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Luxury Pencil: Your Thoughts ...


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55 replies to this topic

#41 MYU

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 18:58

The closest I have to luxury is a Pilot H-2085 with the grip in wood. I have many others by many brands, but such a warm feeling only with this one.

Chiara

 

Nice choice, Chiara!  How is the weight?  Is it a metal alloy or plastic barrel that is attached to the wood grip?


[MYU's Pen Review Corner]   |   "The Common Ground" -- Jeffrey Small


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#42 Dickkooty2

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 19:12

While I do have mechanical pencils that I have bought for their design (read Caran d' Ache) and lead holders for their design and possibilities, I believe there is something about the wood and graphite that says pencil to me in a more essential way.

 

Here is a store dedicated to that simple item:

fpn_1516216577__screen_shot_2018-01-17_a

 

https://cwpencils.com/

 

 I have the Palomino Steinbeck reissues with the wide, adjustable eraser, but for everyday use in jotting down a note or making a sketch, General's Semi-hex 498 soft does it for me.

 

General is one of the last pencil manufacturers standing in the USA. Here is a current NYT feature:

 

https://www.nytimes....-factories.html



#43 MYU

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 20:49

Well, I'd consider the Lamy 2000 stainless steel mechanical pencil to be luxury... as list price is $250 USD.  I got it on a super sale just recently, for $100 USD.  And wow, was it well worth it.  I feel like I should have bought two of them!

 

Lamy-2000_SS-_MP_01.jpg

 

Lamy-2000_SS-_MP_02.jpg


[MYU's Pen Review Corner]   |   "The Common Ground" -- Jeffrey Small


#44 stuck-in-time

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 15:24

Well, I'd consider the Lamy 2000 stainless steel mechanical pencil to be luxury... as list price is $250 USD.  I got it on a super sale just recently, for $100 USD.  And wow, was it well worth it.  I feel like I should have bought two of them!

 

 

I think that's a good case of a simple material change changing the "status" of the item.

 

That's a very nice looking pencil. I gather It's quite a lot heavier than the makrolon version?


Edited by stuck-in-time, 14 February 2018 - 15:25.


#45 MYU

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 18:20

I think that's a good case of a simple material change changing the "status" of the item.

 

That's a very nice looking pencil. I gather It's quite a lot heavier than the makrolon version?

Yes, it is obviously heavier... I'd say about the weight of a rOtring 600 mechanical pencil.  For a large hand, it feels just fine.  Actually, on a cool morning it's cold to the touch and you can't help but notice that.  But in a few moments it warms up from being held and in some ways it's kind of nice to know the pencil "reacts" to the user.  ;)


[MYU's Pen Review Corner]   |   "The Common Ground" -- Jeffrey Small


#46 bluebellrose

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Posted 24 February 2018 - 09:04

I usually use the pentel side fx. Has a nice big eraser for taking field notes.

#47 Polanova

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Posted 24 February 2018 - 16:00

Looks like my taste in high end pencils runs in a completely different direction, as can be expected seeing that matters concerning esthetics are highly subjective  :)

Given the fact that there`s practically nothing out there reg. modern pencils (whatever price tag attached) which please me, I´ve looked at vintage pencils from the FP Golden Age & came to the subjective conclusion that the most beautiful pencils were produced during the 30ies by Conklin (Endura Flattop) and Wahl-Eversharp, especially the Doric series. In the meantime I`ve acquired two of these beauties, a Wahl-Eversharp Oversize in Green Shell & a Wahl-Eversharp Doric Junior in Burma. Both pencils are heavier than their Fountain Pen versions as the interior is made from brass which gives the pens a nice heft without being too heavy. Personally I prefer the smaller Junior sized pen.

If these pens were modern productions, my guess is, they`d retail for around 500 bucks (if they weren`t limited editions).

As it were I paid less for both than MYU paid for his Lamy  :P

Try as I might I never manage to tanslate the celluloid`s beauty into adequate photographs:

 

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  • Wahl-Eversharp-Doric-Pencils.jpg
  • Wahl-Eversharp-Doric-junior-Pencil.jpg


#48 Polanova

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Posted 24 February 2018 - 16:05

I might add the question why there are so much fewer vintage pencils on offer than their FP-counterparts?

Have they been more readily disposed off than fountain pens?



#49 Polanova

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Posted 24 February 2018 - 16:25

Here`s another attempt to catch the pen`s beauty  :)

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  • Junior-Doric-+Sketch.jpg


#50 MYU

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Posted 24 February 2018 - 22:04

Beautiful pencils, Polanova.  The celluloid patterns and colors are certainly beautiful.

 

These lend themselves more as collectibles than user instruments, for several reasons.  First, celluloid is not as durable as modern plastics and metals.  If you drop such a pencil, you risk shatters and cracks.  Second, most of these older pencils came in 0.9mm or 1.0mm sizes, which is a limitation for those who need a more narrow 0.7mm or 0.5mm (most common).  Third, their lead advance mechanism is a twist type, and is done at the front... which requires two hands to operate (one hand holds the pencil, while the other hand does the rotation).  This isn't to say they're not worth owning -- but I see them more as part of a collection than something to be used frequently.

 

As for the availability of vintage mechanical pencils, it does seem that they'd often get separated from their matching fountain pens... so you'd not often see one accompanying a vintage fountain pen being sold.  But look at the vintage pencil lots on the used market... you can find many, many older mechanical pencils and some that may have had a fountain pen mate.  It's a bit unwieldy though, because sellers often don't know what they have and won't show good photos of any specific pencil.  Thus, you have little idea of the true condition and function.  Plus, if you're looking for just one pencil, you're not going to be inclined to pay for all those "junker" pencils in the bunch just to get one pencil.  ;)


[MYU's Pen Review Corner]   |   "The Common Ground" -- Jeffrey Small


#51 milkb0at

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Posted 24 February 2018 - 23:08

I never knew I needed a a Doric Junior in Burma celluloid, but now I do. Lovely pencils there.



#52 JD-Be

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Posted 25 February 2018 - 07:24

I agree with "amk", some cheaper pens are worthful. I have one from the 50ties, heritated from my grandma. An "LCH  Versatil 5627" probalbly from Czechoslovakia. It's small and fits beautiful in my hand. But all respect who likes to write with good expensive ones.

lchversatil5627-small.jpg



#53 JD-Be

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Posted 25 February 2018 - 07:33

My old (50ties) pencil, celluloid made: LCH-Versatil 5627, probably from Czechoslavakia. Very well and strong made. Writes nice and easy and is heavy enough in my hand. Maybe this was once an expensive one!   BTW, I agree with "amk".

lchversatil5627-small.jpg



#54 Polanova

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Posted 25 February 2018 - 17:15

I never knew I needed a a Doric Junior in Burma celluloid, but now I do. Lovely pencils there.

 

 

I never knew either, until I got mine  :D - In photos, Burma Celluloid doesn`t look terribly exciting but in real life -i find- it can only be topped by arco celluloid.



#55 Polanova

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Posted 25 February 2018 - 17:36

Beautiful pencils, Polanova.  The celluloid patterns and colors are certainly beautiful.

 

These lend themselves more as collectibles than user instruments, for several reasons.  First, celluloid is not as durable as modern plastics and metals.  If you drop such a pencil, you risk shatters and cracks.  Second, most of these older pencils came in 0.9mm or 1.0mm sizes, which is a limitation for those who need a more narrow 0.7mm or 0.5mm (most common).  Third, their lead advance mechanism is a twist type, and is done at the front... which requires two hands to operate (one hand holds the pencil, while the other hand does the rotation).  This isn't to say they're not worth owning -- but I see them more as part of a collection than something to be used frequently.

 

As for the availability of vintage mechanical pencils, it does seem that they'd often get separated from their matching fountain pens... so you'd not often see one accompanying a vintage fountain pen being sold.  But look at the vintage pencil lots on the used market... you can find many, many older mechanical pencils and some that may have had a fountain pen mate.  It's a bit unwieldy though, because sellers often don't know what they have and won't show good photos of any specific pencil.  Thus, you have little idea of the true condition and function.  Plus, if you're looking for just one pencil, you're not going to be inclined to pay for all those "junker" pencils in the bunch just to get one pencil.  ;)

 

Thanks, MYU  :) In fact, I don`t want any of my pens to drop, but it`s true that there are disadvantages, like lead size. I`ll be using these pencils mostly at home.

Obviously they won`t make my set of GraphGear1000 pencils obsolete, but is nice to use them on occasion, as I`m a big fan of celluloid. As I`m probably more a pen accumulator as collector I enjoy using vintage pens.

 

After having a deep look into vintage pen sites & the fleabay I can say that pencils are generally a lot rarer than the fountain pens they belong to.

You`ll find a lot more Eversharp Doric fountain pens than pencils and prices seem to be all over the place.

Same with modern pencils: It took me ages to find out that Visconti Divina pencils actually exist & only found 2 (!!) shops who have them on offer. Same with Omas: Celluloid Omas FP`s pop up regularly but I haven`t seen a pencil yet. If they appear at all they`re offered as pairs (not that I`d be willing to pay premium price for an Omas pencil, just because they`re rarer; the facetted ones are as nice as Dorics but not in any way nicer  ;) )


Edited by Polanova, 25 February 2018 - 17:47.


#56 Zaphodbebullbrox

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 00:38

When I was young and just starting out in my career as a Draftsman I used pencils on a regular basis. So next to Fountain Pens I love Mechanical Pencils.

My personal Choice is Montblanc Writers Edition Pencils.


Edited by Zaphodbebullbrox, 01 March 2018 - 12:11.







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