Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies






Photo

Fountain Pen Revolution On A Jinhao?


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 AberHulk

AberHulk

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 64 posts
  • Location:Northern California
  • Flag:

Posted 27 November 2017 - 09:03

Has anyone tried putting the FPR #6 nib on a Jinhao 450, 750 or 159? (does the 159 have the same nib size?)


“Some day you will be old enough to start reading fairytales again.”

― C.S. Lewis

“Deep in the human unconscious is a pervasive need for a logical universe that makes sense. But the real universe is always one step beyond logic.” 

― Frank HerbertDune


Sponsored Content

#2 Jamerelbe

Jamerelbe

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,240 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 28 November 2017 - 14:56

Yes, I've tried it - but no, it's not a good fit.  The back/bottom ends of the Jinhao nibs fit more 'snugly' against the feed than the FPR nibs, which are a bit more 'flared out'.  A Jinhao nib will fit comfortably in a pen designed for a FPR #6 / #35 nib or similar - but I couldn't get an FPR nib to fit into the grip section of my Jinhao x750.  

 

Also, in answer to your other question: yes, the Jinhao 159 has the same size nib as the x450 and x750!



#3 AberHulk

AberHulk

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 64 posts
  • Location:Northern California
  • Flag:

Posted 29 November 2017 - 01:58

Thank you for the information. Darn I really like their nibs

“Some day you will be old enough to start reading fairytales again.”

― C.S. Lewis

“Deep in the human unconscious is a pervasive need for a logical universe that makes sense. But the real universe is always one step beyond logic.” 

― Frank HerbertDune


#4 Jamerelbe

Jamerelbe

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,240 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 29 November 2017 - 02:09

Thank you for the information. Darn I really like their nibs

 

Yeah, it's a shame - I find their #5.5 nibs are just a bit too wide to fit comfortably into a plastic 599 grip section, too.  You really have to cram them in, and I'm not prepared to do that...  Great nibs, though, especially for the price!



#5 mke

mke

    I NEED a Pelikan M1000 or a MB149 in vermillion

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 991 posts
  • Location:Touchdown town in the north-east of Tokyo

Posted 29 November 2017 - 13:02

As it doesn't - try this.

A Jowo #6 fits nicely into a Jinhao 450, 750 and 159.

I am using these nibs: http://www.fpnibs.co...-rhodium.html#/

 

It is really an upgrade. You will realize the difference.

 

----

Which other Chinese pens do these FPR nibs #5.5 and #6 fit?



#6 Bookman

Bookman

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,967 posts
  • Location:Northern California

Posted 05 February 2018 - 23:21

The #6 F.P.R. "flex" nib in the JinHao x450.  It's a tight fit.  And you do have to round out the base of the

nib so it's less parabolic.  But it fits, and both nib and feed are removable thereafter.  Just make

sure you orient and insert the nib and feed properly.  As I'm sure you're well aware,

despite commonly accepted folklore to the contrary there is only one correct

way to orient and insert nibs and feeds on most pens, and that is

equally true with the x450: every other way is wrong.

Use a generic #6 feed.

 

fpn_1513829818__450.jpg

 

 

 

The # 5.5 F.P.R. "flex" nib in the Baoer 388.  This is a nice pen with the stock nib.  It's a fantastic pen, however,

with the F.P.R. "flex" nib.  It makes the writing more fun and more interesting.  As with the x450,

this nib needs a slight bit of rounding at the base to fit into the section.  And as with the

x450, mind how you insert the nib and feed. If you don't orient them correctly,

the nib and feed won't go in at all. Be advised, however, that when

it does start to go in, the fit is very tight indeed.

Consider making this a permanent

change. Use a #5 generic feed.

 

fpn_1517871235__baoer-388-and-55-flex-ni

 

 

 

For the benefit of the uninitiated, here's what I'm talking about when I talk about the proper orientation of the nib and

feed when inserting them into the opening to the section.  Below are the feed and section of my JinHao x750.

The shape of the section opening is identical to openings for the x450, Edison and Conklin nib-unit

housing, Nemosine, and a great many other pens.  One good look at these photos followed by a

good look at the opening to your similar section will tell you whether you've already

deformed your section by shoving the nib and feed in "any old way." Over a

very short period of time, shoving the nib and feed in "any old way"

will cause the shape to begin rounding, but won't necessarily

widen the circumference right away.  The result: the

nib and feed will be more difficult to insert

until the opening has been stretched

wider than it should be.

 

 

fpn_1517886056__55-nib-and-feed-and-sect

 

fpn_1517887441__20180205_171016.jpg

 

fpn_1517886023__55-nib-feed-section-o2.j


Edited by Bookman, 06 February 2018 - 04:11.

I love the smell of fountain pen ink in the morning.

 

 

 


#7 bugsydog55

bugsydog55

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 93 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 09 February 2018 - 21:19

Excellent description and photos to explain an issue I'm sure a lot of folks have questions about.  Getting things properly oriented will make all the difference in the world.  When I first started with fountain pens, friction fit meant just one thing-pulling like crazy to get the nib and feed out then shoving to the point of hurt fingers until they were kind of in the right place.  Afterwards you wrap your fingers in bandaids and hopefully there won't be an ink hemorrhage when you refill your "improved" pen.   Some pens do have rounded sections but pen users do need to be reminded to look first.  Changing nibs can be a lot of fun but, depending on the pen you are working on, it can be a lot of delicate work.  Use some caution before you grab a hammer and the channel locks.



#8 Inky_paws

Inky_paws

    Illegible and incoherent

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 116 posts
  • Location:Adelaide, South Australia
  • Flag:

Posted 10 February 2018 - 05:32

 

And you do have to round out the base of the nib so it's less parabolic.

 

What sort of weaponry do you use to do this?

 

Thanks for the photos of the correct orientation - obvious once you know about it.



#9 Bookman

Bookman

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,967 posts
  • Location:Northern California

Posted 10 February 2018 - 19:28

 

What sort of weaponry do you use to do this?

 

Thanks for the photos of the correct orientation - obvious once you know about it.

 

fpn_1518289608__20180210_110158.jpg

 

I apologize for omitting the reference to the body of the nib as well as the base.  So let me make amends with more clarity.  Round out the parabola by starting at the base, then moving up the body, but going no farther up than the bottom of the slit between the tines.  As for weaponry, I use plastic-tip pliers, eyeballs, and, if necessary, a short bit of trial-and-error.  (The nib in the photo is not an F.P.R. "flex" nib.  It's just a stand-in.)


Edited by Bookman, 10 February 2018 - 19:41.

I love the smell of fountain pen ink in the morning.

 

 

 


#10 Inky_paws

Inky_paws

    Illegible and incoherent

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 116 posts
  • Location:Adelaide, South Australia
  • Flag:

Posted 11 February 2018 - 01:53

I wasn't aware of plastic tip pliers - oh goody, another tool to buy :D

 

I think I've also been a bit confused. I thought you were filing the end of the nib to a different shape but I now suspect you're squeezing it to change the cross section curve. Is that correct?

 

When I first looked at that photo, I was trying to work out what the spring in the middle was... then realised it was the back of the nib. :rolleyes:



#11 Bookman

Bookman

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,967 posts
  • Location:Northern California

Posted 11 February 2018 - 04:39

I wasn't aware of plastic tip pliers - oh goody, another tool to buy :D

 

I think I've also been a bit confused. I thought you were filing the end of the nib to a different shape but I now suspect you're squeezing it to change the cross section curve. Is that correct?

 

When I first looked at that photo, I was trying to work out what the spring in the middle was... then realised it was the back of the nib. :rolleyes:

 

Yes, my photo of the pliers on the nib shows the nib from the base and not the tip.

 

When I first tried to insert the nib and feed together, had trouble, and I took a closer look at the point of contact between the nib base and the section …

 

fpn_1517886023__55-nib-feed-section-o2.j

 

… it appeared to me that the "flex" nib wasn't as rounded as the top of the section opening.  I tried but failed to squeeze the base and body into a rounder shape with my thumb and forefinger.  My plastic-tip pliers were right there in front of me, and so I resorted to those and they did the job.  It never occurred to me to file the edge.  It might have escaped me because I don't own a file, but I own a pair of plastic-tip pliers.


I love the smell of fountain pen ink in the morning.

 

 

 







Sponsored Content




|