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An Interesting Hand Position For Lefties

lefties flourishing hand

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10 replies to this topic

#1 sidthecat

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Posted 29 October 2017 - 19:04

I was looking at some manuscript samples while studying Secretary Hand (the almost unreadable Elizabethan scribble that is my particular fetish) and this image popped up.

The "Flourishing Hand" was the position that Spencerians used for adding those elaborate decorations and images to formal writing, but it's also a very interesting way for left-handed writers to utilize flex. It's easier in this position to achieve a wide stroke.

I have a couple of tiny ringtops with dip nibs that work really well this way. Yes, it looks weird, but the results are interesting.

fpn_1509217573__flourishing_hand.jpg



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#2 Newjelan

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Posted 01 November 2017 - 00:40

It's not entirely clear to me from the picture what you mean.  I think the person, while writing right handed has the paper turned 90 degrees?  If so, i can vouch for it working for left handers, clearly with the paper/notebook turned 90 degrees the other way.  I used to do all my writing this way, partly as it was more comfortable and partly due to lecture theatres only having right-handed seats when i was at Uni.  (I have gradually moved to more of a 45 degree angle.) Although, my use of Spencerian and Elizabethan is non-existent.



#3 Biber

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Posted 01 November 2017 - 01:21

I recently saw something similar to that used by a waitress at a, shall we say, "less than classy" restaurant. Though her's was an artifact of not having been taught how to write properly.
"What? What's that? WHAT?!!! SPEAK UP, I CAN'T HEAR YOU!!" - Ludwig van Beethoven.

#4 sidthecat

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Posted 05 November 2017 - 00:22

People frequently don’t know what I mean, so I don’t take it personally.
What I meant was that the hand position used to make doves and things with a calligraphy pen may be useful to a left-handed person for regular writing, because it’s essentially backwards. I’ve been having fun with it. You lose some control, but you gain expression because you’re pulling your strokes instead of pushing them.

#5 Newjelan

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Posted 05 November 2017 - 04:03

People frequently dont know what I mean, so I dont take it personally.
What I meant was that the hand position used to make doves and things with a calligraphy pen may be useful to a left-handed person for regular writing, because its essentially backwards. Ive been having fun with it. You lose some control, but you gain expression because youre pulling your strokes instead of pushing them.

I thought that was what you meant. I used to do it with my everyday writing and with practice, you gain control. I find it relaxing too, more rhythmical.

#6 ParramattaPaul

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Posted 05 November 2017 - 05:39

People frequently don’t know what I mean, so I don’t take it personally.
What I meant was that the hand position used to make doves and things with a calligraphy pen may be useful to a left-handed person for regular writing, because it’s essentially backwards. I’ve been having fun with it. You lose some control, but you gain expression because you’re pulling your strokes instead of pushing them.

 

As a leftie, and without actually trying that particular hold, I have to wonder whether or not the nib would dig into the paper on forward strokes.  I remember forwards strokes pushing the nib through the flimsy air mail paper we used for letters in the 1960s.



#7 sidthecat

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Posted 05 November 2017 - 18:49

I finished an Allan’s Journal before discovering this picture. The pages are thin, but pretty tough. My particular interest is in getting more expression from my flexible nibs. The ability to pull a stroke makes a great difference.

#8 Biber

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Posted 06 November 2017 - 13:47

Seems like a way for left under writers to write overhand. 


"What? What's that? WHAT?!!! SPEAK UP, I CAN'T HEAR YOU!!" - Ludwig van Beethoven.

#9 Aquaria

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Posted 29 November 2017 - 00:08

I was originally a leftie, but was forced to write right-handed at school. Now I'm an ambi.

 

The best position I've found for writing left-handed was the "under" method, rather than the tilt and hook or the smearer. I'm able to write as neatly left-handed that way as I do writing right-handed. No smearing, no smudging and no reading upside down.



#10 oneill

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 06:33

I thought that was what you meant. I used to do it with my everyday writing and with practice, you gain control. I find it relaxing too, more rhythmical.

What I must say about Lefties is that They are looked upon more favourably as Not being Strange anymore
and lots of people sympathise with them and their struggle to be accepted. There really is more written about
them and more patience of the way they use a Fountain pen.I repeat that much more is written about them and
efforts are being made to assist them with their problem which is only Fair. Trust Me, Oneill

#11 sidthecat

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 20:45

Thank you for your condescension, dear.





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: lefties, flourishing hand



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