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Need Some Us Patent Search Help


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#1 AAAndrew

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Posted 28 October 2017 - 23:16

I am having some trouble finding an American patent. Of course, there is a possibility that the reason I'm having trouble is that the patent is not there. 

 

In 1853 Charles Goodyear was awarded a patent in the UK and I'm looking to see if there is an American counterpart. 

 


Manufacture of pens, pencils and instruments used when writing, marking, and drawing



1693



15 July 1853



Charles Goodyear


 

 

I feel that it's likely that there is a patent because there was a product. 

 

fpn_1509232215__goodyear1859.jpg

 

I haven't found a Goodyear patent, but did find US9809 A, http://www.google.com/patents/US9809 

 

Anything from Goodyear you can find?

 

thanks

 


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#2 eharriett

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Posted 29 October 2017 - 17:06

Taking a quick look at the US patent office, it looks like, going back that far, we either need a patent number (which is what you are looking for) or a classification number. Any idea on that one?

Back then, the patent number in the US would have been printed on the pen itself.

#3 AAAndrew

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Posted 29 October 2017 - 19:57

That’s what I thought. So, with Early British patents, they don’t have any PDFs online, but they have a lot of grapeat subject matter indexes. https://thesteelpen....ritish-patents/

For American patents you have all the PDFs but you can only search if you have the number. The Google searches are also based on the poor OCR text.
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#4 eharriett

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Posted 29 October 2017 - 20:26

OK.  Is this just for curiosity's sake, or for a project?  The reason I'm asking is I live only one hour away from their corporate HQ and their corporate history dept. is there as well.  It's a local call, even.  If you're looking for an actual reason (not asking you to tell me what it is, just if you're looking for your own curiosity or if this is for a project), then give me a little time and something to identify what you're looking for and I can reach out for you.

 

Although, taking a closer look at the clipping you posted, the patent they are referring to just might simply be Goodyear's patenting of rubber vulcanization.

 

Let me know.

Elie


Edited by eharriett, 29 October 2017 - 20:31.


#5 AAAndrew

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Posted 30 October 2017 - 01:48

I'm looking for this as part of the larger research project on the history of the US steel pen trade. (at the risk of repeating myself, check out my blog https://thesteelpen.com/ where I'm posting some of this) I only recently ran across a mention of Goodyear rubber pens, then found the ads, then found that he had filed a patent in the UK. Charles Goodyear had a bunch of patent problems in the UK and I've not found any other mention of the pen patents I found in the UK files, either there or here. Unfortunately, I can't get access to the UK patent details, and I can't seem to find if there was a corresponding patent in the US for writing instruments. It could be that the India Rubber Pen Company (which I also cannot find any information about) was very short lived and only licensed the rubber from Goodyear, he had nothing else to do with it, but then, if that was the case, why file a patent in the UK for pens and writing instruments? 

 

My understanding is that Charles never actually had anything to do with the name that bares his name. The company history may or may not have any information on this early period. But, hey. If you're willing, I would be very curious to know. I have another British patent relating to writing instruments for Charles,  and one from his son Charles Jr. 

 

They're on my other computer. I'll pull those out and post them here. If you get a chance, that would be fantastic. But I know that can be a lot of trouble, so if it doesn't happen, don't worry about it. 

 

Thanks! 


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#6 parkergeo

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Posted 24 November 2017 - 17:53

Can't seem to find anything. Goodyear did have a US patent dealing with making hollow articles from rubber:

https://patentimages...ab01/US5536.pdf

 

but the only pen and pencil-related US rubber patent from that timeframe that relates to the Goodyear family patents I can find is one by another group that describes improvements, for example making the rubber pens more colorful:

https://patentimages.storage.googleapis.com/b5/02/c5/f68d8f8d9912a4/US48993.pdf 



#7 AAAndrew

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Posted 25 November 2017 - 02:01

Thanks, i’ll Take a look!
Check out my Steel Pen Blog. https://thesteelpen.com/ . 

 

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