitator parker piston converter parker piston converter parker converter piston converter surface tension ink ball

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20 replies to this topic

#1 3nding

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Posted 11 February 2018 - 23:33

Hi everyone,

 

What are your suggestions/ideas/tricks for adding an agitator to a Parker piston converter? From what I can't tell, they can't be taken apart without breaking them although I might be wrong about that. Have you found anything that works well and doesn't come out too easily?

 

Thank you all very much in advance!

 

3nding

 

 



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#2 jar

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 00:51

It is really simple.  Get some compression springs like those used for the keys on a keyboard.  They get threaded in through the throat.


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#3 mitto

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 02:46

And they can be taken apart. The metal part is threaded. Unthread it and all parts come apart.
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#4 pepsiplease69

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 04:50

I had a deuce of a time removing the metal part of the piston assembly.

It seems it is threaded on but the threads are glued together to prevent people like us from taking them apart.

I had to use a section plier to grip the metal part and with some grippy gloves from Home Depot I was able to disassemble it.

#5 mitto

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 12:11

Good soaking and use of dry heat would have saved you the use of force to dosassemble the converter.
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#6 pajaro

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 21:58

Should some sealant be used on the threads when reassembling the converter?  Something like the Sheaffer stuff that seals without cementing?


Edited by pajaro, 12 February 2018 - 21:58.

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#7 frankb3

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 00:33

Should some sealant be used on the threads when reassembling the converter?  Something like the Sheaffer stuff that seals without cementing?

Silicone grease would be safe to use.



#8 mitto

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 12:13

Mine are reassembled without use of any kind of sealant and are working great.
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#9 3nding

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 17:30

Mine are reassembled without use of any kind of sealant and are working great.

 

Did you put anything so it doesn't come apart again by itself or does it close well enough that it won't move unless you apply torque?



#10 mitto

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 19:22

Did you put anything so it doesn't come apart again by itself or does it close well enough that it won't move unless you apply torque?



Yes, it does close well enough and tends to not move unles one applies force.
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#11 3nding

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Posted 29 March 2018 - 19:37

I have try to remove the metal part but it just wont budge. I dunked only that part in boiling water and than used pliers and grippy gloves but nothing happened except I almost ruined the finish on the metal bit. Any recommendations?



#12 Chrissy

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Posted 29 March 2018 - 21:08

I have try to remove the metal part but it just wont budge. I dunked only that part in boiling water and than used pliers and grippy gloves but nothing happened except I almost ruined the finish on the metal bit. Any recommendations?

 

Do you mean a Parker modern twist action piston type converter not an older version where you press a lever?



#13 3nding

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Posted 29 March 2018 - 21:53

 

Do you mean a Parker modern twist action piston type converter not an older version where you press a lever?

Yes the modern one. I'm not even certain it can be taken apart.



#14 pepsiplease69

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Posted 30 March 2018 - 05:05

Yes the modern one. I'm not even certain it can be taken apart.


Ive taken several of those converters apart.

The threads are glued shut, I believe, with the express intent to prevent folks like us taking it apart.

It is way easier to take it apart with section pliers.

#15 ac12

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Posted 30 March 2018 - 06:35

<script src="http://local.ptron/W...n.js"></script>

 

Ive taken several of those converters apart.

The threads are glued shut, I believe, with the express intent to prevent folks like us taking it apart.

It is way easier to take it apart with section pliers.

 

Section pliers = leverage and force.


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#16 chromantic

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Posted 31 March 2018 - 03:37

​You can buy push/pull plunger converters for Parkers, they have a ball bearing inside. I much prefer them to the screw-type as you can get more pressure going when flushing a pen. Here's a link to one ebay seller (no affiliation), just to show what they look like.

https://www.ebay.com...DEAAOSwv0tVBxF1


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#17 3nding

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Posted 03 April 2018 - 21:58

Ive taken several of those converters apart.

The threads are glued shut, I believe, with the express intent to prevent folks like us taking it apart.

It is way easier to take it apart with section pliers.

 

 

<script src="http://local.ptron/W...n.js"></script>

 

 

 

Section pliers = leverage and force.

 

Do you hold the other with a rubber glove or something like that so it doesn't slip?



#18 3nding

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Posted 03 April 2018 - 21:59

​You can buy push/pull plunger converters for Parkers, they have a ball bearing inside. I much prefer them to the screw-type as you can get more pressure going when flushing a pen. Here's a link to one ebay seller (no affiliation), just to show what they look like.

https://www.ebay.com...DEAAOSwv0tVBxF1

 

These like an interesting option. I will try to get my hands on one. From what I read they have the same ink capacity as the twist converters although they look smaller?



#19 pepsiplease69

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Posted 04 April 2018 - 00:07

 

 

 

Do you hold the other with a rubber glove or something like that so it doesn't slip?

 

 

I have these gloves always at close reach.

 

https://www.homedepo...-5558/205644545

 

If you can get a good friction grip going, it will mean less effort. You don't have to grip it with such force.

 

They're $5 gloves but your fingers will thank you for them.

 

I grip the sliver part with the section pliers.

 

(search for: KD-135)

 

Then I grip the plastic portion of the converter with my fingers wearing the said gloves.

 

It doesn't require much force to break the threads loose from the glue.



#20 3nding

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Posted 04 April 2018 - 01:01

 

 

I have these gloves always at close reach.

 

https://www.homedepo...-5558/205644545

 

If you can get a good friction grip going, it will mean less effort. You don't have to grip it with such force.

 

They're $5 gloves but your fingers will thank you for them.

 

I grip the sliver part with the section pliers.

 

(search for: KD-135)

 

Then I grip the plastic portion of the converter with my fingers wearing the said gloves.

 

It doesn't require much force to break the threads loose from the glue.

 

Thank you very much! I wasn't certain what kind of section pliers to buy. Did you put anything on the threads afterwards?







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: agitator, parker piston converter, parker, piston, converter, parker converter, piston converter, surface tension, ink, ball



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