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Typewriters ... Any Interest?


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#21 Dickkooty2

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Posted 25 February 2018 - 20:45

What a nice a Lettera 22 with a family history!

 

I hope you have the case in tact. If you do, please notice that the lining may be surprising:

fpn_1519591480__screen_shot_2018-02-25_a

 

In the 60s, Olivetti produced its machines at a facility in Glasgow.

 

My case has suffered from zipper separation.  I would like to find another, but as the writer says " ‘has about as much chance as a one-armed blind man in a dark room trying to shove a pound of melted butter into a wild-cat’s ear with a red-hot needle.’.



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#22 shamwari

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Posted 26 February 2018 - 22:01

Wow, I like the inside of that case! 

 

I had forgotten that there was an Olivetti factory in Glasgow.  I came to Scotland in 1978 and looking at the web I see that the factory was still going then, having been opened in 1949.  It was sold to Smith Corona in 1981 to make daisywheel typewriters, closed in 1983 and was demolished in 1989.

 

My case lining is very sober compared to yours, as can be seen in the pic below.

 

Lettera#2.JPG


"If you want to succeed in the world, you don't have to be much cleverer than other people. You just have to be one day earlier." -- Leo Szilard


#23 shamwari

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Posted 26 February 2018 - 22:04

I also have the original plastic dust cover but it is now getting a bit hard with age and also seems to have shrunk slightly.  I wonder if I can get some plastic restorer for it?

 

Lettera#1.JPG


"If you want to succeed in the world, you don't have to be much cleverer than other people. You just have to be one day earlier." -- Leo Szilard


#24 Dickkooty2

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 00:11

Thanks for the follow-up on the fate of the SCM nee Olivetti factory. It is miraculous that a typewriter made in Glasgow and purchased many years ago second-hand in Rhodesia should return to the west coast of Scotland.

 

My case is not the glorious tartan of the Glasgow-produced, but rather the tan-lined case of the made-in-Italy model.

 

fpn_1519690413__fpn_1513301699__screen_sSince this picture was taken, two snap restraining flaps similar to the factory top strap have been installed.

 

As the NYT used to say "in separate but related stories ..."

 

 

 

 

http://www.fountainp...-81-34/?p=39669

 

http://www.fountainp...1-34/?p=3980923



#25 Retro-user

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 07:20

For those who favor typewriters, what is the ideal desk height in terms of ergonomics? I always use for a computer keyboard a pull-out shelf, but the angled keyboard of a typewriter is a different animal. I see the old metal typewriter tables were mostly 26 inches in height, or thereabouts. What arrangements work best with modern furniture?

Edited by Retro-user, 27 February 2018 - 07:21.


#26 Inky_paws

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 11:09

For those who favor typewriters, what is the ideal desk height in terms of ergonomics? I always use for a computer keyboard a pull-out shelf, but the angled keyboard of a typewriter is a different animal. I see the old metal typewriter tables were mostly 26 inches in height, or thereabouts. What arrangements work best with modern furniture?

 

Let's not get into ergonomics. I've been 'advised' by the 'experts' a number of times over the years and every one of them has caused injuries to me. Fiddle and find what's comfortable for you methinks.



#27 shamwari

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 22:56

Thanks Dick, it's a testament to the manufacturing quality of that era that my Lettera is still fully functional despite being out to Africa and back and suffering my ham-fistedness as a kid and all with minimal maintenance.

I enjoyed looking at you other thread, I wish I could draw like you, there are some wonderful drawings. It's a pity some have been lost to Photobucket's greed. I hadn't realised that the dogs in the background of the Groma Kalinri picture in this thread were your work either. You have a good eye.

"If you want to succeed in the world, you don't have to be much cleverer than other people. You just have to be one day earlier." -- Leo Szilard


#28 Dickkooty2

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Posted 12 March 2018 - 00:19

A minimalist movie poster for The Post

fpn_1520813920__post_typewriter.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.dezeen.c...ters-chungkong/



#29 Dickkooty2

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Posted 15 March 2018 - 04:51

A winter break class and writing on a typewriter ...

 

http://ephblog.com/2018/01/28/a-sunday-break-winter-study-on-typewriters/

 

fpn_1521089884__emma.jpg

 

with a follow-up story ...

 

https://magazine.wil...g-how-to-write/



#30 Janeiac

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 21:44

I am accumulating mid-century portables whose design I like or that have an external history.
 
I can't seem to find a low-profile US-made and marketed portable. I have the Royal Safari but it loses by comparison with the others in my list (below), even the Olivetti Valentine. From my design POV at any rate.
 
I welcome suggestions for other models I should have, particularly the US. Typewriter design in the US seems to me to follow auto design of that time: bigger is better for the US buyer.

 <snip>

 
I look forward to amy questions and/or suggestions.
 
Dick
 <snip>


What about a Smith Corona Skyriter? It was meant to be able to be used on an airplane and is sized like a laptop. http://typewriterdat...ml0ZXI=.86.bmys

#31 escribo

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 22:46

Dick,

 

What's the story behind the swap of the z and y keys on the typewriter in post #17?


I may not have been much help, but I DID bump your thread up to the top.


#32 Dickkooty2

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Posted 20 March 2018 - 02:20

Dick,

 

What's the story behind the swap of the z and y keys on the typewriter in post #17?

The US/English keyboard is  'qwerty'. Other languages may use 'qwertz' to allow for additional umlauts, accents, and special language symbols.

 

Actually, there are an amazing number of other keyboards in a great number of unexpected languages.

 

Here is the keyboard entry for your amusement ...

 

https://en.wikipedia...Keyboard_layout



#33 GaryUK

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Posted 20 March 2018 - 15:27

I have Schiffer's book "Office Collectibles" by Thomas Russo which covers some great vintage equipment including typewriters.

 

Gary  



#34 BillZ

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Posted 21 March 2018 - 15:48

Dromgoole's Fine Writing Instruments &Stationery in Houston started out as a typewriter sales and repair store in 1961. They still have some come through the store occasionally. They don't do in house repairs anymore but do have a source for repairs I believe. 


Pat Barnes a.k.a. billz

#35 shamwari

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Posted 21 March 2018 - 21:18

Thanks for the post about the Williams English course using typewriters, very interesting, and nice that the students got to keep the typewriter they were using at the end of the course.

"If you want to succeed in the world, you don't have to be much cleverer than other people. You just have to be one day earlier." -- Leo Szilard


#36 Dickkooty2

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Posted 22 March 2018 - 00:54

What about a Smith Corona Skyriter? It was meant to be able to be used on an airplane and is sized like a laptop. http://typewriterdat...ml0ZXI=.86.bmys

Thanks, Janelac!

 

I have just received the Skywriter and dropped it off for a clean up/fix up.

 

I now have 23 typewriters and want to stop at 25.

 

I have two brands in some depth more than  onesy-twosys: Hermes and Olivetti. I am thinking of the Lettera 32 designed by Marcello Nizzoli as well as the Lettera 22, and the Studio 45 designed by Ettore Sottsass who also designed the Valentine. With my Lettera 22 and the Valentine, I would have the key typewriters in the Olivetti "Museum" ad.



#37 MKB

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Posted 01 April 2018 - 07:45

I just lucked into this 1938 beauty for my first typewriter since a Brother electric I had back in the eighties.

D57A7680-98A0-4873-AC7E-CC1C783E2146.jpeg

#38 MilanKov

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Posted 03 April 2018 - 13:06

Well I have this undefined Underwood typewriter no idea what model it is. It looks like a no. 5, but I am not sure as there was no plaque with model number. Sad thing is I have found it in a pile of a metal for scrapping in metal scrap yard four years back cost me like two bucks. After dismantling and cleaning the thing writes fine though finding carbon tape for it is a pain.

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If you win over your own stupidity then are you winner or loser? In any case it means something good.

 


#39 Dickkooty2

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Posted 03 April 2018 - 14:18

I just lucked into this 1938 beauty for my first typewriter since a Brother electric I had back in the eighties.

attachicon.gif D57A7680-98A0-4873-AC7E-CC1C783E2146.jpeg

 

 What a find ... a Holy Grail! Congratulations on this beauty!

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=0LJef6yIILM



#40 Dickkooty2

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Posted 03 April 2018 - 14:20

I just lucked into this 1938 beauty for my first typewriter since a Brother electric I had back in the eighties.

attachicon.gif D57A7680-98A0-4873-AC7E-CC1C783E2146.jpeg

 

 What a beauty ... a Holy Grail. Congratulations!

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=0LJef6yIILM

 

OOPS.  But this classic design deserves the double accolade.








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