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Are Im's Practical As General Used Fountain Pens?

im vacumatic fountain pen parker practical question general use

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41 replies to this topic

#21 Liuna

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 15:33

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Edited by Liuna, 14 November 2017 - 17:43.


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#22 Liuna

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 15:34

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Edited by Liuna, 14 November 2017 - 17:44.


#23 Liuna

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 15:34

I love the Parker squeeze converter (not so much the Sheaffer ones) and especially the original 1960s' fatty ones like in your pen. They do add to the weight of the otherwise too light plastic bodied Parker pens.

Ehat's the disadvantage of the Sheaffer ones? I saw a squeezing process in a review video, the pen itself looks almost the same as the one I ordered: https://youtu.be/QcpmPARbOUo
By the way, the man in the video says it was a Custom type. Could mine be one too? I checked photos that show the 45 types with labels of gold capped plastic ones among them, but Classic which is silver capped, Ingenuity which is full golden filled/rolled etc.
It adds just enough weight then I guess :-) Sorry, posted 3 times by accident.

Edited by Liuna, 14 November 2017 - 17:45.


#24 Liuna

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Posted 16 November 2017 - 20:10

I thought I'd ask if this ink is okay because well, it's my boyfriend's and he said it was a fountain ink pen but it says drawing ink, so I'm not sure. He has a box full of these in more colors like red, sepia, green, yellow, black, a darker red and this ultramarine. It doesn't look saturated, it's almost like colored water, especially the green one. God knows how old they are, maybe 20? So overall: would this be okay for the 45?

 

(He also has a bigger-bottled, different ink I didn't memorize the name of and in stationeries I saw Pelikan 4001s for about 4-5 dollars).

(As for the pen, it's expected to arrive tomorrow, on 17th).

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#25 Gerd W

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Posted 16 November 2017 - 21:06

Please stay away from this. It's, as you said yourself, drawing ink.

Drawing ink is pigmented and in no way suitable for Fountain Pens.



#26 Liuna

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Posted 16 November 2017 - 21:35

Please stay away from this. It's, as you said yourself, drawing ink.

Drawing ink is pigmented and in no way suitable for Fountain Pens.

Okay, thank you. I suspected so. So it' rather for calligraphy tools. What does pigmented exactly stand for here, in this case?
 

He (my boyfriend) has an other kind in a bigger bottle made here in Hungary, I will take a good look at it before trying it out (I don't have it with me now). But it doesn't look like this one at all. We loaded a lever fountain pen of his with it (this latter bigger one) and it works fine with it so far.

 

In "worst" case, I might buy a Pelikan 4001, they have nice colors. I hope this one would be okay.

 

 

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#27 Gerd W

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Posted 16 November 2017 - 22:15

Ink-pigments are particles which carry color. They are insoluble and may clog the feed of your pen or do more damage to it.

Other members here may specify it.

 

Amongst others I do use Pelikan 4001 for decades, it's nice and recommendable. 

Enjoy your pen! 



#28 Liuna

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Posted 16 November 2017 - 22:24

Ink-pigments are particles which carry color. They are insoluble and may clog the feed of your pen or do more damage to it.

Other members here may specify it.

 

Amongst others I do use Pelikan 4001 for decades, it's nice and recommendable. 

Enjoy your pen! 

Thank you.

I just found this video and "by coincidence" it shows a 45 writing with Pelikan 4001. :) https://www.youtube....h?v=dSV6zac_x6Y

 

Still waiting for it, I hope to pick it up tomorrow at the post office.



#29 Runnin_Ute

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 00:53

The 45 is a wonderful pen. I have two Flighters and a few other 45's. I also have 2 IM's. Those have a tendency to be hard starters and dry out quickly. So they don't get used.

Brad
 
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#30 Needhelp

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 04:16

If the squeeze converter doesnt work for you properly, then you the Parker 45 can use PARKER cartridges which available almost everywhere!

#31 rochester21

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 08:29


I would suggest you buy a 1970s/1980s era Parker 45 flighter (all steel body), instead. You may find one with a 14k nib for the price (or for nearly about the price) of the IM.


Yes but for people who prefer wider/heavier pens that reliable as well, the IM is the way to go. My only problem with them is that the cap is a bit loose when capped. Not a major issue, i just prefer tighter mechanisms.
Also the modern F nib is slightly wider that the old P45 one, but slightly smoother as well.

In any case, there is no excuse not to have both. You only buy a 45 once, 'cause they last forever.

#32 Liuna

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 11:49

.

Edited by Liuna, 17 November 2017 - 12:57.


#33 Liuna

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 11:50

If the squeeze converter doesnt work for you properly, then you the Parker 45 can use PARKER cartridges which available almost everywhere!


Yep, I've read of it and it's a big advantage. :-) I saw a longer Parker patron designed for converters at a stationery, they are in black and blue only though. Saw the converter in a webshop, it has a pretty good prize. I hope it will be fine, maybe I won't fill the sac fully at first while testing.

#34 Liuna

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 12:56

Here is a little sample how it writes :-) Got the Pelikan 4001 ink too, in turqoise.
The sac and the converter seem to be okay. A bit strangely, there is no marking regarding the nib size. I think it's a fine one. And no date code, but I guess that's not unusual...?
Anyway, it's nice to write with it indeed, thank you for the help :-)

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  • IMG_20171117_135617.jpg


#35 mitto

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 13:03

...
You only buy a 45 once, 'cause they last forever.


Ask some P45 lovers. :)
I have around 300 P45s and would buy more if only for the variety of the exotic nibs on them and their finishes.
Khan

#36 mitto

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 13:11

Here is a little sample how it writes :-) Got the Pelikan 4001 ink too, in turqoise.
The sac and the converter seem to be okay. A bit strangely, there is no marking regarding the nib size. I think it's a fine one. And no date code, but I guess that's not unusual...?
Anyway, it's nice to write with it indeed, thank you for the help :-)


The nib size would be on the underside of the color that holds the nib. Something like F, M or B and lot more depending on the nib variety.
A pre-1979 pen would not have the date code. The modern date coding system begun in mid 1979.

Enjoy writing with your new pen. The pen looks to be in pretty good shape.

And, CONGRATS.
Khan

#37 Liuna

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 13:39

The nib size would be on the underside of the color that holds the nib. Something like F, M or B and lot more depending on the nib variety.
A pre-1979 pen would not have the date code. The modern date coding system begun in mid 1979.

Enjoy writing with your new pen. The pen looks to be in pretty good shape.

And, CONGRATS.

 

So it seems they didn't use the pre-'79 coding on them. I looked at the bottom of the collar where it should be, but nothing. I took a photo. The nib is a fine one I think.

Thank you :) It is in good shape. It must have been used before, as it has very thin and small scratches on the cap. I hope the squeezer will still serve long.

(So now there is a 45 fp, a 45 pencil and a stainless steel Jotter for general use).

Thank you, and also thank you for the suggestions and for the help :)

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Edited by Liuna, 17 November 2017 - 13:41.


#38 mitto

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 13:46

So it seems they didn't use the pre-'79 coding on them. I looked at the bottom of the collar where it should be, but nothing. I took a photo. The nib is a fine one I think.
Thank you :) It is in good shape. It must have been used before, as it has very thin and small scratches on the cap. I hope the squeezer will still serve long.
(So now there is a 45 fp, a 45 pencil and a stainless steel Jotter for general use).
Thank you, and also thank you for the suggestions and for the help :)


In the period from late 1950s upto mid 1979 there existed no datecoding on Parker pens. And yes, the color sometimes do not have the nib size markings.

You are welcome.
Khan

#39 TruthPil

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Posted 23 November 2017 - 06:10

Congratulations on your new 45! I have an IM and am probably going to get my eighth 45 this week, so you can tell which model I prefer. The 45 is a solid and comfortable design with that amazing option of easily changing nibs.

I find the IM to feel OK in the hand despite being much heavier, but it's undoing is the poor seal of the cap. If I let the IM sit for just a few hours unused, I get a hard start the next time I pick it up. The nib is smoother than some of my 45s but hard starts are a deal breaker.

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#40 Liuna

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Posted 24 November 2017 - 16:26

Congratulations on your new 45! I have an IM and am probably going to get my eighth 45 this week, so you can tell which model I prefer. The 45 is a solid and comfortable design with that amazing option of easily changing nibs.

I find the IM to feel OK in the hand despite being much heavier, but it's undoing is the poor seal of the cap. If I let the IM sit for just a few hours unused, I get a hard start the next time I pick it up. The nib is smoother than some of my 45s but hard starts are a deal breaker.


Thank you :-) At first I was focusing on the "officially avaliable at stationeries" palette, but the 45 being a bit more vintage and IM having a heavy cap changed my mind. I wanted a durable, nivce, comfortable and not too expensive one.
That ratio (8 45s vs 1 IM) does explain it indeed :-) Sometimes my 45 starts a bit harder too, but I could imagine it's still doing better than the IM regarding that. Now I also tried out drawing with it, it's interesting. I think it "detaches" the ink very well.





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