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Help Identifying Mechanical Pencil Brand/model


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#1 MetalCid

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 18:32

I've had this mechanical pencil for many years, it was a gift from my grandfather who has since passed away. The mechanical pencil is truly my favorite as it's sturdy, comfortable and premium feeling/looking. The body is aluminum and it is branded MΔRBAR on the side and has the Δ right over the clip again. I'm fairly sure that isn't the pencil's brand but rather some promotional thing, but I don¡t rightly know.

I'm attaching a few pictures to help this along. Any help at all will be greatly appreciated!

 

PS: Yes, I just noticed the state of my keyboard in the pictures and I promise I'll clean it today hahaha

 

 

 

Attached Images

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#2 MYU

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 18:53

Wow... and I mean the keyboard!  Your immune system must be in very good shape.  ;)  You should definitely clean it up.  It has been said (quite recently) that laptop keyboards and cellular phones have very high amounts of bacteria, because of how frequently they are touched by unclean human fingers.  If I were you, I'd shut down your computer system, get out some window spray to soak into a paper towel, and get to swabbing up those keys!  You may also want to see about a keyboard protector.

 

Anyway, fascinating pencil you have there.  It looks to have a retractable tip.  Is this a double-push design?  Where the lead portion is extended/retracted like a ballpoint, but when extended a softer push on the plunger advances the lead?  Not many pencil companies employed this design.  PILOT made a number of models in the 70's and 80's with this feature.  "M Δ R B A R..."  It could be a brand that had a short life.  Promotional imprints usually don't appear in that location (most of what I've seen is on the center of the barrel).  This is definitely looks like some kind of drafting pencil, as it is also equipped with a lead type indicator. The old style knurling suggests 1970's.  Was your grandfather from France?


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#3 MetalCid

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 19:06

Hi, MYU! 

 

It is in fact a double push-design as you described, it's part of why I love the pencil, it makes it a very sturdy piece. I love it as EDC. 

As for the branding, I've gone through google to some extent for the past couple of years and I've been completely unable to find anything that hints at such a brand. Maybe someone else is more familiar with it. 

My grandfather was actually from Catalonia, but they moved to France to avoid the dictatorship nonsense and stayed there for many years. 



#4 MYU

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 19:23

Interesting back story, MetalCid.  I wonder if your grandfather bought this pencil in Barcelona or some other city within the Catalonia province of Spain... or if he obtained it once he was living in France.

 

Does the metal tip unscrew to release the internal mechanism?  I wonder if there might be some brand stamping somewhere on that... perhaps some other clue.  It would be great if you could clean the pencil a little (get the dirt out of the section grooves) and then take more detailed photos at some point.

The Japanese call this "double-push" concept as "double-knock".  I guess because that's an analogy to knocking on a door.  Otherwise, "double-click" would be in order.  ;)  I mention Japanese, because they seem to have been early creators of this design (1970's).  As far as I know, no USA companies had this design.  But seeing your ancient example from Europe brings some interesting questions.  Did the maker observe PILOT's design and copy it, or was it the reverse?  :)


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#5 MYU

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 19:25

For your reference, here are 3 pencils with the same double-knock design, all made by PILOT:

 

PILOT_VP_MPs_H-1003_H-2003.jpg


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#6 ParramattaPaul

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 19:51

It is a drafting pencil widely used by draftsmen/women, technical illustrators and engineers in the days before computer aided drafting (CAD).  I have similar ones made by Staedtler-Mars and Faber-Castell amongst the several boxes of drafting instruments I haven't used in 20 years.

 

Drafters and technical illustrators used different leads (H, 2H, HB, etc.) as required (humidity, 'paper tooth', etc.), and different line widths for different purposes (lettering, object lines, hidden lines, etc).  Having the line width and lead type(hardness) on the pencil was a huge plus as you knew instantly what you had in your hand.

 

I suspect your grandfather acquired it in Europe.



#7 MetalCid

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 20:09

I just took it apart to clean some of the grime out of it. I sometimes forget how much I use this and neglect the cleaning. There's some denting/scuffing in the eraser holder, I'm fairly sure that predates my ownership of this pencil. 

As far as I can tell, there are no markings on any of the parts of it. 

Attached Images

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#8 MYU

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 00:27

^ Very nicely details photos!   :thumbup:

Construction looks very solid.  Minimal plastic in the lead expelling mechanism.  It's a real curiosity. I think you can expect it'll last you your lifetime if you care for it.  Leave it to your children as an heirloom accessory.  Be sure to write up the history of this pencil, so anyone can appreciate its history and sentimental value.  : :vbg:


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#9 bobs51

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 04:39

From your close-up photos of the logo, it is clear that the triangle design in the Marbar name is really made of two triangle drafting guides: a 60-60-60 degree, and a 45-45-90 degree model.

 

Clearly a drafting pencil, similar to the others mentioned above, but I cannot help with the brand identification.  It is possible that these were given out by the Marbar Company, who may have been an engineering or design firm, as a gift to customers, prospects, and/or staff.

 

More to think about in any case.








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