Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies






Photo

Returning Enthusiastically To Fountain Pens


  • Please log in to reply
22 replies to this topic

#1 Jimbo1952

Jimbo1952

    NOS (New Old Stock)

  • Member - Silver

  • PipPip
  • 14 posts
  • Location:Indianapolis, Indiana
  • Flag:

Posted 01 January 2018 - 17:47

I recall fondly using the Sheaffer Student Cartridge fountain pen throughout high school in the 1960s.  I had several at a time—a red and a blue and a green transparent barrel with the silver metallic cap.  I think I may also have had a clear barrel.  My favorite was the red.  I suspect they all had a medium nib—I don’t remember if other alternative nibs were offered.  I used the washable blue ink—they came in packages of five cartridges and were large enough each to contain a decent amount of ink.  I remember the satisfying sense as I screwed down the nib section into the barrel as the cartridge was pierced.  These were certainly durable pens and very reliable.  It seems like the pen only cost a dollar or so and you could get two five-packs of cartridges for around fifty cents.

 

I stopped using fountain pens in college.  Afterwards, I had a desk set with both a ballpoint and fountain pen, but I routinely relied less and less on the fountain pen.  It’s difficult to say why I got away from using a fountain pen altogether for nearly 40 years.  In the last several years, the simple uni-ball vision needle roller ball has been my go-to pen, even though I have many, many other pens from which to choose.

 

I gave my father a Montblanc 146 Bordeaux fountain pen more than 25 years ago.  (He had been a fountain pen user also--Parker and Sheaffer but no Montblanc.)  I had his initials engraved on the clip—small and tastefully done.  I also included a bottle of Mont Blanc black ink (52 ml bottle apparently back then).  He used the pen a few times (perhaps only briefly) before he passed away a year or so after my gift.  Sometime later, my mother gave the pen to me (with the box and warranty papers) along with the ink (still in the box that says it is with "Supercleaner SC 21" and with the price tag of $5.95).

 

I pulled the MB pen out a few months ago having not used it—it is still in mint condition.  The ink appeared to be in perfect condition as well with no evaporation.  I excitedly (and a little nervously) filled the pen with ink.  As I started using the pen, the memories came flooding back—the nostalgia and my affection for the fountain pen in high school and, significantly, the memories of my father.  More notably, I also re-discovered the true enjoyment of using the fountain pen.

 

I was in a meeting a couple of weeks ago when I pulled out the Montblanc pen to use it, and as I unscrewed the cap, several people immediately remarked on the pen.  While the pen is indeed beautiful, I think it was the mere action of unscrewing the cap that probably caught their attention and elicited their reaction.

 

My primary attraction to the fountain pen includes all the things everyone here obviously already understand and appreciate.  I must admit that the favorable comments from the others in that meeting a few weeks ago also got me more interested and excited about using a fountain pen exclusively.

 

I proceeded to look up information about my Montblanc pen.  That naturally led me to discovering the whole world of fountain pens on the internet.  It seems as though I’ve fallen down a rabbit hole as I’ve watched numerous videos and have enjoyed hours of reading posts on this site.  I have no doubt my recent journey or re-discovery or conversion or epiphany—you pick the word—is similar to many (most) on this forum.

 

I am now making lists of fountain pens--principally vintage fountain pens but also a few modern or current pens--that I want to own or try out.  And certainly different inks.  (And paper as well as various accessories!)

 

I am excited to now be a part of this forum--and all of the helpful advice that is here--as I enthusiastically return to the world of fountain pens!

 

Jimbo

 

(Indianapolis, Indiana)



Sponsored Content

#2 OCArt

OCArt

    OBB

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,409 posts
  • Location:San Diego
  • Flag:

Posted 01 January 2018 - 18:17

What a nice introduction.  I had the same Sheaffer school pens from the same vintage.  Probably purchased at the drug store that had a soda fountain and a pharmacist surrounded by large bottle of colorful fluids.  Welcome to our little corner of the universe from a pen user in San Diego. 



#3 pen2paper

pen2paper

    arty o the irst art

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,729 posts

Posted 01 January 2018 - 18:18

A warm welcome!

Enjoyed all of your pen memories.  

 

You might want to see where the nearest pen meets are held, since that offers a relaxed opportunity to discuss & test drive pens, inks, papers, after which you're primed with hands on info + central  location that makes both the Chicago & Ohio pen shows worth your time. 



emoticon-animal-007.gif~Hi! fountain pen enthusiast here~


#4 Herrjaeger

Herrjaeger

    Herrjaeger

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,177 posts
  • Location:Charleston, SC
  • Flag:

Posted 01 January 2018 - 18:24

Welcome aboard, Jimbo, from Charleston, SC. Your enthusiam since rediscovering your Dad’s pen is refreshing. Good luck, and have fun.
Mike

#5 Rosendust2121

Rosendust2121

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 102 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 01 January 2018 - 19:23

Welcome, and what a heartwarming story to hear. Hope you enjoy your time here and welcome aboard!  :W2FPN: 


Many boys will bring you flowers. But someday you'll meet a boy who will learn your favourite  flower, your favourite song, your favourite sweet. And even if he is too poor to give you any of them, it won't matter because he will have taken the time to know you as no one else does. Only that boy earns your heart.”  

Leigh Bardugo

 

Regards,

Rosendust

 


#6 MalcolmH

MalcolmH

    Donor Pen

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,027 posts
  • Location:England
  • Flag:

Posted 01 January 2018 - 19:36

Hello Jimbo...welcome back.

 

:)



#7 jar

jar

    A Vintage Pen has to be older than me.

  • Premium - Ruby

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,987 posts
  • Location:From Deep South Texas
  • Flag:

Posted 01 January 2018 - 19:41

 Welcome home. Pull up a stump and set a spell. There were three versions of that school pan, the first had rounded ends, the second conical ends and the third flat ends.  The nibs were fine medium and broad either with a single letter initially or later three numbers 30x with the x the width.


My Sister's website :  Rose Hill Studios

My Website


#8 PAKMAN

PAKMAN

    Say that again, I have a pen here somewhere...

  • FPN Super Moderators

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,202 posts
  • Location:Arkansas, USA
  • Flag:

Posted 01 January 2018 - 21:53

Hello and Welcome to FPN!! Glad to have you as a member!!


PAKMAN
 

minibanner.gif             fpn_1321906507__vanness_sign.jpg 

                  My Favorite Pen Restorer                            My favorite Brick and Mortar              

                                                                   now selling online!


#9 Chrissy

Chrissy

    Ancient Artifact

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,320 posts
  • Location:England
  • Flag:

Posted 01 January 2018 - 21:58

Hello and welcome to FPN.  :W2FPN:


flying-letter-exc.png


#10 tbickiii

tbickiii

    tbickiii

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,465 posts
  • Location:Baton Rouge, LA
  • Flag:

Posted 02 January 2018 - 00:19

Hello and welcome from Baton Rouge, Louisiana...Enjoy your time here


Thomas
Baton Rouge, LA
(tbickiii)

Check out my ebay pen listings
:
  tbickiii's Vintage Fountain Pens


#11 Kelly G

Kelly G

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,413 posts
  • Location:S.W. Kansas

Posted 02 January 2018 - 02:54

Welcome back to the obsession Jimbo. I’m of a similar vintage and used the Sheaffer pens in Jr. high school. I got back into fp’s in the ‘90’s when my wife gifted me a MB 144. It has been down the slippery slope ever since, but a fun ride. Enjoy your pens!
May we live, not by our fears but by our hopes; not by our words but by our deeds; not by our disappointments but by our dreams.

#12 sodul

sodul

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 249 posts
  • Location:Sunnyvale, CA
  • Flag:

Posted 02 January 2018 - 04:31

Welcome back Jimbo, I went back to fountain pens almost 2 years ago. I'm now slowly collecting new cheap chinese pens but also vintage fixer uppers  that I restore to writing conditions and use at work. As my collection grow so does my equipment around it (buffing pads, jewelry tools, pen boxes, shellac, etc...). I've found out that a lot of vintage, mostly pre-1960s, pens can be had for much less than a modern pen of lesser writing quality. My main problem is that I have big hands and love oversize pens, these can be pricey.



#13 welch

welch

    Donor Pen

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,678 posts
  • Location:New York, NY
  • Flag:

Posted 02 January 2018 - 04:57

I recall fondly using the Sheaffer Student Cartridge fountain pen throughout high school in the 1960s.  I had several at a time—a red and a blue and a green transparent barrel with the silver metallic cap.  I think I may also have had a clear barrel.  My favorite was the red.  I suspect they all had a medium nib—I don’t remember if other alternative nibs were offered.  I used the washable blue ink—they came in packages of five cartridges and were large enough each to contain a decent amount of ink.  I remember the satisfying sense as I screwed down the nib section into the barrel as the cartridge was pierced.  These were certainly durable pens and very reliable.  It seems like the pen only cost a dollar or so and you could get two five-packs of cartridges for around fifty cents.

 

I stopped using fountain pens in college.  Afterwards, I had a desk set with both a ballpoint and fountain pen, but I routinely relied less and less on the fountain pen.  It’s difficult to say why I got away from using a fountain pen altogether for nearly 40 years.  In the last several years, the simple uni-ball vision needle roller ball has been my go-to pen, even though I have many, many other pens from which to choose.

 

I gave my father a Montblanc 146 Bordeaux fountain pen more than 25 years ago.  (He had been a fountain pen user also--Parker and Sheaffer but no Montblanc.)  I had his initials engraved on the clip—small and tastefully done.  I also included a bottle of Mont Blanc black ink (52 ml bottle apparently back then).  He used the pen a few times (perhaps only briefly) before he passed away a year or so after my gift.  Sometime later, my mother gave the pen to me (with the box and warranty papers) along with the ink (still in the box that says it is with "Supercleaner SC 21" and with the price tag of $5.95).

 

I pulled the MB pen out a few months ago having not used it—it is still in mint condition.  The ink appeared to be in perfect condition as well with no evaporation.  I excitedly (and a little nervously) filled the pen with ink.  As I started using the pen, the memories came flooding back—the nostalgia and my affection for the fountain pen in high school and, significantly, the memories of my father.  More notably, I also re-discovered the true enjoyment of using the fountain pen.

 

I was in a meeting a couple of weeks ago when I pulled out the Montblanc pen to use it, and as I unscrewed the cap, several people immediately remarked on the pen.  While the pen is indeed beautiful, I think it was the mere action of unscrewing the cap that probably caught their attention and elicited their reaction.

 

My primary attraction to the fountain pen includes all the things everyone here obviously already understand and appreciate.  I must admit that the favorable comments from the others in that meeting a few weeks ago also got me more interested and excited about using a fountain pen exclusively.

 

I proceeded to look up information about my Montblanc pen.  That naturally led me to discovering the whole world of fountain pens on the internet.  It seems as though I’ve fallen down a rabbit hole as I’ve watched numerous videos and have enjoyed hours of reading posts on this site.  I have no doubt my recent journey or re-discovery or conversion or epiphany—you pick the word—is similar to many (most) on this forum.

 

I am now making lists of fountain pens--principally vintage fountain pens but also a few modern or current pens--that I want to own or try out.  And certainly different inks.  (And paper as well as various accessories!)

 

I am excited to now be a part of this forum--and all of the helpful advice that is here--as I enthusiastically return to the world of fountain pens!

 

Jimbo

 

(Indianapolis, Indiana)

 

Welcome! My first "ink pen" was a Sheaffer school pen, late '50s. In 1960, my parents gave me a Parker 45, which I used until I was in college, filling with Sheaffer Washable Black and Washable Blue-Black. When I got back into fountain pens a decade ago, I assembled a 45 just like my old pen: dark blue barrel and grip, gold nib, early-60's style converter. ou can do the same, although many seller's on EBay think that a Sheaffer school pen, being old, is now worth $25 or $50!

 

A few years ago, I got my father a Parker Vacumatic to replace one I smashed when I was about two. Mom had saved and given it to him when his unit was sent to a carrier in the Pacifi in 1943. He had tears, and so did I. Enjoy using your dad's MontBlanc.

 

For a great vintage pen, look for a Parker 51, "the world's most wanted pen" (Parker advertising slogan) from the early '40s until people shifted away from fountain pens in the early '60s. No glitz, just great design in every feature: slip-off cap, so you can begin writing as soon as it's out of your pocket. Ink "collector" encircling the feed and nib so it will lay down a line the moment it touches paper. Tough plastic that endures anything except a pounding with a sledge-hammer.


Don't take any job that requires new clothes.

#14 Bisquitlips

Bisquitlips

    Bisquitlips

  • FPN Supporter - Platinum

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,414 posts
  • Location:Everywhere I go...there I am!
  • Flag:

Posted 02 January 2018 - 07:51

Welcome!  Glad you are with us!

Plan purposefully, prepare prayerfully, proceed positively, pursue persistently.
W.Ward

 

 

 
 

#15 mitto

mitto

    Museum Piece

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,989 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 02 January 2018 - 10:35

Greetings and welcome to FPN.
Khan

#16 Cormite

Cormite

    Near Mint

  • Member - Bronze+

  • PipPipPip
  • 39 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 02 January 2018 - 10:40

Dear Jimbo1952,

 

That's what I call a great introduction! I am so new to this forum (since yesterday) that I almost feel embarrased to say welcome. I am still receiving my own welcome messages.

I hope you enjoy the comeback.

 

Have a wonderfl day.

Carlos.



#17 Wahl

Wahl

    Museum Piece

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,330 posts
  • Location:Spain
  • Flag:

Posted 02 January 2018 - 12:55

Hi Jimbo     :W2FPN:



#18 Sasha Royale

Sasha Royale

    Ancient Artifact

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,399 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 03 January 2018 - 15:28

Welcome, Jimbo !  

 

I am from the same period.  In 1961, I was a seventh grader, discovering a "school book store", in public school.  I used the same Sheaffers, in the same colors as you used.  My first was  green, on a blister card, with two ink cartridges.  The total price was 79¢  (no sales tax on 99¢ or less) .  I carried it in a plastic, zipper pouch, inside my three-ring notebook.  Of course, i CRUSHED it.  The replacement had a fine nib.  In the subsequent decade, I crushed a half dozen more Sheaffers, followed by a similar number of Parker 45's.   I have carried a Parker 45 fountain pen since.  

 

Today, my collection includes several Sheaffer school pens, in the three designs.  Surprising that so many survived fifty years, in great condition.  The medium nibs are scarcer, now.  Of course, the cartridges can be refilled with bottle ink, using a syringe.  Personally, I use a "short"  International Standard cartridge.  I pierce the flat end, using a "push" pin, followed by a small nail, to provide a pilot hole, that fits tightly on the Sheaffer punch.  

 

Those were tough years for an immigrant kid, who didn't look like the other kids.  However, life was uncomplicated.  I miss it.  Thanks for taking me back for a visit.  


Edited by Sasha Royale, 03 January 2018 - 15:30.

Auf freiem Grund mit freiem Volke stehn. 
Zum Augenblicke dürft ich sagen: 
Verweile doch, du bist so schön ! 


#19 Jimbo1952

Jimbo1952

    NOS (New Old Stock)

  • Member - Silver

  • PipPip
  • 14 posts
  • Location:Indianapolis, Indiana
  • Flag:

Posted 03 January 2018 - 15:52

What a nice welcome from everyone!  It is fun to be part of the Forum and, in time, I hope I am able to contribute.  At this point, though, I have only questions and no answers?!

 

It is interesting to find others who also wrote with the Sheaffer Student/School cartridge pen in and around the 1960s with, hopefully, equally fond memories.

 

 



#20 Jimbo1952

Jimbo1952

    NOS (New Old Stock)

  • Member - Silver

  • PipPip
  • 14 posts
  • Location:Indianapolis, Indiana
  • Flag:

Posted 03 January 2018 - 16:58

What a nice introduction.  I had the same Sheaffer school pens from the same vintage.  Probably purchased at the drug store that had a soda fountain and a pharmacist surrounded by large bottle of colorful fluids.

 

Well, as a matter of fact, I worked at that corner drug store with the soda fountain my junior and senior year in high school! I worked behind the sales counter with a large NCR cash register (years before UPC bar codes) and also worked with the pharmacist typing prescription labels on an small typewriter (manual at first and then went to electric).  Earned $1.00 an hour (21 hours a week).  The soda fountain had the BEST milk shakes and malts and banana splits.  Whatever became of cherry phosphates that I used to get there? 

 

While I may have bought some of my Sheaffer school pens and cartridge ink at the corner drug store, I recall buying most of them at the Five and Dime Variety Store on the opposite side of the courthouse square. 








Sponsored Content




|