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Back On The Slippery Slope


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#1 Sesheta

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Posted 12 January 2018 - 20:26

I haven't posted here in a few years although I do pop in to have a look from time to time but I had to share my latest find. My daily writers are 4 SJs. I was a journalist for years reporting the courts and got into Esties for the shorthand nibs. I do Teeline so use the Gregg nibs. I've been on the look out for a 9128, the Pitman nib, for ages so when I saw one come up on what initially looked like a plain black LJ for a very low starting price I bid on it. There was also an Osmiroid 75 in the lot. When they arrived I discovered that the Estie is actually a dark green LJ like a pastel. It's an English one. The Osmiroid also came with a surprise, a steel Osmiroid shorthand nib. The Estie will need a new sac, but I did most of my SJs so I think I remember how. The only thing I'm worried about is getting in. I know the plastic used for the pastels is more fragile. Would this be the same? And if it is how do I get the section off? I only have the Ebay picture for now but I'll take better pics tomorrow. It's a lovely British racing green. Looks lovely with the chrome trim. Apologies for the less than elegant prose. I'm writing this on my phone! I just wanted to tell someone. My husband doesn't get my obsession with Esties. 

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Edited by Sesheta, 12 January 2018 - 20:53.


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#2 inkstainedruth

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Posted 12 January 2018 - 21:56

That blue one is an interesting color.  Is that the Osmiroid?

Back when I was a freshman in college, my first roommate was a sophomore.  She was taking calligraphy and was using some Osmiroid pen (dunno the model, but IIRC, the the pen was white with black trim).  And I thought that the concept of a calligraphy fountain pen was really cool.  But the next year, when I took it, someone else taught the class and we used boring old Speedball C nibs in dip pens.  :( 

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#3 Hobiwan

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Posted 13 January 2018 - 01:06

Nice catch on the British green.  They're hard to find.


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#4 Sesheta

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Posted 13 January 2018 - 12:22

Nice catch on the British green.  They're hard to find.

 

I'm delighted with it. I'm a little worried about removing the section though. I've been heating it with a hairdryer but it's not budging and the plastic feels different to the SJs I have so I'm terrified of cracking the barrel. This is the problem with nice finds. The stakes are so much higher! Any advice would be gratefully received.  :)

 

 

That blue one is an interesting color.  Is that the Osmiroid?

Back when I was a freshman in college, my first roommate was a sophomore.  She was taking calligraphy and was using some Osmiroid pen (dunno the model, but IIRC, the the pen was white with black trim).  And I thought that the concept of a calligraphy fountain pen was really cool.  But the next year, when I took it, someone else taught the class and we used boring old Speedball C nibs in dip pens.  :( 

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

 

Yes, that's the Osmiroid. When I first saw the listing I wasn't expecting much. The nib wasn't shown and it wasn't till they arrived I discovered it was a shorthand nib. Osmiroid were always best known for their calligraphy nibs which also fit Esties. They're usually gold coloured though and I've never seen a steel one. I haven't tested the 9128 that came on the Estie yet but the Osmiroid nib is nicely flexy - lovely shaded lines. 

 

What fascinates me about these pens is the listing described them as an estate find. I've a hunch they were used together as shorthand pens, just as I used to do with my SJs. When you're taking notes for a long period and don't have access to an ink bottle, multiple pens is the only answer. Which got me thinking - I'm assuming that most office-based secretaries would have a bottle of ink in their desk drawer and therefore would only need one pen. So if two pens were used that could mean whoever owned these pens was in the habit of taking notes on the hop, away from the ink supply. I'd love it if these pens had belonged to a fellow journalist but I'm just being fanciful there.  :)

 

I've taken a couple of shots in day light. First the Estie. The lever won't move so I know the sac is ossified. Just need to get that damned section to budge.

 

Ester1.jpg

 

This is the Osmiroid nib. It's a bit scratchy to write with but the line variation is lovely with very little pressure. Like the 9128 it's a Pitman nib which requires line variation. As I said in my original post, I use Teeline which is way simpler!

 

Osmo1.jpg


Edited by Sesheta, 13 January 2018 - 12:50.


#5 AAAndrew

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Posted 13 January 2018 - 18:36

Very cool! 

 

I have much less experience than many of the experts here. what little I have with pastels is that the plastic is a little more fragile and prone to warping. Slow and steady is the name of that game. If you get to the point where you're just too skittish I wouldn't hesitate to send to a professional. They tend to have a good feel for when something is going to go wrong before it does. 

 

Good luck!



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#6 Sesheta

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Posted 13 January 2018 - 19:18

And it's out. I ended up cutting a piece of an old inner tube to grip the section and as soon as I gave it an experimental twisty pull the section came free. Heated it with a travel hairdryer for a few seconds shielding the body from the heat with more inner tyre and out it popped. I'm waiting for some pure talc to arrive so it'll be Monday before I can put it all together and take it for a test drive. :-)
Even better, I was so excited about the miraculous inner tube that I tried it on a 9048 I've had for years that was hopelessly misaligned - and it worked. It probably needs a bit more fine tuning but that's something else to test drive.
Why have I been away from Estie repairs for so long. This is fun!!






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