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M400 Nib In M200 Body


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#1 nibl

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Posted 30 November 2017 - 21:03

Does anyone have experience with an M400 nib inside an M200 body?

I'd like to upgrade my writing experience, but I'm not sure how big the difference would be.

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#2 BillH

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Posted 30 November 2017 - 21:12

I put a nice OB nib into a spare Grey Marble and was quite pleased with it.  I may swap it over to the new Brown Marble.

 

I like the standard nibs in the M200 pens just fine and probably would not have made a straight swap of, say, an M200 M for an M400 M... not sure I would notice that difference, but I am old and my hands aren't as finely tuned as they used to be.  YMMV  ;)

 

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#3 alwayssunnyalwaysreal

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Posted 30 November 2017 - 21:12

Have you tried the M400 gold nibs yet?

 

Both the M400 gold nib and the M200 stainless steel nib write with high performance, in my opinion. But they offer quite different writing experiences. Both have a little amount of spring (the M400 gold nib is on the rigid side among gold nibs, while the M200 stainless steel nib is on the springy side among stainless steel nibs).

 

Personally if I have unlimited budget, I will upgrade all of my M200/M205 pens to gold nibs. But considering that I do have M400 pens already, I probably won't, since I think the M400 pens are more polished in general, and the extra trim ring on the grip section makes the pen much more comfortable to hold. The saved cost between M400 and the M200 + gold nib is not good enough for me.


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#4 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 30 November 2017 - 22:18

Modern 400 nibs are more butter smooth, because they are fat and blobby semi-nails. Good to make a stub or CI out of.

200's are a nice springy regular flex nib.

The '82-97 400's gold nibs are very nice springy regular flex nibs = to the 200's.

 

The '50-65 semi-flex 400 nibs are stubbs...... giving good line variation with out doing anything but writing normal.....and if you match the ink and paper can shade also.....If you are going to put a gold nib on your 200....why not a vintage semi-flex nib of '50-65 era?????

 

For a long time I had a semi-flex  '54 400's B nib :notworthy1: :puddle:on my 605  ....the 200/400/600 nibs are interchangeable.

 

IMO the vintage gold nibs offer you something grand.............the modern a fat and blobby butter smooth nib.

The '80's-97 era gold nib is matched by the steel nib of the 200.....but many folks don't realize how good a nib the 200 offers. ....after all It's Not Gold!!!

 

I was a gold snob for a while too :doh: ....it cost me some real nice Osmia steel nibbed pens....that I learned were as grand as the Osmia gold nibs after a while and not right off the bat, when I could have afforded a couple more pens at 10-15% cheaper for = grand nibs.

 

I am much impressed by the 200's nib. I have a fair amount of gold nibs also.

What width do you have????

F is better for shading than EF.

What shading ink do you have?

 

Do you have 90g or + laser paper to have your ink shade on. I find regular flex, gold or steel to be good for shading. Semi-flex can due to ease of tine bend and spread, drown the shading by being wetter.


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 30 November 2017 - 22:27.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany      Info on Bock nibs

 

Due to Mauricio's improved definition of Super-flex, I try not use the term Easy Full Flex, but fail...sigh.

 

Semi-flex is an “almost” flex; not a ‘flex’ nib. It is great for regular writing with a touch of flair. It can give you some fancy; but it is not made for real fancy writing. For bit more of that get a maxi-semi-flex. Both spread tines 3X.  Those are not "Flex" nibs. 

 

Wider than Normal does not exist. Wider than Japanese does. Every company has it's very own standard + slop/tolerance. Developed from the users of it's pens and inks only; not the users or inks of other companies pens. The size you grind a nib to, is your standard only. Paper and ink matter to nib width. Thank god for 1/2 sizes or it would be boring.


#5 Calabria

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Posted 30 November 2017 - 22:23

It depends on the M200. I put a M400 EF nib in my M200 Cafe Creme and while the writing experience IMO is vastly improved - smoother writing - it's also aesthetically more pleasing. I like the look of the two tone gold nib and it goes with the furniture and overall classy look of the pen.

I don't feel the same way about my regular black M200 - it's fine with a steel nib.
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#6 nibl

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Posted 30 November 2017 - 23:27

Thank you all for your feedback so far. It does sound like the modern M400 might not be what I am looking for. I am extremely pleased with my M200 nib. Couldn't be happier with it. I just wanted to explore something more in the Pelikan range without having to spend so much at the moment.

@Bo Bo Olsens suggestion sounds interesting. How much do vintage M200 nibs cost and where do you find ones in good working order? In other words, a reliable seller.

#7 sargetalon

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Posted 01 December 2017 - 00:21

I dont think the writing experience justifies the price. Im happy with the M200 nibs in general. The upgrade would be for aesthetics and perhaps a slightly smoother line but thats about it. Everyone is different and you have to make your own judgement but for me, its not worth it. That opinion is based on my experience with 71 Pelikan stainless steel nibs and 54 14C ones. Id rather save up a little more and just get an M4xx model and have both.

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#8 DougS

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Posted 01 December 2017 - 01:32

I do it all the time. Works great, looks are improved, and seems classier. But I've got lots of extra nibs to play with and it doesn't cost me anything. If it did, I doubt I could realize any improvement for the expense difference involved.

 

Also, I've got some great M200 steel nibs that out-perform many of Pelikan's gold units -- just sayin'.

 

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#9 Runnin_Ute

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Posted 01 December 2017 - 03:01

What you might look into, rather than either a new M200 or a M400 nib is get a vintage Pelikan with a gold nib. I tried the 140 nib in my M200 Cognac. They are not interchangeable. Perhaps a 400/400N or 400NN - which is what Bo Bo was referring to I believe.

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#10 chromantic

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Posted 01 December 2017 - 04:23

It's my experience that the gold nibs lay down a *slightly* wider line than their steel nib counterparts, especially with wetter inks.


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#11 hari317

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Posted 01 December 2017 - 04:41

The M400 nib will perfectly fit the M200 body and vice versa. They are the same nib units. Except for the nib.

If you want to preserve the monotone gold nib appearance of your M200 and still try out a gold nib, you can look for a M 250 nib. They are cheaper than M400 nibs and very nice writers. I had purchased a few from German vendors. You can check the current situation.

Edited by hari317, 01 December 2017 - 17:37.

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#12 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 01 December 2017 - 14:34

I was able to use my 140's nibs in my 400, but the smaller size of a 140's nib makes it look dorky.

 

If one has only a 140 for semi-flex and at home where none can see....one could try the 140's nib. But I really don't see a why to it, in the 140 posts long, as long or nearly as long as a 400.


www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany      Info on Bock nibs

 

Due to Mauricio's improved definition of Super-flex, I try not use the term Easy Full Flex, but fail...sigh.

 

Semi-flex is an “almost” flex; not a ‘flex’ nib. It is great for regular writing with a touch of flair. It can give you some fancy; but it is not made for real fancy writing. For bit more of that get a maxi-semi-flex. Both spread tines 3X.  Those are not "Flex" nibs. 

 

Wider than Normal does not exist. Wider than Japanese does. Every company has it's very own standard + slop/tolerance. Developed from the users of it's pens and inks only; not the users or inks of other companies pens. The size you grind a nib to, is your standard only. Paper and ink matter to nib width. Thank god for 1/2 sizes or it would be boring.


#13 Songyi

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Posted 02 December 2017 - 01:46

I was able to use my 140's nibs in my 400, but the smaller size of a 140's nib makes it look dorky.

 

If one has only a 140 for semi-flex and at home where none can see....one could try the 140's nib. But I really don't see a why to it, in the 140 posts long, as long or nearly as long as a 400.

 

Agreed. The 140 nib can (and should) fit the 400/400N/400NN as well as M2XX/M40X/M60X but looks out of proportion. They are great nibs, but if you are looking at vintage nibs to try, the 400* size will fit the M200 much better—at least in terms of appearance.


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#14 Calabria

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Posted 02 December 2017 - 01:55


I do it all the time. Works great, looks are improved, and seems classier. But I've got lots of extra nibs to play with and it doesn't cost me anything. If it did, I doubt I could realize any improvement for the expense difference involved.

 

Also, I've got some great M200 steel nibs that out-perform many of Pelikan's gold units -- just sayin'.

 

fpn_1512091674__pelikan_m200_gold_nib.jp

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#15 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 02 December 2017 - 22:59

The second golden rule right after rule # 1...Take your time.

Is Rule #2....All nibs will vary........with in brand, more so outside of brand. Horseshoe close is as close as you can get.......................unless you wish to employ a nibmeister to thin your nibs to your very own standard....just don't change ink or paper afterwards..................... :o :unsure: I heard humidity can be blamed also. :lticaptd:

 

Odd, it's always my skinny nib is not skinny enough....never my broad nib ain't fat enough. :rolleyes:


www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany      Info on Bock nibs

 

Due to Mauricio's improved definition of Super-flex, I try not use the term Easy Full Flex, but fail...sigh.

 

Semi-flex is an “almost” flex; not a ‘flex’ nib. It is great for regular writing with a touch of flair. It can give you some fancy; but it is not made for real fancy writing. For bit more of that get a maxi-semi-flex. Both spread tines 3X.  Those are not "Flex" nibs. 

 

Wider than Normal does not exist. Wider than Japanese does. Every company has it's very own standard + slop/tolerance. Developed from the users of it's pens and inks only; not the users or inks of other companies pens. The size you grind a nib to, is your standard only. Paper and ink matter to nib width. Thank god for 1/2 sizes or it would be boring.


#16 pajaro

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Posted 03 December 2017 - 00:13

Lots of people have put M400 nibs into M200s.  The M400 is like a trim level, and the function is the same.  Sometimes you can pick up an M400 nib on ebay cheaply, but not often.  I have chanced across a few M400s made into fine italics.  Personally I find flexible nibs irritating, so I like the modern paragons of firmness.


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#17 Runnin_Ute

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Posted 03 December 2017 - 01:20

Agreed. The 140 nib can (and should) fit the 400/400N/400NN as well as M2XX/M40X/M60X but looks out of proportion. They are great nibs, but if you are looking at vintage nibs to try, the 400* size will fit the M200 much better—at least in terms of appearance.


When I tried the 140 seemed to fit the M200, but the M200 didn't seem to fit the 140. I wasn't going to force it.

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#18 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 03 December 2017 - 23:52

The modern '98 to now gold nibs of a Pelikan is fatter than the pre'98 gold nibs, which were 200 wide.

xxxxxxxxxx

 

I soon had other semi-flex nibbed pens, so didn't have to put up with the dorky look of a too small nib of the 140.....on it's own pen it's a good match for size.


www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany      Info on Bock nibs

 

Due to Mauricio's improved definition of Super-flex, I try not use the term Easy Full Flex, but fail...sigh.

 

Semi-flex is an “almost” flex; not a ‘flex’ nib. It is great for regular writing with a touch of flair. It can give you some fancy; but it is not made for real fancy writing. For bit more of that get a maxi-semi-flex. Both spread tines 3X.  Those are not "Flex" nibs. 

 

Wider than Normal does not exist. Wider than Japanese does. Every company has it's very own standard + slop/tolerance. Developed from the users of it's pens and inks only; not the users or inks of other companies pens. The size you grind a nib to, is your standard only. Paper and ink matter to nib width. Thank god for 1/2 sizes or it would be boring.


#19 mitto

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 15:10

I am using a 400NN nib unit in a black M481 that originally came with a steel nib.
Khan






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