Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies






Photo

Esterbrook 528 Nibs


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 funkypeanut

funkypeanut

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 417 posts

Posted 24 January 2018 - 16:24

My father passed away a few months ago, and when I was helping my mother clean out his desk yesterday, I found some Estie 528 nibs still in the original box. I was surprised because he always tried to get me to throw away my FPs. Anyway, does anyone know anything about these? I'm not familiar with Estie dip pens. Thanks!

Sponsored Content

#2 corgicoupe

corgicoupe

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,243 posts
  • Location:East of Atlanta
  • Flag:

Posted 24 January 2018 - 18:12

bfdbdc4c5c2313a6685d093df61c75fc.jpg

 

and this site has more images:

https://www.google.c...lstIydUsXWpXRM:


Baptiste knew how to make a short job long

For love of it. And yet not waste time either.

                                                         Robert Frost


#3 AAAndrew

AAAndrew

    (Not so) Wee Timorous Beastie

  • FPN Supporter - Rhodium

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,406 posts
  • Location:Durham, NC
  • Flag:

Posted 26 January 2018 - 19:33

This is the most complete site (and practically the only site) to learn about the different numbers of Esterbrook dip pens. 

 

http://theesterbrookproject.com 

 

The 528 is the Penesco version of the 128 Extra Fine Elastic

 

Penesco was a slightly budget version of the standard Esterbrook pens. The coating and finish of the pen wasn't quite as good as the standard pen. But it was good enough that the pens Esterbrook made for Ford Motor Cars were Penesco pens. I have a box labeled "Ford Motor Company No. 501 Pen" and the pens are marked

 

Penesco

Ford

Esterbrook

 

The 128 is one of Esterbrook's finer pens for decorative writing. I've never tried a 528 to see what the difference is, but if I had to guess, I'd say it would probably still be quite flexible and sharp, just not quite as sharp and flexible as an older 128. 

 

I'm actually helping Phil, the owner of the site, to update and maintain The Esterbrook Project. We're in the process of migrating it over to a more sustainable platform, which is a not-insignificant project with all of the independent pages and updates we're trying to add. In the new version we will have links to the various vintage Esterbrook catalogs we use as sources, including the 1876, 1879, and 1883 catalogs. 

 

So, any questions you have about the site, or Esterbrook dip nibs, I may be able to help. 

 

Andrew



“When the historians of education do equal and exact justice to all who have contributed toward educational progress, they will devote several pages to those revolutionists who invented steel pens and blackboards.” V.T. Thayer, 1928



Check out my Steel Pen Blog


"No one is exempt from talking nonsense; the mistake is to do it solemnly."

-Montaigne


#4 funkypeanut

funkypeanut

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 417 posts

Posted 31 January 2018 - 15:58

Thanks for the info and links. The box is worn but intact, and if I've counted properly, there are 34 528s in it and 3 815s that all look unused. There was another 815 with an ink stain on it, so I took that one out, cleaned it up and played around with it a bit. Nice flex.



#5 AAAndrew

AAAndrew

    (Not so) Wee Timorous Beastie

  • FPN Supporter - Rhodium

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,406 posts
  • Location:Durham, NC
  • Flag:

Posted 31 January 2018 - 16:11

815's are nice, and not very common. Good find for both types. 

 

And love the Piraro cartoon. Been a fan of his wackiness for years. 



“When the historians of education do equal and exact justice to all who have contributed toward educational progress, they will devote several pages to those revolutionists who invented steel pens and blackboards.” V.T. Thayer, 1928



Check out my Steel Pen Blog


"No one is exempt from talking nonsense; the mistake is to do it solemnly."

-Montaigne







Sponsored Content




|