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Experiments To 're-Blacken' Hard Rubber


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54 replies to this topic

#41 siamackz

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Posted 22 March 2020 - 01:48

Sia, Your posts have been a real inspiration to me, and convinced me to try my hand at pen repair.
My first victim, excuse me, I mean patient is an old Inkograph that I've had in my parts box for a couple of years.
I first used a hair dryer to warm up the section, and it pulled right off. No threads. The sac was dry, and easy to remove.
The lever and j-bar are fine.
Knowing that alcohol is a good solvent for shellac, I soaked and cleaned the section in it until I got the wire loose, again, no  problems. It moves freely now.
Then I tried to restore the hard rubber finish. My photos aren't so good, but the pen was a brownish, greenish mess. I don't know if you can tell from the photos. What I used to clean it is my #1 go to for polishing pens. It's very gentle and didn't bother the engraving. 
You said that you use some kind of chalk  to fill the engraving? Will any old chalk do?
Anyway here are some photos of my work so far. All I need is a sac and that chalk.
Thanks so much!
Doug
 
Stylopen1.JPG
 
Stylo3.JPG
 
Stylopen2.JPG
 
 

Well done! Ill PM you about the chalk so we dont move off topic. So glad you tried restoring this yourself and were successful! Great stuff!

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#42 nono50

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Posted 23 March 2020 - 00:06

Hello,
I put new tests in the discussion thread which I give you the link:
 
 
My mixture has 40 days since its creation and it is still active, as you can see with the Waterman's 52 1 / 2v that I have deoxidized.
 
3 hours and no sanding or polishing except that of the paper towel to dry.


#43 siamackz

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Posted 23 March 2020 - 02:29


Hello,
I put new tests in the discussion thread which I give you the link:
 
http://www.stylo-plu...=292990#p292990
 
My mixture has 40 days since its creation and it is still active, as you can see with the Waterman's 52 1 / 2v that I have deoxidized.
 
3 hours and no sanding or polishing except that of the paper towel to dry.

Very nice! So whats in the mixture?

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#44 nono50

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Posted 23 March 2020 - 09:44

The mixture I'm testing is based on sodium percarbonate. The combination of alcohol, emulsifier, water and cleaning agent with a high proportion of oil (here mineral) .



#45 Conradandhispens

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Posted 16 May 2020 - 06:03

I was just lucky that the imprints were deep and I sanded right over them.  The pen was so bad I felt I had nothing to lose. 

 

It was not just faded and oxidized.  There is/was also a crack in the cap lip, barely seen on the top edge of the top pic, and post repair shown right on top of the 4th picture :)  I have found my own technique for fixing this type of crack on slip type caps only. But that is a different thread that has not happened yet.

 

fpn_1517462942__crack_aa_mhr.jpg

Hi, would you care to share how you repaired this? 



#46 MoriartyR

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Posted 16 May 2020 - 19:25

Nothing can be done to prevent ebonite oxidizing other than keeping the pen in it’s original box, sealed and unopened, permanently. Exposure to moisture and fluorescent lighting will accelerate oxidation, so avoid these as much as possible. There is a nice product called obsidian oil, developed for pipe stems, which you can use periodically on the ebonite to keep it shiny and slow the oxidation - it helps but it does not prevent oxidation.

And nothing can be done to fully repair oxidized ebonite. You can polish the surface and obtain partially satisfactory results, but it will never have the blackness and deep shine that it had originally, and eventually the material will wear away through polishing. The more you attempt to remove the brown/green oxidation, the faster you will wear away the material. If it is badly discoloured it may be better to aim for a shiny brown pen than try to make it black again.

It’s just the nature of the material.

Edited by MoriartyR, 17 May 2020 - 01:30.


#47 nono50

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Posted 16 June 2020 - 20:53

Hello,
My last tests of my mixture after several weeks of storage without special precautions.
 
It is always active and the result is done without damaging the drawings or inscriptions ...
 
Its here:


#48 Honeybadgers

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Posted 16 June 2020 - 21:38

I have a pretty chocolatey waterman 12 full size that I want to use, but the ebonite feels really awful. I ordered some Pensbury manor number 9 solution, but would you guys still recommend I pre-sand it with some high grit micro mesh?

 

After that I need to see if the section can come out (it was put in with some of that tacky sealant, I'm guessing it  was a bit loose) so I can inspect the sac - it flings ink at the merest tap and flows uncontrollably. The nib is an outstanding full flex though, but it's a medium, so it's gonna get sent to Gena for a needlepoint grind.


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#49 siamackz

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Posted 17 June 2020 - 02:41

I have a pretty chocolatey waterman 12 full size that I want to use, but the ebonite feels really awful. I ordered some Pensbury manor number 9 solution, but would you guys still recommend I pre-sand it with some high grit micro mesh?
 
After that I need to see if the section can come out (it was put in with some of that tacky sealant, I'm guessing it  was a bit loose) so I can inspect the sac - it flings ink at the merest tap and flows uncontrollably. The nib is an outstanding full flex though, but it's a medium, so it's gonna get sent to Gena for a needlepoint grind.


Ive always applied without sanding. You want to make sure the pen is clean though - no oils or any dirt. Maybe also gently heat the pen with dry heat before. Just a little. I would take the section out before rather than after this procedure. Finally, I always benefitted from two layers - one at night and then after drying one more the next night. You really want to apply it as evenly and in one go while its still wet otherwise it will be patchy. Plan how you will keep it aside for drying beforehand.
All the best!

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#50 eckiethump

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Posted 17 June 2020 - 15:42

I'll quite happily stand out if I am wrong, the discolouration on hard rubber pens is caused by oxidation of the surface material, like the rust on metal ? To return the material to it's original splendour, various processes will rejuvenate the material ? Working on colouring (UK spelling) or hiding the rust The inherent problem is still there, degradation of the prime material ?


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#51 txomsy

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Posted 17 June 2020 - 20:53

Right. That is so.



#52 Ray-Vigo

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Posted 18 June 2020 - 14:43

 

Hello,
My last tests of my mixture after several weeks of storage without special precautions.
 
It is always active and the result is done without damaging the drawings or inscriptions ...
 
Its here:

 

 

C'est un bon résultat.

 

Est-ce que on doit retirer le levier pour utiliser ce bain (corrosion, rouille, etc.?)?



#53 Estycollector

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Posted 18 June 2020 - 15:33

I've notice the two Dollar Esterbrook pens, 1932, '38 respectively, have darkened by simply being handled.  


"Respect science, respect nature, respect all people (s),"


#54 FredRydr

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Posted 18 June 2020 - 18:23

 

C'est un bon résultat.

 

Est-ce que on doit retirer le levier pour utiliser ce bain (corrosion, rouille, etc.?)?

It's Oxiclean bleach.



#55 Ray-Vigo

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Posted 18 June 2020 - 19:05

I saw the bleach part of it but then he said something about other mix-ins - mineral oil, emulsifier, and some other stuff. I'm curious about this mix and whether it prevent the "pebbling" that you get with a bleach restoration. My experience has been you get these low spots in the pen with an amber-ish color and the texture comes out a little rough. I wonder if the mix-ins somehow prevent that.

 

I'd probably be inclined to mask or remove the metal if it's sitting in bleach. I'd be concerned about rust on steel parts and corrosion on copper or brass ones.








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